It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The links between hypnosis and Buddism

page: 2
2
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 11:26 AM
link   
meditation is the exercise for the very act of being. it is be-ing aware of all that is around, and within oneself. everything from ones breathing and blood flow, to the wind, and the perceived solid state of atoms surrounding, including, but not limited to, ones thoughts. The result is a clear mind, the activity is not.

if one can achieve such a state through hypnosis, so be it.

enlightenment's meaning is lost in the rubble from whence it came. it is a meaningless term.
edit on 29-1-2011 by sinohptik because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:11 PM
link   
reply to post by krzyspmac
 


Yo, your right buddhist meditation has nothing to do with what I said but the Buddha did not practice Buddhist mediation, he practiced samatha-vipassana meditation which is identical in form to hypnosis.

Case in point, the Buddha went out to try to find awakening, now his goal would have influenced his subconscious and all that entails, IMHO

Peace



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by yyyyyyyyyy
Hi everyone,

You probably did not read my others posts




Wow...you're psychic. It's true. I didn't.

Now that I think about it, yes, meditation is self-hypnosis. At least it sure involves exactly the same techniques as self-hypnosis. I always knew those Chinese were up to something.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:16 PM
link   
reply to post by sinohptik
 


Enlightenment to me is like a path. Previously I had only heard of the path, then i started taking some steps down it, now I am a way down it and the path is illuminated so I can see to the end but still have not physically reached the end.

Case in point, why do people act how they do?!? People are always making decisions based on emotion and good/bad decisions are usually made due to the happy/unhappy state of the person making them.

Unhappy people make bad decisions. With this info its like a mini-enlightenment because I understand so much more about human behaviour. Who'd have thought but it turns out Freud was pretty much correct in his subconscious block theory.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 12:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by ChiForce
Nonsense......the ultimate goal in Buddhism is to obtain Nirvana. A state in which you can only achieve through meditation and opening of the chakras, total 7 major ones. What is chakras? Life energy that spins and vibrates at its own frequency. It isn't talking here. Is an actual heat sensation, pulsing, one feels. When you get to the 6th chakras, your third eye is open and you are confronting major moral issues dealing with your life (past and present). Even finding yourself in situations that you normally don't see yourself to be in. Another effect with opening the third eye is that your meridians are generally fully open, not blocked. You would feel the whole body pulsing as a result, which leads to better health.

Hypnosis? I don't remember reading up on hypnosis that can help you with your health or being used to rise your Kundalini energy.


It amazes me that people refer to things like chakras and 3rd eyes and yet when pressed, they all simply dismiss the need to qualify these things beyond saying that if one is enlightened then one doesn't need to ask what proof there is of chakras and 3rd eyes. I mean, even "life energy" is uselessly vague as a term, and means (very likely) something different to three different people who honestly believe that they can define it. We had that same thing happen in a thread here about "Oneness". At least 4 very distinct and different descriptions of what that term means.

As far as hypnosis is concerned, all that you just described is similar to what has been documented over the years when people have been placed under hypnosis. Heat, pulsations, pain, pain relief, expanded awareness, and even complete hallucinatory immersions; all have been the result of hypnotic suggestion and documented thoroughly.

Call it what you wish, but the OP has a very valid point here. If you build a chest of drawers with a mirror on top of it, and one person calls it a dresser, while another person calls it a bureau, it's still a chest of drawers with a mirror on top of it. It's made of wood and according to the layout plans that either of these people would agree be used to build what it is that they've described. If meditation and self-hypnosis, or guided meditation and hypnosis, are accomplished by using the exact same behavioral/simulative processes, then the brain will react the exact same (within a reasonable variance) to each whether you call it Buddhism or hypnotherapy.
edit on 1/29/2011 by NorEaster because: (no reason given)

edit on 1/29/2011 by NorEaster because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 01:29 PM
link   
Shamatha & Vipassana is Buddhist Meditation.

It is taught that Shamatha & Vipassana of Buddhist Meditation, is that which can lead to seeing Reality; whereas hypnosis is mere suggestion, which only attempts to trick the subconsciousness.

Hypnotism could possibly have some temporary benefits; but like laboratory-concocted forms of contemporary medicine, it only temporarily deals with symptoms without addressing causes.

