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Should we use the 100 word language Tika as a medium for global communication?

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posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 07:57 PM
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Instead of paying thousands of dollars for translation fees for the media, why not just use a simpler language.

Tika was a language created for universal communication. Since Tika only has 100 words, the language can be learned easily and used to make simple translations for people to read. All of the 100 words, were chosen from a list of most commonly used words and thus, Tika can be easily used to express the ideas that most people want to talk about and by using compound words many complex ideas can also be conveyed.



8 Letters (5 Consonants, 3 Vowels)

a - a, schwa
i - i, e
k - k, g, h
l - r, l
n - n, m
p - p, b
t - t, d
u - u, o

consonant-vowel order, no consonant clusters AT ALL not even with N!


100 Word Dictionary:



(away) from, of, out of, outside, by (means of): pua

toward, at, on, to, in the direction of, for, concerning, about: tua

and, with, together: ku

one, a, an, single, alone, solitude: nua

in, inside, inter-, among, between, interior, internal: ni

(s)he (living things): lilu

you, your, yourself: tupi

as, (similarly) like, same, equal: kuali

I, me, my, myself: puku

have, hand, carry, bring, hold, keep, maintain, capture: kapi

or (else), otherwise: tai

hot, fire, flame, cook, heat: pika

but, however: kitu

some, many, much, more, a lot, very, amount, quantity, number, count: nuita

what, which: kui

can, able, may, allow, enable, legal, permit, ability, talent, skill: puti

other, another, change, edit, alter, modify, different, differ: tipi

all, every, total, whole, complete, universal, universe: tuta

up, above, top, over, high, superior, formal, supreme, upon, sky, celestial: kiali

use, apply, utilize, usage, application: lutila

word, title, name, label: titula

say, speak, talk, language, tongue, dialect: tika

do, make, cause, (power) on, create, build, construct, work, labor, deed, action, act: kia

time, period, age, season (of time): tipu

will, want, must, desire, wish, pray, need: pili

way, via, path, road, direction, method, style, fashion, pattern: pia

write, draw, inscribe: kuipi

thing, stuff, substance, object: kita

two, double, both, couple: tui

look, see, pay attention, view, watch, eye: piti

move, foot, walk, travel, voyage: nupi

sound, phoneme, syllable, sing, song, music, voice, tone, noise: tuna

no, not, negative: nai

know, understand, acknowledge, wisdom, knowledge, science, logic: luki

water, liquid, wet, wash, clean: lakua

person, individual, personal: pikua

people, group, collection, network, society, community, nation, tribe, race (of people): natiu

down, low, under, bottom, below, inferior, humble, informal, ground, soil, dirt, land, (outside) place, floor: lakiu

side, hip, beside, next to, neighboring, adjacent, lateral, near, about (approximately), maybe: latu

new, fresh, renovate, young, juvenile: niu

part, piece, slice, cut, split, divide, fraction: puati

house, (inside) place, home, domestic, building, den, nest, family: panili

live, life, health, experience: pita

great, major, main, important, special, large, wide, huge, fat: kuati

round, circular, circle, around, orbit, cycle, wheel, sphere, ball: pula

good, easy, simple, enjoyable, moral, support, help, assist, correct, OK, healthy, beneficial: puna

body, form, shape, figure, appearance: puana

think, opine, opinion, thought, believe, belief, idea, concept, visualize, mind, head, brain, cerebrum: kapu

line, string, thread, chain, cord, rope: linia

because, reason: puki

bad, evil, wrong, sin, mistake, oh darn! (interjection), unjust, unfair, wicked: nala

man, male, boyfriend, husband: napikua

woman, female, girlfriend, wife: papikua

air, gas, wind, breeze, ventilation: laili

small, tiny, minor, little, a bit, short: tini

play, fun, entertainment, game, recreation, video game, board game: luta

end, stop, finish, pause, wait, quit, edge, final: pinita

light, bright, sun, star, day time: luka

parent, parental, creator, God, holy, religious: patinu

picture, image, map, chart. graph, letter (of alphabet), mark, symbol, character: pitula

