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Writing A Book Questioning The Death Penalty, Leads To 6 Week Gaol Sentence + $20,000 Fine

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posted on Nov, 16 2010 @ 11:53 PM
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I knew Singapore could be tough but this is ridiculous for a so called modern democracy.

The silly thing is the author of the book says he was given a fair hearing. Oh yeah, he better shut up or will be given the death penalty.

Does anyone know if Singapore is suppose to have freedom of speech? sorry they obviously don't.

www.bbc.co.uk...

A Singapore court has sentenced the UK author Alan Shadrake to six weeks in prison for insulting the judiciary in a book he wrote about the death penalty.
The 76-year-old was found guilty last week, and faces a further trial on defamation charges.
He was also ordered to pay a S$20,000 (£9,585; $15,400) fine.
In his book, Once a Jolly Hangman - Singapore Justice in the Dock, he criticised how the death penalty is used, alleging a lack of impartiality.
Prosecution lawyers had sought a prison term of 12 weeks.
Shadrake offered an apology, which High Court Judge Quentin Loh called "nothing more than a tactical ploy in court to obtain a reduced sentence".
Shadrake's lawyer, M Ravi, said an appeal was unlikely to succeed.
He said his client was in ill health and regretted that he had received no support from the British public.
Mr Ravi added that Shadrake did not have any money and the fine could not be paid.
Judge Loh said that Shadrake would have to serve an additional two weeks in prison if he failed to pay the fine.
Malaysia-based Shadrake was arrested in July when he visited Singapore to launch his book.
The book contains interviews with human rights activists, lawyers and former police officers, as well as a profile of Darshan Singh, the former chief executioner at Singapore's Changi Prison.
It claims he executed around 1,000 men and women from 1959 until he retired in 2006.
"I think I've been given a fair hearing," Shadrake told the media after the verdict was issued last week.
US-based Human Rights Watch and other rights groups had urged Singapore to exonerate the author.
Separately, Shadrake is being investigated by the police for criminal defamation; his passport is being held by the police.

edit on 16-11-2010 by acrux because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 12:20 AM
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I wouldn't say that Singapore is really a democracy. They have had the same party in power since 1959. The country apparently follows the parliamentary democracy system, but I am suspicious about this, given the stats on one-party rule. Of course, the other parties may simply have nothing to off the people.

It is ridiculous to be threatened for questioning an aspect of government or law, in a real democracy.

ETA: Interesting article on the state of democracy in Singapore. The opposition party claims the ruling party bribed and threatened people into voting for it.
www.opendemocracy.net...
edit on 17-11-2010 by InvisibleAlbatross because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 12:37 AM
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The opposition party claims the ruling party bribed and threatened people into voting for it.


Unfortunately this happens in just about every country on earth by both sides of politics. Sad isn't it.
edit on 17-11-2010 by acrux because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by acrux
 


It most certainly is.

I am still blown away that this guy claimed he received a fair trial. Perhaps he is just saying it was as far as it could have been in an unfair system.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 12:46 AM
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reply to post by InvisibleAlbatross
 


He probably said that so they wouldn't give him a longer sentence or maybe they'd give him the death penalty instead.

edit on 17-11-2010 by acrux because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 12:47 AM
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I guess the author's sentance proves his point about the justice system.
Considering how many people died to free the area from the Japanese in wwll it kinda makes it look like they died for nothing like most soldiers do.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 12:52 AM
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Originally posted by Danbones
I guess the author's sentance proves his point about the justice system.
Considering how many people died to free the area from the Japanese in wwll it kinda makes it look like they died for nothing like most soldiers do.


The funny thing people say when they call them the glorious dead.

I bet the dead are greatful knowing they can happily decompose under a flag of freedom.

All war is sick & senseless.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 12:52 AM
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ZOMGG WE NEED TO INVADE THEM AND RAIN DOWN BOMBS TO "LIBERATE THEIR PEOPLE"!!!111

That's why we went to war in Iraq.... right??? RIGHT???



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 04:09 AM
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reply to post by acrux
 


He did it in their country. Best analogy is if you are going to play Stickball in Brooklyn, you better know the rules. A democracy only entails people the ability to vote for their government. Beyond that internal politics will vary, including degrees on whats considered Free Speach and whats taboo.



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