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Pompeiians Flash-Heated to Death—"No Time to Suffocate"

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posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 09:46 AM
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Plaster cast of a Pompeiian volcano victim, made from a centuries-old hollow in solidified ash


The famous lifelike poses of many victims at Pompeii—seated with face in hands, crawling, kneeling on a mother's lap—are helping to lead scientists toward a new interpretation of how these ancient Romans died in the A.D. 79 eruptions of Italy's Mount Vesuvius.

Until now it's been widely assumed that most of the victims were asphyxiated by volcanic ash and gas. But a recent study says most died instantly of extreme heat, with many casualties shocked into a sort of instant rigor mortis.

"Heretofore archaeologists misinterpreted them as people struggling to breathe and believed they died suffocated by ashes," Mastrolorenzo said. "Now we know that couldn't be." Because of the extreme heat, "when the pyroclastic surge hit Pompeii, there was no time to suffocate," he said. "The contorted postures are not the effects of a long agony, but of the cadaveric spasm, a consequence of heat shock on corpses."


Source: news.nationalgeographic.com...

This one has always had my interest. Ever since my God-Mother came back from a trip to Italy and she showed me her pics of her visit there. I was about 10/11. Has always stuck in my mind. And, I was one to believe what was taught in school.

This theory though, has got some legs to it. After reading it and then looking at some of the remains etc, I have to say I agree with the findings reported here.

Look at this pic:

Can't tell me they were caught off guard and not at the ready-or fleeing. No way. The extreme heat sucked the air away and toated them also. What a way to go. Many look at ease, while others don't. Sad.



cj6

posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 


Those pix r so eerie
they always give me the creeps. That is not a nice way to go



posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 10:54 AM
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Very interesting!

I remember early articles about these casts in the National Geographic. Years later, when I learned about the nuee ardante (pyroclastic flow: en.wikipedia.org...), I became vaguely aware of just how hot the thing was. My original concept, shaped by the Geographic, was that it was a smothering cloud of ash.

I did see a recent documentary that looked at some of the bones and how they were charred, indicating that most died from heat and not from suffocation. It was interesting... and, as you said, sad.



posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 11:10 AM
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Disturbing but eerily like modern art created by nature.

It amazes me how much power our little blue planet has. To think we fear the stars, the men in black and the alien life forms when some of our most dangerous foes are right beneath our feet waiting to swallow us.

I might take an adventure on Amazon and see if I can find some nice books on the topic.



posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by Pinke
 



It amazes me how much power our little blue planet has. To think we fear the stars, the men in black and the alien life forms when some of our most dangerous foes are right beneath our feet waiting to swallow us.


What a way to say it. Well put. Especially for this site. Star



posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by anon72
 
Utterly haunting.

These figures are the 3-dimensional snapshots of lives ending in brief pain and suffocation. It's hard to look at them without somehow sharing the final moments of their deaths. Seeing the children, adults and even sleeping dogs in their final postures is the ultimate time capsule or connection to a time almost 2000 years past.

In some strange way, each person has become a living statue with more significance than they ever would have achieved if they had died naturally and fallen by the wayside of history.



posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 03:08 PM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
reply to post by anon72
 
Utterly haunting.

In some strange way, each person has become a living statue with more significance than they ever would have achieved if they had died naturally and fallen by the wayside of history.



What a lovely way of putting it, they are amazingly haunting.

OP thanks for putting up this thread. S&F



posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 06:38 PM
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Great thread. I visited Pompeii a few years back, it was very cool. Some of their houses, rooms, floors, counter tops and such were so very detailed and beautiful. I always felt that these statue-like bodies had stories to tell, and I felt it even more upon visiting them in person. They were a very artistically detailed culture, and incorporated beautiful mosaics in all sorts of ways into walls, counters, floors. It was amazing. I'm a photographer so I took a bazillion pictures. I realize now that in finding all the details of the city that my eyes were drawn to, I hardly photographed the monster itself, Vesuvius. It's a shame they died the way they did.



posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by SpaceJ
 

I would love to see some of your pics. Can you post some up ?

Yes, they did seem advanced in the areas of personal items and daily life. They seemed to enjoy life so much-by their art and writings etc.



posted on Nov, 18 2010 @ 09:02 PM
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I thought Pompei was also a sex community.
the entire coastal area was a brothel.



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 07:48 AM
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reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 


Interesting you say that. When I was looking for pics and info, a lot of the art work depicted sexual scenes. Nicely done work to.

I didn't want to run the risk of violating T&C but just Google, you'll see.

Guess they were living the High Life when that thing hit.



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 08:57 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 
Well those that believe in the sin or karma side of life,
Could certainly view this city being destroyed at an act of god.
I saw a documentary on this city( I think) and it was in fact a brothel.
If that would be a fact, it gives interest to many other cities that were wiped out
in history, fall of Rome, ect.ect.
Coincidence?