Real Buddhist Vipassana is taught to be Conscious Imagination, which is Objective Clairvoyance.

Hypnotism is subjective "imagination", or rather it is fantasy more or less. It is subjective clairvoyance.

Basically, hypnotism lacks two main ingredients which are key elements for real Buddhist Meditation: Comprehension and Will-Power (which is not to be confused with exertion).

As for the Chakras, the Hindu teachings of Yoga and Tantra usually address the Seven main Chakras; and Buddhist Yoga and Tantra usually addresses Six of the main Chakras. Although there are said to be many more Chakras than the main Six or Seven.



edit on 29-1-2011 by Tamahu because: edited text



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 03:00 PM
link   
Although I am not an expert in either Buddhism or hypnosis, I was under the impression that one of the purposes of the practice of meditation was to strengthen our own mind and willpower.

It would seem that if we allow another to hypnotize us, we have surrendered control of our mind to the hypnotist, which defeats the purpose of meditation right from the outset.



Hyp-nosis might awaken aspects of the mind, personality, and ego, but it puts the Consciousness to sleep - and the Buddha talks about making the conscious mind quiet and still


The "conscious mind" refers to normal waking consciousness where the mind is dominated by worldly thoughts and cares. In meditation, we try to still these constant thoughts so that we may become super-conscious using the finer spiritual faculties of seeing and hearing of the higher inner mind.
edit on 29-1-2011 by mysticnoon because: typo



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 03:25 PM
link   
In the Gnostic tradition, the word Consciousness is employed differently than it is in contemporary psychology. Contemporary psychology often confuses the Consciousness with the mind. In Gnosis, the Consciousness is taught to be Awareness that is superior to the mind.

The Consciousness in the context of Gnosis is in a way basically synonymous with Awareness itself, as related to the following Buddhist terminologies:

Jnana (Yeshe), Prajna (Sherab), and Vidya (Rigpa).

In the context of the Gnostic teachings, the Consciousness is the Awareness that is beyond the mind, and beyond the subconsciousness, beyond the unconsciousness, and beyond the infraconsciousness.

In Buddhism, there is a difference between mind (sems) and the Nature of Mind (Sems-Nyid). In the teachings of Gnosis the Consciousness is said to be a function of Sems-Nyid (the Nature of Mind), because the Consciousness is beyond the mind (sems).

This being said, in Meditation we still and quiet the mind, in order to Awaken the Consciousness as to Realize the Nature of Mind and its qualities which are: Jnana (Yeshe), Prajna (Sherab), and Vidya (Rigpa).

Note that this is a simplified, albeit imperfect explanation; as I'm certainly not a Master of Meditation.



edit on 29-1-2011 by Tamahu because: edited text



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 03:40 PM
link   
reply to post by yyyyyyyyyy
 


What is the difference between hypnotism and other forms of trance induction? I wonder if brain scans will clarify the differences. Isn't the essence of buddhism mindfullness and certain forms of abstinence?

Just thoughts
edit on 29-1-2011 by tiger5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 06:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by yyyyyyyyyy
reply to post by sinohptik
 


Enlightenment to me is like a path. Previously I had only heard of the path, then i started taking some steps down it, now I am a way down it and the path is illuminated so I can see to the end but still have not physically reached the end.


If you would not mind, i have some questions about your perspective
To clarify, these are not set up as a debate, so please dont take it that way. This one truly wishes to know your perspective on these questions. Simply put, it is how we all, in these finite bodies, learn. Ill just ask questions about your perspective on "life" and then offer my own. I view both as equally valid


So, at which point does one find themselves making the all important transition from "have not" to "have?" At which point does one shift their perspective from not physically reaching the end, to physically reaching the end? Do you see it as something that has not always been there, and was only covered by perspective, or something that must be physically achieved through the willpower of the self and was never there to begin with? If that is the case, where does this "enlightenment" arise from?

This one sees enlightenment is contained within the one on the path, realizing the path and who/what travel it are one and the same. The thoughts, emotions, and actions involved are part of the same movement and action of a base. In this respect, i view enlightenment as simply baseline "being." bringing conscious, mindful movement to the continuous act of ones life. Such a thing can be achieved through meditation, or cutting vegetables, or self-hypnosis. I do not see it as something that one "achieves," but more that one realizes the quantification of even the physical realm is impossible on a continuous basis. So, i view it as more of aligning ones perspective (regardless of what is contained within, i.e. emotions, thoughts, actions) with what is already happening.


