Need help deciding on a handgun

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posted on Nov, 14 2010 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by v3_exceed
 


I am a guitarist lol. I do kind of see what your saying. However if you do it a couple of times it should be no problem.




posted on Nov, 14 2010 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by TorqueyThePig
reply to post by v3_exceed
 


I am a guitarist lol. I do kind of see what your saying. However if you do it a couple of times it should be no problem.


I have disassembled a Glock a number of times, which is why it got the thumbs down on the dis-assembly. Not so much for me, but the OP suggested that he and his wife were looking for hand guns. Compared to the Springfield, the Beretta and the Trojan the Glock is indeed tough on the fingers. Way worse for lady fingers I think, as we hope the ladies have soft gentle hands


..Ex



posted on Nov, 16 2010 @ 01:43 PM
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a rossi revolver chambered for 44 special rounds wirh a snub nose. i used to have one it iseasy to conceal and has good stopping power up close



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 01:41 AM
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in a 9mm go glock, in a 40, go with ruger, sig,taurus,if concelment is not a factor, glock longslides are great, any caliber. just dont get a regular glock in 40, cops are getting rid of them , jamming and parts breakage,glock just bored out the 9mm bbl to 40 and the 40 is too much for the 9mm slide and frame, but a glock long slide in 40 works great more weight in the slide.S&W is whore of the gun industry, they are every where you look and overated, and too expensive for what you really get.Revolvers do jam!! get some dirt ,grit or even pocket lint in to mechanism and it will jam up. no military issues revolvers anymore just for that reason, a jammed revolver requires a armorer to dissasemble and reassemble.unless its a RUGER, thats the only make of revovler that a typicaly gun owner can take down clean and reassemble.so if you go revolver RUGER is only game in town.
edit on 19-11-2010 by madokie because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2010 @ 06:33 PM
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As i stated in another thread i own a Glock, 45 cal.. awesome firearm!! modifiable!! accurate!! lightweight... etc.. i also have a Springfield MI 1911 45 acp (for my state law that reads . i can conceal or open carry a handgun loaded and chambered in my vehicle for defense puposes).. its in my truck..i love them both... i suggest a 45 cal for you... and for your girl.. a 357.... im not a fan of the 9mm.. its ballistics does'nt compare to a 45 or a 357...ive shot 9mm into a old freezer.. almost went thru the door... both of my 45's thru the door and almost exited.. my desert eagle 44 mag, lol... thru and exit... if ya dont like either of those calibers.... try a 40... glock, springfield, sig arms..



posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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First things first, go to several gun stores, or a gun show, and put your hands on as many guns as possible. Go to www.corneredcat.com and check out their advice on how to find the pistol that fits you. It will save you money in the long run.

If you are not an experienced shooter I would recomend a compact or subcompact hand gun in 9mm. The recoil is managable, the ammo is cheap, and you can find ammo nearly everywhere. There is no need to special order or go to a specialty store. If you want to go practice and need to pick some up you can stop at Wal Mart.

From my experience I would recomend the Springfield XD compact or subcompact in 9mm. You can find one for about $450 if you look around. I also like the Bersa 9mm Ultra Compact. You can find one for about $360 if you look around.

A .38spl is good choice. A snub nose is best for carry but can be intimidating to first timers. The kick and flash can be disturbing. However you can pick up a 3 or 4 inch police/security trade in for less than $300 and have a good home defense gun.

Go handle as many as possible. Then go to a range that rents guns and try as many as possible. Then practice, practice, practice. Practice not just your shooting but also your draw. A concealed gun that you can not draw quickly and cleanly is useless.

Nobody can tell you what the best cc gun is for you. That is your choice. I always recomend starting with a subcompact or compact 9mm. I also recomend staying away from the pocket 9mms. The Kel Tec PF-9 and P-11 are great for experienced shooter, but novices should look else where. They will probably be put off by the recoil and finger abuse.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 07:59 PM
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Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
reply to post by jlafleur02
 


I would recommend the Desert Eagle Action Express, .50 calibre. It is not to heavy, is very reliable, just watch for the firing pin, they are prone to breakage.