Earth, world, planet, terrestrial: puanita

lead, control, steer, govern: kupia

grow, become, effect (result), happen, event (news), expand, increase: katupi

mouth, oral, eat: kunali

door, orifice, gateway, portal, opening, open, hole, crevice: puita

tree, plant, grass, hair, bush, herb, spice (season): lapi

start, begin, genesis, origin, root, seed, semen: kaki

hear, ear, listen, obey, rumor, story, gossip: kuta

press, click, tap, hit, strike, touch: tuka

close, lock, secret, hidden: kikui

real, really?, true, fact, evidence, exist: pila

white, light (color): lai

offspring, child, reproduce (bear a child): pata

paper, page (of a book), ticket, card: tiki

fish, sea creature: puatu

hill, mountain, bump, lump, button: papu

horse, land animal (non-flying birds), dog, cat, beast, cow, mammal: ninali

color, paint: kala

feel, emotion, heart: kuala

bird, flying animal: puitu

black, shadow, dark (color), darkness: lupua

rock, stone, mineral, vitamin, metal: nitali

furniture, sofa, couch, bend, table, chair, dresser: kupa

war, battle, conflict, fight, argument, debate: kuila

lay, relax, rest, meditate, sleep, dream: tuanu

against, opposite: kutua

speed, quickness, fast, hurry: pilu

love, appreciate, accept: lana

money, currency, dollar, wealth, abundance, finance, economy: tulua

cold, freeze, ice, chill, raw: kili

power, energy, spirit, soul, strength, strong, practice, encourage, energize, exercise, charge (with energy): kina

machine, tool, device, computer: tuli

box, container, bowl, cup, plate, thing used to hold stuff: kata

nothing, none, zero, null, nulify, empty, void: nuli

moon, satellite, lunar: luna

nose, face, smell, breathe, breath, scent: pilati

wall, barrier, obstacle, challenge, problem: palia

sexual organ, penis, vagina, testes, to have sex with, sexual intercourse: pina

kill, destroy, exterminate, death, die: nata

stupid, idiot, fool, weird, crazy, strange, drunk, intoxicated: paka

this, that, it (non-living thing), now, present, current: kini

past, before, previous, backward, behind, back, butt, anus, anal, rear (end): kana

future, then, forward, next, ahead, front: paki


Here is the etymology:



