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Plasma Stealth (does it glow?)

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posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 03:49 PM
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Plasma stealth is being kicked around alot these days. Not knowing enough physics my question is this:

Does a aircraft with a plasma steatlh generator glow or increase its IR signature?




posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 04:05 PM
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Here's a link to answer your question. It doesn't glow. The Russians probably have the edge now in this technology.

www.aeronautics.ru...

R. O'Neal
www.onealclan.com



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 05:58 PM
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In that article you linked about the plasma stealth it said the plasma would most likely glow in the dark



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 07:17 PM
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From all of the stuff I have read on it, yes it would glow.



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 09:04 PM
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from all that i know yes it dose glow anf the IR signature would go crazy its like a giant fire ball to a heat seeking misslie.



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 12:11 AM
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Well some things have lower melting points than others. An ordinary flame is plasma so it probably wouldn't give of much more heat than ordinary thrust if something with a low melting point is used. At its coldest matter is solid, then when it gets hotter it turns to liquid then air then plasma. Water is a good example of this priciple.

[edit on 7/2/2004 by cyberdude78]



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 01:58 AM
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a flame doesn't have nearly the plasma needed to cover the jet so it would require something much hotter and more powerful hence the need for a lot of energy to wrap the plane in plasma.



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 02:01 AM
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This is true but my point is it doesn't actually have to be hotter than even the aircrafts engine. So it doesn't have to be extremely high temperature. As for not glowing I have no idea how you would do that.



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 04:27 AM
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Ok say its not hotter than the exhaust of the engine but when you are coming in straight with another jet you cant get a good lock on the exhaust unless you are behind the jet but with plasma since its all around you can get a lock on it with a heat seeking missile from all angles right?



posted on Jul, 3 2004 @ 01:09 AM
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Thats true except plasma doesn't have to be very hot. I'll explain that one more time. Take gas for example. Water has to be hot to turn into gas (steam) yet say nitrogen is a gas at the liquid temperature of water. In order for nitrogen to be liquid it needs to be cold but at those low temperatures water is solid. So you see it doesn't have to be very hot. Not even that warm. And its hard to tell a difference since the engine dominates the structure of most aircraft. So most of the aircraft shows up for heat seekers at all angles. So its not like plasma adds to the problem a whole lot.



posted on Jul, 3 2004 @ 02:56 AM
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Originally posted by cyberdude78
Thats true except plasma doesn't have to be very hot. I'll explain that one more time. Take gas for example. Water has to be hot to turn into gas (steam) yet say nitrogen is a gas at the liquid temperature of water. In order for nitrogen to be liquid it needs to be cold but at those low temperatures water is solid. So you see it doesn't have to be very hot. Not even that warm. And its hard to tell a difference since the engine dominates the structure of most aircraft. So most of the aircraft shows up for heat seekers at all angles. So its not like plasma adds to the problem a whole lot.


F-22 is designed so that the engine heat (without afterburner) is only visible direct from behind(nozzles)



posted on Jul, 3 2004 @ 07:12 PM
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The F-22 doesn't need that no aircraft will never get that close to see the exhaust of the raptor



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 01:38 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
The F-22 doesn't need that no aircraft will never get that close to see the exhaust of the raptor



Don't forget about SAMs



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 01:42 AM
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The plasma itself would not be hot, plasmas have a very wide range of temperatures, and it looks like the one used to make the shield would be about room temperature. As for the glow, it looks like it would glow purple. Here is a sight talking about plasma shields and shows a picture of the cold plasma.



www.space.com...

[edit on 5-7-2004 by greenkoolaid]



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 04:55 AM
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About the sams the F-22 has the ability to go behind enemy lines and shoot down sams and cruise missiles
what more can I say its a killing machine



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
About the sams the F-22 has the ability to go behind enemy lines and shoot down sams and cruise missiles
what more can I say its a killing machine




in theory

wait and see what happens to it in a real battlefield.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:26 PM
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Actually it was built to do that to go behind enemy lines and protect our current aircraft from sams and cruise missiles so its not theory but fact and the USAF has tested it with our sams and cruise missiles before they make that claim.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 10:38 PM
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I wonder why cold fusion can't be made since plasma can be room temperature. But anywho theres a thread about the F-22 being able to go behind enemy lines. I'll post a link to the thread once i find it.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 10:39 PM
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Heres the link.
www.abovetopsecret.com...
Nice plane isn't it.



posted on Jul, 5 2004 @ 12:50 AM
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Dont things have to be hot to fuse so there can be no cold fusion you know you have to heat up to chemicals to fuse them or am I wrong chemistry was never my forte



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