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The Thousand by Kevin Guilfoile

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posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 07:59 AM
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So, I'm reading this book, which is great, and in the book, a group of guys are flying to Chicago and one of them mentions the "single most authoritative daytime sighting in history."

The speaker then goes on to mention November 7, 2006, 4:30 PM and the dozen plus airport workers (maintenance crews, ramp workers and pilots) who all observed a metallic disk hovering over gate C and how, after a few minutes, the disk accelrated upward, punching a hole in the clouds.

The character then adds that a pilot allegedly took a digital photo which has been suppresed by the airline.

I'm unsure if the photo he is talking about actually exists and I've emailed the author about it as we have the only known photo of the ufo available here on ATS.

The book, by the way, is great. It's complicated to describe but it's about a secretive group who control the everything using theories and secrets passed down from generation to generation, all based on the work of Pythagoras.

some reviews of the book can be found here:
castofshadows.net...

Ohare photo and discussion:
www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 09:22 AM
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Originally posted by Crakeur

All based on the work of Pythagoras.



Very interesting.

Since last month, I've been looking for a new book...-
will be taking a look at this one.



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 09:25 AM
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reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


It's great, so far.

Another book to read is The Passage by Justin Cronin. This is the first in a planned trilogy about a military experiment gone very, very wrong. Starts off in modern times, setting the stage for the experiments that result in a virus released on the public, turning the majority of the population into Vampire type creatures. The story jumps ahead to a future where the remaining humans are running out of power for the generators that keep the lights on at night (keeping the vampires at bay).



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 09:32 AM
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reply to post by Crakeur
 


I appreciate the heads-up! I'm always on the hunt for a good read. I'll definitely seek this one out!



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 09:37 AM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


If ever you run dry on reading material, u2u me. I burn thru books quickly and there's always at least 3 in the queue on the nook.

this one is right up ATS' collective alley.



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 09:39 AM
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Originally posted by Crakeur
reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


It's great, so far.

Another book to read is The Passage by Justin Cronin. This is the first in a planned trilogy about a military experiment gone very, very wrong. Starts off in modern times, setting the stage for the experiments that result in a virus released on the public, turning the majority of the population into Vampire type creatures. The story jumps ahead to a future where the remaining humans are running out of power for the generators that keep the lights on at night (keeping the vampires at bay).


Oh this one sounds fun!

I'm adding both to the list. ;D



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


the only problem I had with The Passage was that I read it when it first came out and tore thru it too fast. Now I have to wait a long time for book two. When The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo came out I didn't read it until the third book came out. This way I was able to read the three back to back (to back). They're very good as well, although the three books are all different in that one is a thriller, one is more courtroom drama and one is a bit more "Actiony"

Some more good ones:
Bad Things Happen - Harry Doyle. Guy gets a job working as an editor for a crime/pulp magazine and winds up in a relationship with the owner's wife and then the murders start. Funny, twisting story

Ordinary Thunderstorms - William Boyd. Weather scientist goes to apply for a job, winds up being the prime suspect in a murder and finds himself on the run. This one is all the more fun because the guy is an ordinary guy who has no clue what he's doing or why he decides to go on the run.

Charlie Huston is one author who has never written a bad thing. His Joe Pitt series is incredible (vampires in NYC), as is the Henry Thompson series. Both sets are short, pulpy stories. For longer reads, The Shotgun Rule if excellent and The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death is hysterical and is currently being prepped for HBO.

World War Z - Max Brooks. His Zombie Survival Guide was funny as hell but WWZ is a masterpiece. It's an oral history of world war III, zombies vs. humans. It's written like a documentary, different parts of the story, the start, the spread, the war, the aftermath etc are all done in the form or speeches and interviews. It's chilling and frightening in some areas (I read it while in Jamaica and sitting on the porch, late at night, when the only awake creatures were the dogs roaming the property, and every crack of a branch had me jumping) and hysterical throughout. Brooks skewers our military and our warring ways (his shock and awe section is a riot - full technological force used against mindless zombies, not so shocking, not so awe inspiring). Brooks is Mel Brooks' son so the humor throughout is a given.

Ship of Gold In The Deep Blue Sea - Gary Kinder - Nonfiction. Tells the story of the sinking of a ship heading back from California, laden with gold (gold rush era sinking) as well as the story of the men who found the ship. The dual stories are both amazing and the guy who found the ship created most of the technology used to locate deep sea wrecks.



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 10:41 AM
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I sent Mr Guilfoile an email this morning, thanking him for the book and letting him know that the mention of the O'Hare sighting was a nice little jolt this morning and he responded shortly after, thanking me for the additional insight into the sighting. Now I'll be following his twitter account as he plans on tweeting about it.

twitter.com...

he linked back to us. Hell of a guy

edit on 23-9-2010 by Crakeur because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 02:10 PM
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Originally posted by Crakeur
reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


the only problem I had with The Passage was that I read it when it first came out and tore thru it too fast. Now I have to wait a long time for book two. When The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo came out I didn't read it until the third book came out. This way I was able to read the three back to back (to back). They're very good as well, although the three books are all different in that one is a thriller, one is more courtroom drama and one is a bit more "Actiony"



Hahah...- oh that sucks.