kaki - Japanese (haji from hajima)
kala - English (color)
kana - Swahili (zamani)
kapi - Latin (capere)
kapu - Latin (caput)
kata - Spanish (caja)
katupi - English (come to be)
kia - Latin (crea-)
kiali - Latin (cael)
kikui - English (secret)
kili - English (chilly)
kina - Indonesian (jiwa)
kini - Indonesian (kini)
kita - Portuguese (coisa)
kitu - Japanese (kedo)
ku - Latin (cum)
kuala - Latin (corda)
kuali - Latin (aequalis)
kuati - Latin (crass-)
kui - Latin (quid)
kuila - Spanish (guerra)
kuipi - Latin (scribere)
kunali - Italian (consumare)
kupa - English (sofa)
kupia - Spanish (gobierno)
kuta - Spanish (escuchar)
kutua - Latin (contra)
lai - English (white)
laili - Latin (aer)
lakua - Latin (aqua)
lana - Spanish (la amar)
lapi - Latin (arb-)
luka - Latin (lux)
luki - English (logic)
lilu - Latin (illius)
linia - Latin (linea)
luna - Latin (luna)
lupua - Latin (umbra)
luta - Latin (ludo)
lutila - English (utilize)
nai - Japanese (nai)
nala - Latin (mal-)
napikua - Neologism (Latin mas + Latin persona)
nata - Spanish (matar)
natiu - Latin (natio)
ni - Latin (in)
ninali - Italian (animale)
nitali - Latin (metallicus)
nua - Spanish (una)
nuita - Portuguese (muita)
nuli - Latin (nulli-)
nupi - Spanish (mover)
paka - Japanese (baka)
paki - Swahili (basi)
palia - English (barrier)
panili - English (family)
papikua - Neologism (French femme + Latin persona)
papu - English (bump)
pata - Filipino (bata)
patinu - English (paternal)
pia - Latin (via)
pika - Neologism (Spanish fuego + calor)
pikua - Latin (persona)
pila - Latin (vera)
pilati - Latin (spiratio)
pili - English (will)
pilu - Neologism (English speed + Japanese hashiru)
pina - Spanish (pinga)
pinita - Italian (finita)
pita - Latin (vita)
piti - Latin (videre)
pitula - Latin (pictura)
pua - English (from)
puana - Latin (forma)
puanita - Latin (planeta)
puati - Latin (pars)
puatu - French (poisson)
puita - Spanish (puerta)
puitu - English (bird)
puki - Spanish (porque)
puku - Japanese (boku)
pula - Latin (bulla)
puna - Latin (bona)
puti - Spanish (poder)
tai - Finnish (tai)
tika - Latin (dicta)
tiki - English (ticket)
tini - English (tiny)
tipi - Latin (differt)
tipu - Latin (tempus)
titula - Latin (titulus)
tua - English (toward)
tuanu - Latin (somnus)
tui - Russian (dvoe)
tuka - Spanish (tocar)
tuli - English (tool)
tulua - English (dollar)
tuna - Latin (tonus)
tupi - Neologism (Latin tu + Latin tibi)
tuta - Latin (tota)









The name of the language is Tika and Tika means "talk, language, speech" in Tika. There is no word for "to be". You would have to say truly (pila).

puku pila puna = I am good/moral/healthy.

This is a bit ambiguous so if you want to be more specific, you can say "I have a good body" for "I am healthy".

puku kapi puna puana.

So if "I have a good body" means "I'm healthy", how do you say "I have a good body" as in "I'm good looking!?"

That would be: puku kapi puna piti puana.

puna piti means "good looking", "sexy" or "good vision".

tupi piti puku means "you see me". In English, to turn this into a question you would say "Do you see me?". But in this language, you would just say "verb + nai + verb".

so

tupi piti puku means "do you see me".

tupi piti nai piti puku means "do you see me?"

Punctuations of any kind are not used. Only the period is used to end sentences.

Even though it's only 100 words, you can say some pretty complex things such as geology (puanita luki), selenology (luna luki), sociology (natiu luki) and even psychology (kapu luki) because of compounding words.

You can even swear. nala really means bad or even but it can mean a "wrong doing", "mistake", or even "damn it!" or "oh crap!".

Here is how to express time and numbers:

luna puati = minute
luka tipu = date / day
luna tipu = month / lunar time
pika pula = year (one full orbit of the Earth around the Sun)

nuita = number
nua = one
nuli = zero
tui = two
ku = and



luna pula nuita tui ku nuli ku nua ku nuli
The year number two thousand ten

of course, Arabic digits (1234567890) can be used if you don't want to right that all out.

So you can just say "luna pula nuita 2010"

As for the double vowels. They can be pronounced as diphthongs or separately, it doesn't really matter.

So what do you think? Or as said in Tika: kui tupi kapu tua kini tika.




posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by arpgme
 


It doesn't seem that it would be very useful for anything above very basic conversations.
How for example would you translate your OP into this language?

The word puna for example, how am I supposed to define whether I am saying if something is healthy or enjoyable or simple as those three words are definitely not interchangeable and the meaning can't be gleaned from context

Smoking is puna..

How confusing is that?

Edit to add

What about ninali.

Help a Ninali has broken into my Ninali house and eaten all of my Ninali's

It's not a very informative sentence
edit on 24-11-2010 by davespanners because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 08:32 PM
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Sounds a bit Orwellian for me.

