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Sun pulls a complete 360 on it's axis.

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posted on Nov, 23 2010 @ 09:53 PM
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reply to post by favouriteslave
 


The black spot didn't do anything to the sun. It's been in the same spot since the instrument went online in May. It's just a spot on the sensor.




posted on Nov, 23 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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Originally posted by nataylor
reply to post by favouriteslave
 


The black spot didn't do anything to the sun. It's been in the same spot since the instrument went online in May. It's just a spot on the sensor.



Do you have a link to the may footage please


What do you make of this in the same area of the sun close to May, if you don't mind me asking?



edit on 23-11-2010 by BRITWARRIOR because: I'm not telling you LOL

edit on 23-11-2010 by BRITWARRIOR because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2010 @ 10:17 PM
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Originally posted by BRITWARRIOR


Do you have a link to the may footage please


What do you make of this in the same area close to march if you don't mind me asking?



edit on 23-11-2010 by BRITWARRIOR because: I'm not telling you LOL


Here are links to time-lapse movies that cover from May 14th through today: lasp.colorado.edu...

As for that image, I already addressed it here. Short version: that spot isn't on the original image. And that image is not close to March or May. The big date at the bottom indicates it was likely taken on January 27.

edit on 23-11-2010 by nataylor because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2010 @ 10:41 PM
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I can't believe such a thread has gone on this long already. If this was actual the sun just broke the speed of light doing this. There are more than one single lens between the camera and the cosmos.
edit on 23-11-2010 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2010 @ 10:47 PM
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reply to post by nataylor
 

are you talking about radial velocity?



posted on Nov, 23 2010 @ 10:49 PM
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Just so much dust so so much dust



posted on Nov, 23 2010 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by SarK0Y
 

Yes. But rather than dealing with a star as a whole, as when looking for exoplanets, here the velocity varies over the disc of the sun.



posted on Nov, 23 2010 @ 10:53 PM
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Originally posted by nataylor
reply to post by favouriteslave
 


The black spot didn't do anything to the sun. It's been in the same spot since the instrument went online in May. It's just a spot on the sensor.


Ok then do you have any idea what that big ripple was on the surface of the sun?



posted on Nov, 23 2010 @ 11:01 PM
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Originally posted by favouriteslave

Originally posted by nataylor
reply to post by favouriteslave
 


The black spot didn't do anything to the sun. It's been in the same spot since the instrument went online in May. It's just a spot on the sensor.


Ok then do you have any idea what that big ripple was on the surface of the sun?
An exaggerated effect due to an emboss filter.

There was a flare or possible coronal mass ejection in that area at that time in that area. But it has nothing to do with the spot.

And keep in mind that the EVE instruments only look at extreme ultraviolet radiation, which makes up less than 0.01% of total solar irradiance. Further, we're only looking at the MEGS-SAM images, which makes up a tiny fraction of the extreme ultraviolet part of the spectrum.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 12:49 AM
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Are you guys blind? If anything, this video PROVES that there is a spec of dust or debris on the lens, sensor, lens protector, etc, and the camera itself flipped. As far as the camera is concerned, top is still top and bottom is still bottom in relation to the camera whether the camera flips or not.

Prove it to yourself. Take your phone video camera, or any vid cam, put the tip of your finger on the lens where it's only visible in the lower left corner. Your fingertip will be blurry of course. Record. Flip the phone/camera upside down while keeping your fingertip in the same place, the lower left corner of the lens. Play video back. ABRACADABRA. Your fingertip is always showing in the same place in the lower left, while the whole scene in the video flips, just like the sun did. pfffff

END OF MYSTERY.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 05:02 AM
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Originally posted by favouriteslave
Ok so I'll ask again for someone to look at this. Go 5:20 into the video. Forget the dumbkoff talking, it's about the video, the black blob and what it did to the sun! Then explain what happened.


