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Unacceptable Facts. Lack of Voting.

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posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 12:16 AM
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We are 3 months away from going to the polls, we have to main candidates
George W. Bush and John Kerry. In the past century less and less Americans have come out to vote, and in the last presidential election in the year 2000 only 51% of americans voted. Here's the link
us.cnn.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink">us.cnn.com...

According to the US Census 2000 there was a total of 205 576 million people from the ages of 18 and over in the US, I imagine that number has gone up now
Heres the link . See BOTH SEXES , SPECIAL AGE CATEGORIES, 18 YEARS AND OVER.eire.census.gov..." target="_blank" class="postlink">eire.census.gov... e2-1.txt

What does this all mean ?? It means that out of 205 million approximately 103 million people voted during the last election. In my opinion this is unnaceptable in a free society. The freedom to elect our own presidents and officials hasn't been around that long, in fact the freedom to elect our own representatives was one of the main reasons for the American Revolution
heres the link.
encarta.msn.com...(History).html#p88" target="_blank" class="postlink">encarta.msn.com... States_(History).html#p88
And even after the independence from Britain not all americans had the right to vote, only white males who owned property could , and women couldn't vote either. heres the link.
www2.edgate.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink">www2.edgate.com...
I believe that voting is one of the most important things we can do to exercise our freedom, and we shouldn't take it for granted. Please share your thoughts about the right to vote regardless of your political viewpoint and say if wether or not you are coming out to vote this coming election.

I'm voting

[edit on 29-6-2004 by bartholomeo]




posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 12:53 AM
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It is my opinion, that if you don't vote..(and you are able to) you have no right to complain about anything in politics.



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 01:07 AM
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See my feeling is that everything will change with this election. I think we will see the biggest voter turnout in a long time. Largely, due to all the action going on in politics and the world. Its been a busy last four years, is that good or bad, let the polls decide!



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 01:52 AM
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I agree. I think the voter turnout, this election, will be huge. There is so much on the line: the war, the economy, constitutional rights. Plus, as stupid as this may sound, I think a lot of younger voters will be influenced by the Michael Moore film and actually vote. Whether this is good or bad, is up to your own political opinions.
I have this strange feeling that we are at one of those historical crossroads and "something" will change. What, will change, I can't say..it's just a overwhelming feeling.
I don't think that Kerry is the greatest thing on earth, but I won't vote for Bush.
Sorry if this is incoherent. Part of me is writing from a political perspective and the other is from just a bit of a psychic feeling.
In the end, I don't have a clue what will happen.
joey



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 01:59 AM
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I also find that in the free world its a sort of "must" to go
to the election box. Its a basic thing that define us as a
democratic socity (spelling?!?). I'm 28 now and every year
i went to the election box.



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 10:58 AM
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51% turnout at the polls is, I believe, an even poorer showing than UK's voting numbers. Compulsory voting is actively enforced in Australia, but I believe that there are stronger arguments against than there are for this system.

I definitely agree that people should take the trouble to vote, but I don't see any quick solution to changing the mindset of those who don't. However, although not a US citizen myself, I will be surprised if there's not a large increase in the numbers voting in November.



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 11:17 AM
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But if all the candidates suck, I'm supposed to go out and vote for the one who sucks less, lol, the current system is such a joke



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 11:25 AM
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You are one of what is popularly referred to as "the disaffected voters". At least I think that's the term. By not voting, you're as good as disenfranchised. Can't you choose between the lesser of the two evils?

I feel for you, but I don't know what the answer is.



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 11:35 AM
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HERE!, maddox.xmission.com... read that. Its out of date but it still has good points.


[edit on 29-6-2004 by MrFace]

[edit on 29-6-2004 by MrFace]



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 11:51 AM
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Here's something about the Election Process I don't understand. I also do not see how it is justified and how it was legalized. It is not the same for every state either exactly, but close. I think so anyway, I may be wrong, and it may be the same in every state after all.

What I'm talking about is that someone who WAS a Convicted Felon is not able to vote. Even if they served their time, are no longer on Parole & have stayed out of trouble since then.

It seems to me that to deny someone their right to vote even after paying their debt to society would be illegal. Does anyone know the Real Facts behind this?? Or am I misinformed all together about this rule??



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 01:24 PM
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"the disaffected voters" are probably why so many people don't vote, On one hand you have the lying, manipulating and greedy bush, and on the other you have kerry, who hasn't stood firm on anything enough for anyone to really get a good sense of what he is going to do. If you want me to vote for something, how about a change to the system, alter it so that the only people running for pres are the ones who can afford it, then maybe you'll see my face at the poles.

BTW, the last time you saw my face in the poles was when they where trying to pass some controversial issues in California that had to do with marijuana and affirmative action, both of which passed at the state level but were shut down because of the gov.

