Poppy Day.. Why Wouldnt you Wear One? Nov 11th

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posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 04:54 PM
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Originally posted by woodwardjnr
Personally I always buy a poppy and wear it for a few days. However, I believe people have the right not to wear it, thats what defeating fascism was about. I like the idea of the white poppy too. a poppy for peace, but still respectful. www.whitepoppy.org.uk... Remembering ALL those who are killed in wars not just the soldiers.
edit on 4-11-2010 by woodwardjnr because: (no reason given)
edit on 4-11-2010 by woodwardjnr because: (no reason given)


A white poppy of peace is what we fought for..


War is for mugs.. But be glad that there are those who would die for you to wear stockings and suspenders that day if you wish.. Thats peace lol




posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 04:55 PM
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I tend to loose my poppies throughout the day



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 04:57 PM
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I have mine on, and it will remain until after the service's next week. My great grandfather fought in WWI and my grandfather in WWII (taken POW), both thankfully survived, but I will gladly wear it to remember those who died for our freedom.

I will also wear it to remember my friend Danny Wilson who was killed in Basra, 2007.



Kingsman Wilson, aged 28, of the 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, died as a result of injuries sustained during a patrol in Basra City on 1 April 2007. Kingsman Wilson was conducting a security patrol close to Basra Palace when his patrol came under fire. He had dismounted from his Warrior vehicle to check the roadside ahead for explosive devices when he was hit by small arms fire. Despite being given immediate first aid at the scene, tragically he died of his injuries.

Kingsman Danny John Wilson

From Workington and a proud Cumbrian, Kingsman Danny John Wilson was born on 5 August 1978. He first joined the Lancastrian and Cumbrian Volunteers (TA) and then in July 2005, the 1st Battalion, The Kings Own Royal Border Regiment. He served with his Battalion in Iraq in 2006 and then volunteered to deploy once again with the 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, where he joined CHINDIT Company in early March this year.


Kingsman Danny John Wilson
edit on 4/11/10 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 04:57 PM
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Originally posted by InnerTruths
I tend to loose my poppies throughout the day


Yeah they tend to fall off.
I remember when they had a green center. That said, it's more about the thought than it is anything else.



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by Yissachar1
 


My grand father and his father were both veterans. WW1 and 2 respectively.

I wear them every year and donate heavily to the Veteran programs in my area.

November 11th has NOTHING to do with honoring war, it's honoring our fallen heroes and veteran heroes who were sent into the most gruesome and ridiculous situations and fought for the rights we have today.

~Keeper



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


Another to add to my increasing list of brothers


Please pass on my best to his folks, and tell them we are proud of him, and we will never forget him..



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:05 PM
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As a former serviceman, I make a donation to the Poppy Appeal every year, but I don't wear a poppy. This is mainly due to being forced to wear one in the corporate environments I've worked in over the last 13 years or so and it went from being an important symbol to being a real pain in the ass that catches on everything. Sadly, this kind of poppy fascism detracts from the whole message behind the appeal.

I still watch/attend the parade here in London though.

Rev



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:06 PM
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2 videos. If you can get through both without tears, you may, I said "may", not have a heart for those that served. This is a true story from my home province:



Why do they do it?




posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:08 PM
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I am reminded of the poppy and it's association with casualties of war 3 times daily.... That is how many times I take morphine for that is supplied to me by the Veterans Administration for chronic pain from combat related injuries.... I am sure that if I go to Wal-Mart on Armistice Day, There will be members of veterans organizations selling poppies at the entrance and exit doors or in the parking lot... Most people have no idea about why the poppy is significant.



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by woogleuk
I have mine on, and it will remain until after the service's next week. My great grandfather fought in WWI and my grandfather in WWII (taken POW), both thankfully survived, but I will gladly wear it to remember those who died for our freedom.

I will also wear it to remember my friend Danny Wilson who was killed in Basra, 2007.



Kingsman Wilson, aged 28, of the 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, died as a result of injuries sustained during a patrol in Basra City on 1 April 2007. Kingsman Wilson was conducting a security patrol close to Basra Palace when his patrol came under fire. He had dismounted from his Warrior vehicle to check the roadside ahead for explosive devices when he was hit by small arms fire. Despite being given immediate first aid at the scene, tragically he died of his injuries.

