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Is it possible that the Deepwater Horizon incident has caused an unusual drought around the Gulf?

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posted on Oct, 26 2010 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by Nogard2012
reply to post by justadood
 


look at archive month year on that site
It shows that the Gulf coast had in 2009...


i'm on the site, but i am unable to locate the feature you are referring to.

can you help?




posted on Oct, 26 2010 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by Nogard2012
reply to post by justadood
 


What i am saying is that the area around the gulf is supposed to have had above average precipitation during the summer from the La Nina but the area got below average rainfall instead and during the winter the weather is expected to be drier than normal because of not only the La Nina as mentioned but also whatever has caused the summer to be unusually dry in that area.
I forgot to mention this on my previous post that all areas are expected to have at least some relief except for central Florida where it hasn't rained for 26 days currently and this could be the first time such a large area of Florida hasn't had rain for an entire calender month in recorded history.
AHPs precipitation analysis


La Nina is supposed to make the gulf region warmer and drier, not wetter. So one could attribute the regional drought to la nina, right?

www.reuters.com...

www.sciencedaily.com...

www.newton.dep.anl.gov...
edit on 26-10-2010 by justadood because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2010 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by justadood
 


That's during the winter as all ready stated
www.noaanews.noaa.gov...
look at top of precipitation map it says "Winter"
Also here
www.elnino.noaa.gov...
It says
"Drier than normal conditions also typically occur in the Central Plains in the fall and in the Southeast in the winter"
edit on 10/27/2010 by Nogard2012 because: more support of drier conditions during winter

Here it shows wetter and cooler weather than normal during summer La Nina.
www.srh.noaa.gov...
edit on 10/27/2010 by Nogard2012 because: summer conditions



posted on Oct, 27 2010 @ 03:18 PM
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2008
June. 3 inches above normal to 5 inch below normal
July. normal to 6 inches below normal with 3 inches above in parts of Florida
August. 4 inches to a FOOT above normal from Fay
September. 6 inch above normal for Mississippi valley 4 inches below normal for rest and 6 inches below in Florida Florida.
October. Three inches below normal in Mississippi valley with 1 inch above in rest of Gulf.

water.weather.gov...
look just below map it says timeframe
make archive:month/year highlighted
and select month and year from scroll menu below that.



posted on Nov, 16 2010 @ 05:35 AM
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www.weather.gov...
Here in the Florida peninsula entire lakes are actually disappearing.
The vegetation is dying everywhere.
Many areas have only had rain once since September ended.
Yet this nor the fact that hydrates are still erupting from the sea floor are nowhere in the media which is terribly



posted on Nov, 16 2010 @ 05:44 AM
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Well here is some out of the box thoughts.. (Not bothered by knowledge)

Besides storms coming from see as normal could it also be that:

1. The hole in the ground where the crude oil has leaked out , it could be filled with fresh water instead of seawater.

Not sure how to say it.. the oil escaped from the well needs to be replaced by something.. What if fresh water trough underground rivers has flown in, lowering the groundwater level in nearing landmass.

This will also result in less evaporating of moist on the landmasses, witch means less rain somewhere.



2. The other thing could be that the oil layer on the seawater prevents the seawater from evaporating and therefore there is not enough water in the air to form rain-clouds.
2A. As the oil layer would function as an isolater as well, the temperature difference between air and water normally will influence storms as well, due to the oil layer this difference will be less as well.


3. Last but not least: A weather program that creates drought to financially bankrupt the small farmers so large corporations and government can buy them out for a low price.

edit on 16-11-2010 by EarthOccupant because:

edit on 16-11-2010 by EarthOccupant because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2010 @ 06:25 AM
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reply to post by EarthOccupant
 


Or maybe the oils composition and being so far under the ocean surface from corexit has caused it to act like an ocean coolant and cooling the Gulf.

Or maybe all the toxic corexit has prevented evaporation.

Eitther way the effect's from this would obviously include the Florida peninsula getting a drought since winds over the Gulf tend to go from west to east causing an almost Sahara-like airmass over the peninsula and making winter cold fronts simply making it worse without any rain.
edit on 11/16/2010 by Nogard2012 because: obvious result



posted on Nov, 22 2010 @ 01:31 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Dec, 4 2010 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by Nogard2012
 


www.weather.gov...
Checkout the low temperatures and humidity forecast for monday and tuesday night
Teens and twenties expected for much of the south with thirties all the way down to the Everglades.
The humidity on Monday afternoon and Tuesday afternoon in the southeast is expected in many areas at only around 25% similar to the desert southwest on those times.



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 12:35 AM
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Originally posted by Nogard2012
reply to post by Nogard2012
 


www.weather.gov...
Checkout the low temperatures and humidity forecast for monday and tuesday night
Teens and twenties expected for much of the south with thirties all the way down to the Everglades.
The humidity on Monday afternoon and Tuesday afternoon in the southeast is expected in many areas at only around 25% similar to the desert southwest on those times.