I love this country, I served it in the U.S. Marine Corps, and am very patriotic as far as the things I believe this country stands for, but the sham of a system we have in place now just negates everything this country really stands for



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 02:17 PM
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Last two times I went to vote people left, complaining about the length of the wait in line. I used to live in a place where it was over 2 hours in line by alphabet to get in to vote. Then I moved to a place that was so sparsely populated that we basically walked in, checked stuff off and left. Total transaction time was about 10 minutes. Where I live now was well over an hour to get in. People complain about more than 6 minutes in a drive-thru... they're not gonna take one for the team and stand online for over an hour to vote for someone they don't even like... or even to vote against someone they really hate. It seems convenience has taken its toll. People are too spoiled to wait. Although I saw a lot of seniors who stood there like tree trunks, not willing to go until they'd had their say.



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 02:25 PM
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Originally posted by Plato986
It is my opinion, that if you don't vote..(and you are able to) you have no right to complain about anything in politics.


Amen men to that! If you don't at least make an attempt to make a change, how can you complain about the person in office? This has always stumped me.


Originally posted by torque
People complain about more than 6 minutes in a drive-thru... they're not gonna take one for the team and stand online for over an hour to vote for someone they don't even like... or even to vote against someone they really hate. It seems convenience has taken its toll. People are too spoiled to wait.


I bet these same people would wait two hours in line at an amusement park for a two minute ride though. Oh the irony!



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by bartholomeo
We are 3 months away from going to the polls, we have to main candidates
George W. Bush and John Kerry. In the past century less and less Americans have come out to vote, and in the last presidential election in the year 2000 only 51% of americans voted. Here's the link
us.cnn.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink">us.cnn.com...

That's BS. The voter turnout is more like 20%. It's a hell of a lot lower than 50%.



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 11:42 PM
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FYI--it is up to the individual states to allow a convicted felon to vote. I think that there are about 13 states that still completely prohibit a convicted felon from voting, even after time has been served & probation is over. Most states have enacted legislation allowing ex-cons to vote once probation is finished, but more and more states are starting to allow voting while probation is being completed. I think there are now two or three states that allow convicts to vote while in prison.

It is a widely debated issue--typically with Democrats for allowing ex-cons to vote once their debt to society has been paid and with Republicans on the other side of the argument, especially because the ACLU is heavily involved in pushing to get the laws relaxed (although there have been some notable Republicans who support restoring voting rights to felons, like Arlen Spector, who tried to sponsor such legislation in 2002). There is more info on the ACLU site, Voting Rights, Ex-Offenders:

www.aclu.org...



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 11:55 PM
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Originally posted by Plato986
It is my opinion, that if you don't vote..(and you are able to) you have no right to complain about anything in politics.


to add to that...if you dont vote...i'd probably rather you not vote...



posted on Jun, 29 2004 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by mOjOm


What I'm talking about is that someone who WAS a Convicted Felon is not able to vote. Even if they served their time, are no longer on Parole & have stayed out of trouble since then.



I agree with you there....If someone was...he/she should be allowed to vote once they are free and clear of everything....its seems like they are continuely punished for it...



posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 12:02 AM
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Originally posted by nyarlathotep




Originally posted by torque
People complain about more than 6 minutes in a drive-thru... they're not gonna take one for the team and stand online for over an hour to vote for someone they don't even like... or even to vote against someone they really hate. It seems convenience has taken its toll. People are too spoiled to wait.


I bet these same people would wait two hours in line at an amusement park for a two minute ride though. Oh the irony!


Don't be so sure of that. There is absolutely NO WAY that I would be able to stand for 2 hours in line, due to physical disability. And I hope that the queues are formed indoors. OK, I'm not a US citizen, but if I were, waiting times like these would certainly not be conducive to my going to vote.



posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 12:06 AM
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In many countries in the civilized world where it is possible for citizens to exercise democratic rights, voting is mandatory - there is a penalty or fine levied and enforced on constituents who do not vote - meaning that voting is seen as a civic duty.

Why is the USA so far behind the developed world on this issue of voter turnout - is it an insidious part of the dumbing down process - ensuring that people are apathetic and feel that they make no difference as one individual - maintaining the established corrupt order/status quo - all under a mythological set of constitutional liberties and freedoms?



posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 12:39 AM
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Australia is one country where compulsory voting is strictly enforced. You really get hounded by the Electoral Commission's staff [I think it's their staff, could be wrong, but you get hounded anyway]. Fines are levied & are increased for further offences. The usual fine was around $AU50, but one guy was fined in excess of $400.

I'm undecided about the merits or otherwise of compulsory voting. One issue that its detractors bring up is infringement on civil liberties & personal choice. And there seem to be a lot more poinys argued against it than in favour. I guess I haven't really thought about this, because voting is compulsory here.



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