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 09:18 AM
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Wonderful thread! I really like your posts



I always wondered about this myself. It just seemed weird that ash would cause them to be in this position. I would have thought the heat would would have done it. Great info as usual!


I will be in Naples for 3 wks next month for the holidays visiting my bf. I can't wait to go to Pompeii. It is at the top of my list. The first time I ever saw pics of Pompeii and the people it made me have a feeling of emotion I hadn't had before when viewing just an image. It's really sad what happened and seeing them in their last moment where they knew it was the end and were probably scared and terrified is heart breaking.


I will take lots of pics!



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 09:24 AM
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pyroclastic flows.

gotta suck big time but better than ash.

ash is basically glass that you breath and it shreds your lungs till you die.


pyroclastic flow will be very quick.



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 10:16 AM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


Thank you.

Have a great time in Napes. And, please do, get a pic or two.

I think we should have a Travels/Vacation thread on here. With so many of us, going in different directions etc, we could pumb out some serious info on places that may help out a fellow ATSer etc.



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 


Made an album, some are edited & some aren't. I was only 16 when I went, and I didn't have a great camera at the time, but I took lots of pictures anyway. Enjoy.
Pompeii Album



edit on 11/19/2010 by SpaceJ because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by SpaceJ
 


Dude.... you the MAN!!!

Awesome. Totally awesome. Thank you. AND YOU A NOOB to the site. Welcome.

I will look at all of these later on the big screen.

You made my day! You deserve a flag... but I can only star you-once
(

So, do you think that a lot of their art reflect love/sex or more towards daily life ?



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 12:23 PM
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Originally posted by anon72
reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


Thank you.

Have a great time in Napes. And, please do, get a pic or two.

I think we should have a Travels/Vacation thread on here. With so many of us, going in different directions etc, we could pumb out some serious info on places that may help out a fellow ATSer etc.



I agree!! I have asked people to suggest places in and around Naples for me to visit besides Pompeii. When my bf is at work I shall be doing some ATS kind of research on topics
I can't wait! I will have TONS of pics for sure!



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


Be sure to check out SpaceJ's photo album. I think you will like.

Well, maybe you don't want to pre-load your mind with too much so you can focus on what you see.

Man, I wish I was going along.

There is one particular picture that stands out in my mind from when I say my god-mothers photos. I will let you know if you snap it. It is of the people/victims. I haven't found it anywhere while I was searching.



posted on Nov, 20 2010 @ 09:43 AM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


I was visiting family when I went, it was a 2 week trip starting from Milan and we went to many places, so I only spent 2 days in Naples, but...

Some places I recommend checking out on your trip:

Naples National Archaeological Museum (Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli) they have some really cool artifacts and such from Pompeii and the surrounding towns.

I don't know how you plan on getting to Pompeii, but if you take the train Circumvesuviana, you should take the whole ride once through, because it's really beautiful. And the train is a cheap/easy way to see a lot of scenery! There are other stops on that train that have cool places/old towns to explore, it's not just Pompeii, I'd say the all the train stops before Pompeii coming from Naples are worth checking out. Most have a newer town built around it, but shouldn't be too hard to find the old parts, there are some pretty old villas open to the public in Torre Annuziata (Torre Nunziata) and the rest of the towns on the Orange line of this map, on the way to the Pompeii Scavi stop.

Train Map



The lines all start from the terminus in Naples, and then branch off in several places to towns on the Sorrentine peninsula, for which it forms an important commercial artery. The complete journey from Sorrento to Naples takes about one hour. Half-way along the line is the station at Pompeii Scavi, situated about 100 metres from the entrance to the excavations. There are also stops within reasonable walking distance - less than one kilometre - from the Roman city of Herculaneum and the Villa Poppaea (nearest station Torre Annunziata). Parts of the line are very scenic, particularly on the Sorrento peninsula, where the line passes through several tunnels and bridges. There is also a tunnel in Naples to allow the lines to pass under the mainline train station.


In Torre Annuziata there is the remains of the older town Oplontis, where you can visit Villa Poppaea. It's one of the best Roman villa's they've discovered to date. It belonged to Emperor Nero & his 2nd? wife, up until the eruption of Vesuvius. I think there is a newer villa nearby Villa Pompaea that is worth checking out, too, there is signs pointing the way from the time you get off the train stop.

My favorite place in the city of Naples though, a marina, was Santa Lucia right off of Via Partenope, you cannot beat the view from there, seriously! Plus there are many good restaurants, pizza places, and some very good gelato right on that marina. Zì Teresa in particular, best food I had in Naples, and it was a beautiful place to be able to sit and eat, with Vesuvius looming over the bay from the south.

One warning though, keep your purse/wallet/whatever very close to you at all times, there are some ninja pickpockets lurking, especially at train stations (especially in Rome, if you go to Rome). My dad had someone attempt to pickpocket him only about 3 minutes after getting off the train in Rome, needless to say it ruined the Rome part of the trip even though he was able to fend off the pickpocket, and we were on to Naples after that, lol.

Have fun & yes please take lots of pictures, I miss Italy!




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