The breakdown of cultural language in an all encompassing one world digital language.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


a dog has broken into my chicken house and eaten all my chickens?
but really.. not very informative like you said... yeah.. seems a little useless..



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by notsofast
 


Aha! See! I was actually saying A Lion has broken into my Elephant house and eaten all of my Elephants



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 09:30 PM
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Of course saying "smoking is good", is ambiguous. Even in English, but we use common sense to know that it's obviously not good for your health so the person must be talking about their feelings.

At any rate, you can still make the sentence less ambiguous:

pilati pika pila puna. = Smoking is good. (very ambiguous).

pilati pika kuala puna = Smoking feels good.

pilati pika kuala puna kitu nala tua puana = Smoking is good but not for your body.

if you want to be more specific:

pilati pika kuala puna kitu nala tua pita = Smoking is good but not for your health.



edit on 24-11-2010 by arpgme because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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Doesn't seem like it would be great for conversations about technical matters. As far as a universal language goes, why not Esperanto? There's even a movie done entirely in the language. It's called Incubus.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 10:54 PM
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reply to post by Skid Mark
 


I'll check out the other things you mentioned but yeah. I'll agree with you. I might not like how complex the English language is at times (yes English is my first language) and though I may wish that it would be simplified. But the English language for all its faults gives us a wide variety of ways to make sentences and to say different things.

The English language is also unambiguous so we can say many different things and like they all would mean different things. In a more perfect world it might be nice to have more of a simple language, but we have to err on the side of complexity if we want to be able to have deeper conversations and still have the things we like about it.
edit on 24-11-2010 by Frankidealist35 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 11:01 PM
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What.. no curse words or insults?? Nope... its useless.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by arpgme
 


Why not use tika??? Because it only has ONE HUNDRED WORDS.

We could speak a retarded form of baby-talk english and have the same effect, but your vocabulary is extermely limited.

Is this really how to progress the world?



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 11:18 PM
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with that level of ambiguity, I can't see it being useful for anything past the most basic of transactions - and at that point, you might as well just use the local language from your phrasebook.

try translating this random bit of wiki:



Chondrus crispus, known under the common name Irish moss, or carrageen moss (Irish carraigín, "little rock"), is a species of red algae which grows abundantly along the rocky parts of the Atlantic coast of Europe and North America. In its fresh condition the plant is soft and cartilaginous, varying in color from a greenish-yellow, through red, to a dark purple or purplish-brown. The principal constituent of Irish moss is a mucilaginous body, made of the polysaccharide carrageenan of which it contains about 55%. The plant also consists of nearly 10% protein and about 15% mineral matter, and is rich in iodine and sulfur. When softened in water it has a sea-like odour, and because of the abundant cell wall polysaccharides it will form a jelly when boiled, containing from 20 to 100 times its weight of water.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


nala = damn it!

nupi nata = piss off!

pina pikua = whore, slut

Come on, people. Be creative.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 11:24 PM
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Originally posted by arpgme
reply to post by Advantage
 


nala = damn it!

nupi nata = piss off!

pina pikua = whore, slut

Come on, people. Be creative.


Id feel like a huge geek if I got into a heated argument and had to yell " NUPI NATA PIKUA"!!!!!! I just said it out loud.. no oomph to it.



posted on Nov, 25 2010 @ 12:18 AM
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reply to post by vox2442
 


Here is the translation:

titula kutiu kuipu pila pua kalia tika titula pua lapi. kini kalaikinu. tua kalia tika kini pila tini nitali. kini pila puati pua kipa kala lakua lapi. kini katupi tua nitali lakiu pua talanitiku lakua pinita pua liulupa ku kiali pua lanilika. tipu kini lapi pila niu. kini kapi puna puana. kini puti pila kala tua lapi luka kala tua pika kala tua lupua kiali pika kala tai kiali lupua pika kala. kuati puana pua kini kalia lapi pila nua ku ku tuta puana. kini kia pua linukui tika lapi titula pulitakalitu kalakinanu. kini kapi tui tui nua ku tui tui nua puati pua tuta. kini lapi kapi nua ku nuli puati tua puna kunali ku latu nua ku tui tui nua puati tua nitali kita ku lapi kapi nuita linukui titula nitali lautainu ku tiupua. tipu puana nai pila kina puki lakua kini kapi lakua pilati. tini pita pua puana katupi lakua puana tua tipu kini pika ni lakua. kini paki kapi tui ku nuli tua nua ku nuli ku nuli nuita pua puana kuati pua lakua.