Kingsman Danny John Wilson

From Workington and a proud Cumbrian, Kingsman Danny John Wilson was born on 5 August 1978. He first joined the Lancastrian and Cumbrian Volunteers (TA) and then in July 2005, the 1st Battalion, The Kings Own Royal Border Regiment. He served with his Battalion in Iraq in 2006 and then volunteered to deploy once again with the 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, where he joined CHINDIT Company in early March this year.


Kingsman Danny John Wilson
edit on 4/11/10 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)


You honor his memory by speaking of him
Alot of Americans forget our Brit brothers in arms on Veterans day, and men of other countries we fight alongside. I do not I'm eternally gratefull for them as well.
edit on 4-11-2010 by rakkasansct because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by Yissachar1
 


Thanks Yissachar1, I will pass your message along to Ste (his brother) next time we all get together.

There are a lot of families out there who have to deal with pain of loved ones who are not coming home, I just hope in the long run, it was worth it (that their sacrifice helped bring peace).



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid
2 videos. If you can get through both without tears, you may, I said "may", not have a heart for those that served. This is a true story from my home province:



Why do they do it?



It hurts me that some folks would begruge two minuets to remember those brave men and women who gave them those two minuets to begin with :_



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by rakkasansct
 


Thanks rakkasansct, whilst I miss Danny, the times we shared at school, growing up, the pub (lol) and other shenanigans we all got up to, it was your posting of a friend on the previous page that inspired me to put him up on here, t'was a nice thought.
edit on 4/11/10 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by hypervigilant
 

You break my heart bro... Its like they just want to brush us all under the carpet and forget us when our usefullness is spent.. The poppy wont let them forget though.. They should bare your wounds too.. They sent you there!.. What is it with americans disowning their vets? Look what happened after Vietnam..

I cant do much for you mate. But i will pray for you. And send a donation to the American legion..



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:35 PM
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reply to post by Yissachar1
 


Times have changed here since Vietnam. At my VFW post there is alot of Vietnam vets, and they do there best so that what happened to them, never happens again. When I came home from Iraq in uniform, I could barely walk 2 feet without someone thanking me, or talking to me. It was very overwhelming, coming from an enviroment where crowds=danger. To where a crowd gathers to share there love, and thanks to you.
Great now your making my heart hurt ,Yissachar1. I'll share a brew with you over the web



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:39 PM
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FTR I didn't serve. My great grandfather fought in WW1, for the Germans. His son, the man that raised me fought in WW2. He went over in '38. Yup '38. He went into the British army before Canada entered the war. He had to transfer later and he retired from working out of the army. My father was navy. I tried to sign up during Desert Storm but was found lacking. A bad liver. Right. My liver was better than my fathers then. I also happened to be almost 30. The pricks, yes, pricks, didn't let me serve. I know this sounds odd to some but service to ones country is paramount to some people. Even in bad times.



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:53 PM
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reply to post by rakkasansct
 


Way ahead of you lol

Got work early in the morning too, plus getting the "stare" off the missus.. lol.. Oh well.. I have my boots bulled and medals polished for the 11th.. Im also going to lay a poppy wreath for my American brothers who died in Vietnam..



posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


I beg to differ.. You DID serve! You served right alongside your family, with them.. And now you pass their legacy on..

Mission accomplished
edit on 4-11-2010 by Yissachar1 because: (no reason given)


CX

posted on Nov, 4 2010 @ 06:45 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid
I buy a poppy every year at this time BUT I wear a poppy pin like this 365 days a year. That said I'm from a military family.


I have exactly the same one pinned to my backpack which i wear 365 days a year, the pin is stuck tight with epoxy so its never coming off.


Some people have asked why i wear it when its not Remeberance Day, i just smile and say "Some people remember for more than just one day a year".

I do buy poppies as well, and i agree that it doesn't take too much out of your day to do the same, however i won't preach to people if they don't. I have known many people who find it difficult to wear them. They have enough memories in their head already, they don't need somethig pinned to them to prove they are thankfull for what our services have done in the past.

I appreciate that there are many that are unhappy with recent conflicts, but when i walk down the highstreet and see guys who saw action in the World Wars, usualy in wheelchairs with rows of medals you can't help being humbled by....i challenge anyone to walk past and not want to at least say thanks.

CX.



posted on Nov, 5 2010 @ 12:54 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 





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