How do you properly store dry foods?

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posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 09:48 PM
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I'm not a hardcore survivalist, but have started storing a small food supply in the basement, among other things I figured it would be good to have some dry bulk foods like rice and beans. I also thought they would keep pretty much forever if stored in a cool, dry place. So I put some clear plastic bags of beans and rice (basically the bags you get when you fill up on bulk foods at the store) in a galvanized metal bucket... thought they'd last for a long time there.

Last week I wanted to add some stuff, though, and found that my first batch that I had put in the bucket about a year ago (rice and beans) had gone bad. Smelled really stale and kind of musty, and it was obvious that it needed to be thrown out.

Now I don't know what to do. For now I keep the new stuff in plastic bags in the bucket, simply because I don't know what else to do. But I need an alternative storage solution, and hope there are some pros here that can give me some good advice.

What did I do wrong? Do I need to store the bulk foods in cotton/burlap sacks instead of plastic? And/or shouldn't I put them into the galvanized bucket? But if I don't, mice might get the stuff. One friend of mine suggested to oven-dry some big mason jars, like you use for canning, and fill them with rice and beans. Is that going to work?
edit on 13-10-2010 by sylvie because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 09:52 PM
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The best way is to go to Lowes or Home Depot and buy some of those 5 gallon buckets with lids. Put your dry goods in these. You can put a couple handfuls of saw dust in the bottom of the buckets to wick out any extra moisture. Not too difficult, and fairly cheap.



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 09:57 PM
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Dried rice and beans will absorb moisture.

I would probably purchase one of those vacuum pack machine's and put them in the bags they also sale and evacuate all the air out of them.

A dehydrator would be a smart purchase.

Dehydrated meat and fruits will easily reconstitute with a little water.

I would not store them in a galvanized can either unless they are in plastic containers first.

I have very little knowledge of this and have no plans to prepare at all.



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


Buckets from Lowes and mylar bags from ebay. I wrote a thread on this last year.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Oct, 14 2010 @ 07:17 AM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


I just watched some youtube videos about this very subject the other day.





Here are two more showing the results of long term food storage.





And for those who have troubles with You Tube vids here are text links.

How to Store Long Term Food Storage

Home Food Storage: 5 gallon buckets as Dry Food Storage



posted on Oct, 14 2010 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by SeenMyShare
 


Excellent info, thanks so much (and thanks to the OP for such a great question!).



posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 09:21 PM
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posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 09:33 PM
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For me ,the best way is to put them in plastic bags ,then in a cupboard .



posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by Mactire
The best way is to go to Lowes or Home Depot and buy some of those 5 gallon buckets with lids. Put your dry goods in these. You can put a couple handfuls of saw dust in the bottom of the buckets to wick out any extra moisture. Not too difficult, and fairly cheap.


EXACTLY



posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 09:39 PM
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for storing eggs, you can dip them in a water and sodium silicate(waterglass)dip, then store them in a cool dark place. they should stay fresh for a year.

secure.sciencecompany.com...
edit on 15-10-2010 by aliengenes because: add



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


for rice and any wheat product,you HAVE to put it in the freezer for 24 hours or more.it kills the tiny livestock eggs



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 02:49 PM
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Since the videos aren't working anymore...

Put the dried foods in a mylar storage bag, along with an oxygen absorber, then seal this in a 6 gallon food grade bucket, with a gamma seal lid (easier to open than common bung lids). The following links are just examples, but their prices aren't bad.

6 Gallon food grade bucket:

beprepared.com...

Mylar storage bag:

beprepared.com...

Gamma Seal lid:

beprepared.com...

Oxygen absorbers:

beprepared.com...



posted on Apr, 29 2013 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


after freezing your rice,or even flour,use a 2 liter soda bottle for long term storage.Keeping it dry is the key.





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