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Depression is NOT a Real Disorder

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posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by badw0lf
 


sarcasm , i get it ,

but it still dont change the workabouts of "your" brain,

constant seretonine inbalance or usage of it leads you to get depressed

and constant bombardment of "fear" triggers hormones withinn you and if you are on overdrive then
the most likely scenario is that you have a brake down somewhere along the run ,

but depressed (seretonine)can often be confused with boredom(adrenaline) and both can be attributed to growing up ,

but then there was freud i do belive that said that constant bombardement of missery in forms of starving children and what not animals in cages and our inability to do anything about it would lead to mass deppression ,
and that we would be willing to give up anything in the long run just to make it go away ,

but as siad in both cases its out side stimulus and the inability to do anything about it that drives us to the sates we feel,

and only you can change how you precive the world ,..




posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by zerbot565
 


*sigh*


Researchers have noted differences in the brains of people who are depressed as compared to people who are not. For instance, the hippocampus, a small part of the brain that is vital to the storage of memories, appears to be smaller in people with a history of depression than in those who've never been depressed. A smaller hippocampus has fewer serotonin receptors. Serotonin is a calming brain chemical known as a neurotransmitter that allows communication between nerves in the brain and the body. It's also thought that the neurotransmitter norepinephrine may be involved in depression.

One thing is certain -- depression is a complex illness with many contributing factors. The latest scans and studies of brain chemistry that show the effects of antidepressants help broaden our understanding of the biochemical processes involved in depression. As scientists gain a better understanding of the cause(s) of depression, health professionals will be able to make better "tailored" diagnoses and, in turn, prescribe more effective treatment plans.


Source

The assertion that depression is somehow self-inflicted is at best misinformed and, at worst, patronizing and abrasive.

Depression does not equal "emo" mmmmmkay.

~Heff



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:44 PM
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reply to post by ThichHeaded
 


I knew you would have some sort of creative skills, I am an artist as well, it seems so many people that suffer from depression are artist,

community.webshots.com...

where do I find your art here, I don't know how to access this,

thanks



edit on 013030p://bSunday2010 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


but what you are now saying with that article
is that depression in mearly a syndrome of multiple factors
and that brain hormone inbalance leads to it, .

and im saying that outside stimulus lead to hormone imbalance

so what are we arguing ?



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by badw0lf
 


I know exactly what you are talking about,

Now the problem with the xanax is memory loss for me, I have to check and double check my post to see what I have posted,

Ya gotta find a sense of humor though, if that's possible, I think that comes with age, stop taking myself and everyone else so seriously.

Panic attacks and anxiety disorders also tend to affect perfectionist,



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


pick a gallery any one..
They are all images of things I have done in 3d..



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by zerbot565
 


I am arguing that the best and brightest minds can only guess at some of the causes of depression and that they readily admit that they don't yet understand the causes or mechanisms.

Dismissing it as situational is unsubstantiated.

~Heff



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by ThichHeaded
 





I am accomplished... I am good and I am awesome at what i do.. everything from art to hating myself..


That's where the perfectionist comes into play,




posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by ThichHeaded
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


pick a gallery any one..
They are all images of things I have done in 3d..


alrighty thanks



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 01:55 PM
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I've been diagnosed with clinical depression for 8 years. During that time I figured out I was a depressive most of my life, since about my senior year in HS. I just figured everyone felt just as bad sometimes, and as my parents were Depression Era people, my generation was just told to suck it up. I also played football for a very tough program in the highest division in Arkansas, and if the bone wasn't sticking out, we played. I worked every day and managed to get by until the early 90s when I began to be sleep deprived. Some experts say that is the first real sympton of a future eventual and severe onset. Next was diabetes, which is also associated with depression. I have some serious musculoskeletal problems from football that put me into the pain clinic setting, and daily doses of narcotics allowed me to perk along until the doo-doo hit the fan. I take Paxil every day, and look at it the same way I do the insulin I have to take every day. I know that if I can't afford the Paxil, after a week or so it's like the weight of the world descends all around me. I've had about a hundred therapy sessions in two hospitalizations, and would not be as well as I am now without the meds AND the therapy. I am an ex-medical professional, so I knew how to ask the right questions and pester my therapists and Psychiarist till I got to the bottom of things. Thank you so much for this thread...this is a complex disease, and lay people have little background to understand all the crevices. Those who suffer from either situational or chronic clinical depression have my heartfelt understanding and empathy. The others are idiots. Oh, about herbal stuff, that works too, but if you're going to have any kind of surgery you need to get off of it for a couple of weeks before, as it can cause problems with anesthesia. Tell your surgeon and anesthesiologist about any herbal stuff you take. Thank you



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:02 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


now im depressed,



Enlargement of the thalamus provides an anatomical basis for why people who inherit two SERT-ss alleles are more vulnerable to major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and suicide.


paper


edit on 7-11-2010 by zerbot565 because: link fix



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by zerbot565
hmm lets see ,
fear triggers hormones from the small part in the back center of brain thalamus that over rides you and you do thing s automaticly ,

constant fear mongering keeps hormone factory in over drive resulting in "mild brain damage" ^^cough cough^^^
depression ,

outside stimulus makes you sad in the long run , mmkay



exactly what I have learned it the stressful situational eventually triggers the anxiety and that triggers the chemically depression, fight or flight syndrome triggers, it triggers that area of the brain and you can't correct it.