If you attach a red dot scope and an extended magazine, you have a very powerful handgun that is still rather easy to handle and fire.

VvV


Come on. This person is a first time shooter and money is an issue and your going to suggest
a Desert Eagle Action Express, .50 caliber....... NOT!

Expensive and more recoil than a non-experienced shooter can handle well.

People who don't know what their talking about shouldn't give new shooters advice. You can get people hurt!

For a new shooter till you get more experienced I would NOT recommend a semi-auto handgun.

My advice would be to get a Ruger SP101 with a 4" barrel You can shoot the lower powered .38 special ammo till you get comfortable (and the wife also) then move up to the .357. mag. rounds.

And yes I am an experienced shooter. I am a NRA Certified safety instructor, have been shooting & hunting for
36 years and have owned and shot probably a hundred different firearms. I currently own 6 handguns and 17 long guns.



posted on Dec, 21 2010 @ 05:39 PM
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my first handgun was a bersa .380 thunder $250, the thing never jammed stove piped or double fed after 1000 rounds or so. my second was a kel-tec pf-9 9mm which cost about the same and with the same results. Both are pocket pistols and i'm looking to get something bigger in the future, but for now i am very satisfied with my purchases. Also if you are goign to carry or use for home defense and not just plinking, might i recommend some hydra-shok rounds, not something to go to the range with but when it comes down to business they get the job done.



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 01:09 PM
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If you can find it for a good price (



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by mwood
And yes I am an experienced shooter. I am a NRA Certified safety instructor, have been shooting & hunting for
36 years and have owned and shot probably a hundred different firearms. I currently own 6 handguns and 17 long guns.


I know we're both guys but will you marry me?


/TOA



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by The Old American

Originally posted by mwood
And yes I am an experienced shooter. I am a NRA Certified safety instructor, have been shooting & hunting for
36 years and have owned and shot probably a hundred different firearms. I currently own 6 handguns and 17 long guns.


I know we're both guys but will you marry me?


/TOA

You don't love him, you love his guns!

By the way, OP, you should get a 9mm Berretta PX4 Storm sub-compact. AWESOME weapon, and it has a picatinny rail so you can put attachments on it!



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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reply to post by jlafleur02
 


I recommend the pocket howitzer and the
9mm spunk shells.



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 02:36 PM
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I carry a Polish P64. I bought at Cabela's $179.00 on sale.
Bullets are Markov 9mm x 18mm. Box of 50rds on sale $10-13 dollars.
Double action mechanism, I like the safety feature. The trigger pull is not
very smooth. The sites are small and hard to see thu.
If I have to use it, it is point and shoot, and hope I walk away.

I have a Glock, I do not carry it, because of the safety is on the trigger.



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 02:46 PM
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Sig Sauer P239 in .40S&W - it's what the secret service and FBI carry. Expensive but incredibly reliable. Only one stovepipe in over 10,000 rounds and it was with really crappy reloaded ammo.



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 02:56 PM
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Perfect for home defense!

For a first gun why not go for the big guns?

Humor aside, I would want a gun that I would really love owning and shooting like the wilson 45 1911

This one I am not sure of the exact model, but a beautiful gun that you will adore owning and shooting.

Most people would run away rather than face down any of these, so concealment might not be an issue..




posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 02:59 PM
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Plenty to love about Sig Sauers. Plenty of variety and highly reliable and accurate. Find one used and you are ready to rock and roll. They actually get better with use. The recoil is very manageable and their are plenty of options within each model of pistol.

I've owned a P229 and currently a P239 in 9mm. Both I bought certified used. I also own a Springfield XD in 9mm. I love that one as well.