Case in point, why do people act how they do?!? People are always making decisions based on emotion and good/bad decisions are usually made due to the happy/unhappy state of the person making them.

Unhappy people make bad decisions. With this info its like a mini-enlightenment because I understand so much more about human behaviour. Who'd have thought but it turns out Freud was pretty much correct in his subconscious block theory.


If an unhappy person decides to be happy, what type of decision is that? If one is basing their decisions off of fleeting emotions derived from the path, and not a core, base, conscious, mindful state of be-ing ("originating" in the one on the path), can consistency (perhaps conceptualized as "enlightenment") truly be achieved? "What" is the system/being that experiences these fluctuations, and do you view it as less important than the experiences that arise from that system/being?

Sorry for all the questions, i dont like to assume how another views the world. That does not necessarily mean that this one does not ever do that, but it is something i am working on, as you can see



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:27 PM
link   
reply to post by krzyspmac
 


Yeah, I guess it boils down to what you think the Buddha taught. It's easy to have a disagreement when you are using the same words but talking of different things.

But my reading is the Buddha taught about suffering and the removal of suffering and hypnosis teaches the same thing whilst at the moment meditation is not providing any frame work to remove pain both emotional and or physical.

That is why for me, hypnosis is much better than meditation because hypnosis fulfills the criteria of the 8-fold path more satisfactorily than current meditation practice. Of course, the 8 fold path is better than hypnosis as it encompasses its message but the key is meditation is not the be all and end all of Buddhism.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 06:53 PM
link   
reply to post by sinohptik
 


So, at which point does one find themselves making the all important transition from "have not" to "have?"
I think we have it from birth but it takes a bunch of stuff to realise we have it and some never do, providing the have/have not idea you are talking about is some kind of enlightenment, for example we all have experience of time going fast when having fun, so why not flip this idea and when in pain make 1 hour go in the mental time of 10 seconds


At which point does one shift their perspective from not physically reaching the end, to physically reaching the end? Do you see it as something that has not always been there, and was only covered by perspective, or something that must be physically achieved through the willpower of the self and was never there to begin with? If that is the case, where does this "enlightenment" arise from?
I hope to use hypnosis like I've seen many times to develop a glove anesthesia to remove physical pain and use this as a spring board to my more pressing mental issues. Enlightenment arises in the brain, its the ability to remove pain and further more and its important the removal of craving and suffering.

...So, i view it as more of aligning ones perspective (regardless of what is contained within, i.e. emotions, thoughts, actions) with what is already happening? I agree, its like in hypnosis, at the moment your eyes are open, your reading this, your probably not wearing a hat, part of you wants to go to the loo in a few hours, your heart is beating, you were not aware of your breath and I'm curious to know when you will next forget about your breathing, and does your subconscious want your left hand to rise or your right hand and would I be right to say if you think of something happy will you smile or really smile or something else and I dont' know whether the weather outside the window is warm or cool but I know the moon revolves around the earth and I guess you are not interested in harming other people which is a good thing and its possible to relax and really let go but only in a way which is confortable for you and I don't want you understand all the things I am saying, only the things that your subconscious finds acceptable.

If an unhappy person decides to be happy, what type of decision is that? Good decision. Unhappy poeple can make good decisions too, like making sure they turn off the stove, its a framework and not a rigid rule.

If one is basing their decisions off of fleeting emotions derived from the path, and not a core, base, conscious, mindful state of be-ing ("originating" in the one on the path), can consistency (perhaps conceptualized as "enlightenment") truly be achieved? Can enlightenment be achieved but those whose minds are confused? I don't think so but its an easy thing to teach and to correct incorrect behavior.

"What" is the system/being that experiences these fluctuations, and do you view it as less important than the experiences that arise from that system/being? Don't understand.

Sorry if this is not the answers your looking for and its fine to be honest on ATS, I am not married to these ideas and I don't have a book out, in some ways I was looking for people to correct me to improve my understanding.

So tell us what you think and soz about the late reply



new topics

top topics



 
2
<< 1   >>

log in

join