Temps are expected to to go down to the teens to the Florida panhandle next Monday that is over 20F below normal. Is there any other way to explain this other than the oil cooling the Gulf theory?
edit on 12/9/2010 by Nogard2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2010 @ 07:25 PM
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the BP incident is a big disaster for the Gulf Mexico
but i don't think that it can affect the rainfall it just polluted the sea not the air



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:27 PM
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www.cfnews13.com...
www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov...
No rain is expected for next week either.
Ever since the BP incident started, drought has been worsening in Florida.
edit on 3/16/2011 by Nogard2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by Nogard2012
www.cfnews13.com...
www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov...
No rain is expected for next week either.
Ever since the BP incident started, drought has been worsening in Florida.
edit on 3/16/2011 by Nogard2012 because: (no reason given)


Yes, I'm sure that this drought, which precedes the BP spill by at least 6 months, and is occurring in a state over-run with luxury golf courses and pristine, green lawns in a state that was once essentially salt water marshes and swamp land is entirely due to the BP gusher.

I'm sure that's what all those developers would like you to believe, as well. Probably has NOTHING to do with Floridians tapping those ancient aquifers for fountains and un-natural, god-awful, useless lawns.

www.cbsnews.com...



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 06:59 AM
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reply to post by incrediblelousminds
 


An article from FOUR YEARS ago
In MAY, which is at the end of the dry season where its normally dry. And that drought was almost erased during a normal wet season that started soon after that was published.
Also there was actually an unusually rainy February and March last year.
Meanwhile the current drought has been going on since SEPTEMBER because of an unusually dry summer storm season.
Afterwards there was:
not a SINGLE drop of rain in October,
a somewhat drier than normal November.
Only once did it rain in December when fronts brought nothing but cold air in the 20s thrice.
January was somewhat helpful. but bought freeze kills on the vegetation as well.
February was unusually warm and hardly any precipitation.
March had some rain in the first couple days nothing since and it will end with nothing more
April is usually even drier than March.
May is usually the driest month.
June is when the downpours are supposed to start and end it.
edit on 3/19/2011 by Nogard2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by Nogard2012
 


I am aware of the date of the article. I posted it. My point is that Florida has a history of droughts (hence, the article), and I see you providing ZERO evidence to explain HOW the BP spill is causing a drought in Florida. Just guesses. Also, why just Florida? Many other parts of the South have had record rainfall since the spill. Doesn't that challenge your claim? Are you aware that being challenged is part of the scientific process? Guys don't just sit in rooms and think up wild theories and then agree with each other. THINK, man.

Florida is over-developed, and has tapped their aquifers for years. You dont think this would cause a drought? I'm just pushing you to think critically but you seem intent on believing your own opinion, regardless. So be it. Just trying to get you to think about the many factors that likely contribute to a drought.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:29 PM
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How would a lower water table UNDERGROUND have any noticeable effect on the rainfall when the rainfall falling from above comes ALMOST ENTIRELY from evaporation from the Atlantic and the Gulf which surround three out of four sides of the state.
Florida leads the nation in reclaimed water usage.
www.dep.state.fl.us...
Some nuclear power plants in the state use plain ocean water for some of their cooling operations.
www.fpl.com...

And what I have been saying is that a oil/corexit mixture MIGHT be affecting evaporation from the Gulf as the corexit breaks down and the oil surfaces thus explaining the many surface oil patches over the last few months. As oil is hydrophobic it can slow evaporation by blocking the waters evaporation route until the oil itself is evaporated.
van.physics.illinois.edu...



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by Nogard2012
 


Fair point in reference to aquifers direct effect. But paving,deforestation and development do indeed have a direct correlation on rainfall levels, as they destroy some of the key ingredients in formulating/crystallizing rainfall, regardless of where the precipitation in the clouds originates. Why would Florida be experiencing a drought when surrounding Southern locales have had ample rainfall originating from the Gulf?

Furthermore, while Florida's pan-handle receives rainfall originating in the Gulf, the Southern part of the state also experiences systems from the Atlantic. The Northern and South-eastern part of the state can receive up to
100 inches a year, but parts inland and on the South-western coast can receive less than 40.

Can you show me numbers comparing the annual rainfall between all the Gulf Coast states over the past three years? This seems like basic information for your thesis I would hope you would have collected to present your case.


Here's a few basic links I've looked at while composing this information:

goflorida.about.com...

coolweather.net...

www.currentresults.com...

I found this one particular informative as far as a deeper understanding of weather patterns in the region:

www.aoml.noaa.gov...

I think you have a valid thesis, but you seem to be basing it on a lot of guess work. Take some time to build a better case. If you are as concerned as you seem to be, a good few days of research seems reasonable.



posted on Jul, 11 2011 @ 06:45 PM
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www.ncdc.noaa.gov...

edit on 7/11/2011 by Nogard2012 because: image



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