Hey you could also grab one of these


The Unibombers homemade piece.
edit on 30-12-2010 by jibeho because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by 19rn50
I carry a Polish P64. I bought at Cabela's $179.00 on sale.
Bullets are Markov 9mm x 18mm. Box of 50rds on sale $10-13 dollars.
Double action mechanism, I like the safety feature. The trigger pull is not
very smooth. The sites are small and hard to see thu.
If I have to use it, it is point and shoot, and hope I walk away.

I have a Glock, I do not carry it, because of the safety is on the trigger.



Just curious as to why you wouldn't want to carry this gun? IMO,even though I'm not a huge glock fan,this is one of the really nice features of the gun. One less thing to do or worry about if you need to deploy the weapon in a hurry,and they have proven to be safe and reliable.



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by madokie
 
i need to add to my post,about revolvers,they are good guns and very reccomended for newbies starting out,but for CC dont get one rebardless of caliber with a short barrel, the 38 special is a prime example, they used to make them with the shortest barrel the gun maker could fit on the gun,1 1/2 inch, i have a 1972 Law Enforcement Hangun Digest in which they test various guns and ammo ,one was a snubnose 38 special
with the afore mentioned short barrel,and the ammo was a round nose lead 158 grain standard velocity (600fps out of short barrel)they shot a driver side window of a late 1950's car and it fractured the window but didnt penatrate from 5 feet away, in book they even showed a pic of bullet on the ground perfetly mushroomed.you need velocity from 38 and other non magnum revlover rounds,and longer barrel lenght is only way to get it,3" is as short as i would go, preferably 4" ,a heavy barrel is also good also helps keep muzzel rise to a minumum and longer sight radius means better chance of hitting your target.ruger sp101 is good choice,taurus make them with longer barrels, but colt and s&w dont make their 5 shot guns with longer barrel..it used to be that you had to have short barrel for CC or the longer barrel would show, but now with better holsters that is not the case,its still the grip and thicker cylinders that give away the revlover in CC .
edit on 1-1-2011 by madokie because: (no reason given)
edit on 1-1-2011 by madokie because: (no reason given)
edit on 1-1-2011 by madokie because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 01:17 AM
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The gun you need is the one you feel really good about, and the one that's with you all the time. Winter, Summer, Fall, and Spring.

Since this is your first conceal handgun, keep things simple. Smaller sometimes is more.

Go to a gun dealer, and ask to see the Ruger LCP. It's small, it's smooth for concealed carry, it's reliable, it's accurate, and it's inexpensive.

It shoots a .380 in a double action trigger pull.

Look, I carry a Kimber 1911 Ultra CDP II in .45 with a 3" barrel. Still, at the end of the day, I know it's there, and I'm still a bit limited on how I must dress.

The Ruger LCP can be carried in your pocket.

It's a great weapon for starters, and great for women.

Start there. You're not going to be shooting car windows, making 150-meter long range shots, nor gunfighting in the Alaska polar regions where everyone's wearing lots of thick skinned clothing.

The best part is that later, you can upgrade that Ruger LCP with a Crimson Trace laser. Ask the gundealer to show it to you. You'll love it when you see it.

Everyone has favorites - everyone has prejudices - but everyone also needs a neutral starting point.

Over the Christmas holidays, both my sons on purchased LCP's, my neice bought one, my nephew's new wife bought one, and two friends bought them.

They love them.

Later, you can go bigger, but you'll never get anything as reliable, concealable, and simple to operate as the Ruger LCP.

There's a reason that they're selling a ****load of them as I write this.

Good luck.



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 06:18 AM
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reply to post by xxclaro
 

Greetings
The Glock Truly is a great gun for the money.
Very quick at getting rounds off, and is very accurate gun.
I like the P64 with the all steel frame. The few seconds it takes me to
switch off the safety. Gives me a time to think. I would NOT take joy
in shooting anyone. With the Glock there dead right now. There are a few
video's on youtube. Where people have accidentally shot themselves with a Glock.
Safety is very important to me, I carry 95% of the time.





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