posted on Nov, 25 2010 @ 12:35 AM
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Originally posted by arpgme
reply to post by vox2442
 


Here is the translation:

titula kutiu kuipu pila pua kalia tika titula pua lapi. kini kalaikinu. tua kalia tika kini pila tini nitali. kini pila puati pua kipa kala lakua lapi. kini katupi tua nitali lakiu pua talanitiku lakua pinita pua liulupa ku kiali pua lanilika. tipu kini lapi pila niu. kini kapi puna puana. kini puti pila kala tua lapi luka kala tua pika kala tua lupua kiali pika kala tai kiali lupua pika kala. kuati puana pua kini kalia lapi pila nua ku ku tuta puana. kini kia pua linukui tika lapi titula pulitakalitu kalakinanu. kini kapi tui tui nua ku tui tui nua puati pua tuta. kini lapi kapi nua ku nuli puati tua puna kunali ku latu nua ku tui tui nua puati tua nitali kita ku lapi kapi nuita linukui titula nitali lautainu ku tiupua. tipu puana nai pila kina puki lakua kini kapi lakua pilati. tini pita pua puana katupi lakua puana tua tipu kini pika ni lakua. kini paki kapi tui ku nuli tua nua ku nuli ku nuli nuita pua puana kuati pua lakua.




Care to justify your translation? Just the first two or three lines will suffice. I'd like to see how you're getting specific nouns from this language.



posted on Nov, 25 2010 @ 02:51 AM
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reply to post by Frankidealist35
 


I think that the ambiguity of the English language is funny. Take my name for example. There is a lot of material in the language for tongue in cheek humor.



posted on Nov, 25 2010 @ 02:58 AM
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reply to post by Skid Mark
 


Haha I agree. Ambiguity really does help with humor.
edit on 25-11-2010 by arpgme because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2010 @ 03:08 AM
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Everyone loves making a long skid mark... Its fun and exciting gets the blood rushing,.



posted on Nov, 25 2010 @ 06:09 AM
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puku paki kapi titula pua nua tika tua kini tika ku puku paki kia nupi pitula tua tika.
I am going to be translating stuff into tika and I will make videos concerning the tika language.

kini pila nua taki tua nuita puku patinu ni tika
This right here is the lord's prayer translated into tika

nuita puku patinu pila ni kiali.
nuita puku kia puna tua tupi titula.
nuita puku pili tupi natiu nupi tua.
nuita puku pili tupi pili pila kapi piti.
lilu kapi piti ni puanita ku kiali.
nuita puku pili nuita puku luka tipu kunali kita
ku nuita puku pili tupi lana nuita puku nala kuali nuita puku lana nala pua tipi pikua.
nuita puku pili tupi kapi nuita puku pua tipu pua tupi kapu pua nuita puku puna
ku kapi nuita puku pua nala.
pila.
edit on 25-11-2010 by arpgme because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2010 @ 06:51 AM
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What absolute load of crap?! Why are there lots of Latin and no Greek words? Why Swahili and Indonesian? What have they done for global civilisation?

English is the world’s lingua franca as Latin was before it and Greek before Latin.

It also sounds totally ugly and non-European. It sounds like caveman talk. Pure junk and the person that invented should get another job, like designing Rolls Royce jet engines, Lord knows they need all the help they can get.

Get this One-World-Government-New-World-Order junk out of here.

phucka phoofta phunk

edit on 25-11-2010 by Macdon because: NWO rant.



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