Looks like some sort of a wave coming over the Sun. It happened at 5:20 -- ET in letters (E is letter 5, T is letter 20).

You may have noticed that building 7 (the one that was not hit by an airplane) at WTC imploded at 5:20 -- ET's use time of day to communicate -- as if saying "We did it".

edit on 24-11-2010 by etcorngods because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by nataylor
 

well, but i didn't understand how to spin cam can allow to get something different because optical sensors don't change their initial plane.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by SarK0Y
reply to post by nataylor
 

well, but i didn't understand how to spin cam can allow to get something different because optical sensors don't change their initial plane.



The roll isn't to calibrate the MEGS-SAM imager. It's to calibrate an entirely different device on the spacecraft, the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 03:55 PM
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I contacted the EVE principal investigator about the dark spot. As I expected, they think is dust on the sensor (which is not that unusual). As he pointed out, the SAM data products right now are the result of raw sensor data. At some point in the future, SAM data will go through some processing to produce scientific-quality data and correct for the dust effects.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by nataylor
 

hmmm... accompany to common sense, moving parts have to be filters, lens & polarizers, but no entire device.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by SarK0Y
 


This has been discussed numerous times already. The entire spacecraft does a rotation once every 6 months.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 05:56 PM
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If the "lens flipped", it would have no effect on anything. The lens isn't what processes the image - it's the CMOS sensor inside the camera. I suspect that the black dot is some grime on either the outside lens element or on a filter.

In order for the image of the sun to have flipped * electronically*, the actual camera would have had to rotate - independently of the lens or the lens-shield. Lenses can't be rotated independently of the camera heads. There has to be a seal against the camera body to the lens or you will have a distorted/corrupted image. The fact that the black dot remains stationary speaks to the fact that the lens itself (or the housing) did not move, and due to the way cameras have to operate - the camera didn't rotate independently of the lens either.

So, it leaves two options:
1. The sun actually rotated
2. The image was manipulated after it came out of the camera via a DVE or some other piece of gear. However, given that the clock remains steady and the rate of rotation appears to be somewhat constant, I'd tend to rule out the DVE theory.

In short - who the hell knows? Interesting thread!
edit on 11/24/2010 by atlguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 06:24 PM
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Wow so its still 50/50 i thought this one would have been easy, brings to mind Fatima if true.

Object --> Sun,, "ok now roll over "



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 08:49 PM
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reply to post by nataylor
 



The entire spacecraft does a rotation once every 6 months.

well, let's back to the viddy, do you think it was not edited? but how spot could be stayed on the same place w\o any motions?

reply to post by atlguy
 



If the "lens flipped", it would have no effect on anything.

if lens was damaged, soiled, it would.



posted on Nov, 24 2010 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by atlguy
 


Go back and read up...

The ENTIRE spacecraft rotated, around an axis that is perpendicular to the plane of the imaging sensor.

Too complicated? Then, the camera is locates on the END of the spacecraft, so that as the craft rotates, the AIM of the camera does not change. At all. Stays aimed at the Sun. Centered in the "viewfinder".

This same thing keeps being explained, again and again.

The camera made a 360-degree rotation. NOT the Sun!!!! Any anomaly that is in the pixels, or is debris that is seen within the frame of the image, rotates WITH the camera, and orientation stays the same.

In the video, it is as if YOU are the camera, and did the rotating. But, it was time-lapse, then played back at "faster" speed. SO, it's like you opened your eyes for a second, closed them and rotated 22.5 degrees, opened for another second, closed them, etc....SIXTEEN times, to complete the 22.5 degree "rotation" each time.

When the image that was recorded in your "photographic" memory is played back, it is a series of still images, in quick succession...thus, the ILLUSION that the Sun "rotated".

This is really very, very easy to understand....harder to explain, and harder still because so many are over-complicating it.

Astronomy knowledge is sorely lacking, in modern society. Sad, sad, sad, it is.....


edit on 24 November 2010 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)



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