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:05 PM
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Originally posted by zerbot565
reply to post by Hefficide
 


now im depressed,



Enlargement of the thalamus provides an anatomical basis for why people who inherit two SERT-ss alleles are more vulnerable to major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and suicide.


paper


edit on 7-11-2010 by zerbot565 because: link fix


I would agree with that, that is why it seems to be hereditary too.
edit on 023030p://bSunday2010 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:06 PM
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Tell it brouther! Well said. i too was a lil triped out and sickend by the calliousness and ignorance i was reading from that other thred



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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It's amazing how many people are suffering from depression. I have been on anti depressants for over two years now and if it were not for the fact that I have an excellent doctor I would not be where I am today. Anyone who thinks depression is not a real illness are obviously not familiar with what depression is and what the symptoms are. Thankfully with the right medication life can go on ticking over nicely. I sincerely wish anyone who suffers from this all the best for the future.


Peace,


Sequentis



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by zerbot565
 


From your link,


The elevated number of pulvinar neurons in subjects with a SERT-ss genotype may serve to enhance subcortical input of emotionally relevant stimuli to the limbic system, providing a mechanism for the 5HTTLPR genetic variant to affect predisposition to conditions such as major depression.


This is theory. And even if it is relevant it only offers a single possible factor of predisposition and not a definitive understanding of the illness or all causes.

~Heff



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:16 PM
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Depression is very real due to observable changes in body chemistry.


Now, things like Anorexia and Bulimia might really be BS.



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:21 PM
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As others have said, it is amazing to see just how many people suffer with this every day. I did not anticipate that this many people on ATS go through the same issues as I do. Then to think of how many times you must multiply this to get an estimate of the worldwide suffering... it's incredible.

If nothing else, I hope this thread has shown at least one person that they aren't alone in their suffering and that there are various methods of treating and curing depression. Although it was not the original intention of the thread, I would be more than pleased to know that it helped someone find some sort of hope.



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


you do understand that seretonin is the thing that makes you happy , even your article sais so , even the one you quoted ,

and you do understand that what ive been probing here is at the protein that moves the seretonine from one network to an other if damaged might be the cause for depression

and that stimulus outside of you pretty much regulate the levels of hormones produced and pre sets how much of em are transported throu the thalamus ?

just seamt a bit wierd that you put seretonin on the table but dismiss the protein that carries it,



posted on Nov, 7 2010 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by zerbot565
 



The neurotransmitters responsible for these amazing feelings are serotonin, dopamine, norepinephine, melatonin, and oxytocin. Amino acids (proteins) responsible for their upkeep are trytophan and tyrosine, and enzymes in general.


Source

Serotonin is part of the picture. But...


To start off with, the serotonin theory of depression actually began as the norepinephrine theory of depression. This idea came from Dr. Schildkraut in 1965, who came up the with theory based on the pharmacotherapies current at the time. Antidepressant drugs were really new stuff then, and the original drugs, the tricyclic antidepressants, inhibited the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine. So the norepinephrine theory wasn't that out there. The serotonin theory followed from Dr. Coppen in 1967, who hypothesized that serotonin, not norepinephrine, was the cause of antidepressant effectiveness. And as more drugs were discovered, he appeared to be right. First came the tricyclics, then the MAOIs, both of which had effects on serotonin. Then came the SSRIs, which had effects on almost nothing BUT serotonin, and were still effective as antidepressants. And yet, they're not THAT effective...

So depression MUST be caused by low levels of serotonin in the brain, right? Wrong! Just because a drug relieves the symptoms of something, does not mean that the lack of that drug was the cause of the symptoms. In the most common example, it's a well known fact that headaches are not caused by a lack of asprin...

So basically, there aren't large numbers of studies out there saying "serotonin theory of depression totally works!", and there are other drugs which work for depression, and yet exclude the serotonin system all together. But Prozac still works in a significant number of patients. So what does this mean? Is the serotonin theory of depression totally wrong? Well, probably not entirely. The brain is a complicated place, and it's most likely that depression is a combination of factors, such as changes in neuronal growth and death, changes in neuronal connections, and changes in the biochemistry of neurotransmitters such as serotonin. Additionally, it is very possible that all of these changes feed back and influence each other. So serotonin may still play a role in depression, but it is probably not the main cause, and in fact there may not be one main cause of depression.


Source

To answer your question directly. No, I do not know that serotonin is what makes me happy.

Depression remains a highly misunderstood illness. We only use the medications that we have for it, today, because of the fact that they were found to tend to alleviate symptoms in some people. Not because a "cause" was discovered and then had medications tailored for it.

~Heff





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