I'm kind of impatient...- hmm, very actually
- ... so, I'll better wait for book 2 before starting with that one.

The only trilogy I've read so far is The Lord of the Rings- and I devoured them quickly. - Of course I was lucky they were all availabe (it was way BEFORE the movies came out-) pffft..
But yeah, waiting is not my forte.

Anyway- I really like the one you described on the Original post.
I'll definitely be looking for that one in the upcoming days.


I like the rest of the recommendations as well!- thank you very much.
I see you are more of an avid reader than myself.

I'm guilty these last 2 years of putting this hobbie in a pause. But I've been looking for a book to catch my eye- and now, seems I've found it. Thanks. I'll come back when I buy the book, read and digest it- to say whether it was worth my time or not
lol-
no seriously. I'll come back. =)



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


I picked up Kevin's first book, Cast of Shadows, after emailing back and forth with him this morning. It sounds pretty odd, and cool. A scientist's daughter is raped and killed and the scientist gets his hand on some dna samples and clones the killer. It jumped ahead of the other books sitting on the nook so I'll post my thoughts on it after I finish it up.

As to my being an avid reader, I try to be. My work load cuts into the reading time dramatically but I manage to get a few chapters in a night, before drifting off to the land of the dead tired.



posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 05:43 AM
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Originally posted by Crakeur
reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


I picked up Kevin's first book, Cast of Shadows, after emailing back and forth with him this morning. It sounds pretty odd, and cool. A scientist's daughter is raped and killed and the scientist gets his hand on some dna samples and clones the killer. It jumped ahead of the other books sitting on the nook so I'll post my thoughts on it after I finish it up.


'Cast of Shadows'- source says: "a captivating philosophical thriller"-
Oh yes, my kind of book...


I'm 100% sure that one is in my country.. now the other..("The Thousand")- has not arrived yet.
pft!
But I'll order it anyway, because my interest has been picked.. so I really want to read it first than any other book in my 'future reading list'. hah..
Pythagoras always must come first


Anyway, would love to hear what you have to say about Cast of Shadows.



As to my being an avid reader, I try to be. My work load cuts into the reading time dramatically but I manage to get a few chapters in a night, before drifting off to the land of the dead tired.


Hahah... I should do that too.
I sometimes did- but it has not been working for me, due to different reasons.
Anyway. There should always be time for books!- excuses do not work.; Truth is, there are a few things more fullfiling- than reading a real good book. hah.


edit on 24/9/10 by plutoxgirl because: sp



posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


They don't delve too deep into the actual concept of numbers and pythagoran theory but his teachings are the basis for The Thousand. I don't want you reading the book and getting all jacked up about the lack of math or something.



posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by Crakeur
 


LOL!!

Well, you've just destroyed my illusion. =(
...

I still want it though.
Yes, despite the lack of explicit mathematical material.

It seems a worthy reading




posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


I didn't want to come back here in a few months and see some crazy rant about the lack of mathematical formulae and the basis of the story was destroyed as a result of their being no a squared b squared etc.



posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by Crakeur
 


Crakeur, relax.

I promise I won't whine - (however, I'll write on my private diary- how much I hate you for crashing before hand- my dreams on an elaborated mathematical thriller)
hahah....

And a couple of months you say?- I think it will not last long to arrive here..; so as soon as I get my hands on it- I will come with feedback.
(scared?) :O

And -in a serious tone now- I'm sure, I'll like it.
I can see by your other book recommendations we share the same taste in literature, so it will be alright. =)



posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


I was teasing, of course.

there's very little I won't read but my taste in material is somewhat narrowed by my childish rule of not reading books about men, written by women or books written, primarily, about women, unless they are a genre where my inability to relate to the character won't ruin the book for me.

in the first part, I've found the women don't write what men think very well, they write what they want men to think or what they think they are thinking (men do the same with regards to women)

in the second part, books, movies etc are always more enjoyable if you can relate to the main character in some way and I find it hard to find that connection in books where the men are only minor, ancillary characters.



posted on Sep, 25 2010 @ 12:02 PM
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Originally posted by Crakeur
reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


I was teasing, of course.


Of course, I know.
I was too. ;D

I was tempted to say, 'never take my words too seriously'. Most times, I'm joking.

But no, that could be used against any serious post/thread I've made (or will make in the future). lmao



there's very little I won't read but my taste in material is somewhat narrowed by my childish rule of not reading books about men, written by women or books written, primarily, about women, unless they are a genre where my inability to relate to the character won't ruin the book for me.

in the first part, I've found the women don't write what men think very well, they write what they want men to think or what they think they are thinking (men do the same with regards to women)


Oh, definitely a childish rule- …. And kind of sexist- should I say?..Haha.
(No no. Don’t really want to get in that never-ending debate- zzz). =p

But if you think women don’t write what men really think- but what they think men think- or what they would like men to think- It would be not a bad idea to read from time to time those books- and have a different perspective-?
In certain situations imagine- hm- if my life is a book- and I’m the main character, and god is a woman (the writer that gave you life)- so then, what should I do here- (and channel the inspiration of the feminine literature into you) – Uh? sounds like a good idea.

Anyway,

My fav writers are all men. ;D go figure.




in the second part, books, movies etc are always more enjoyable if you can relate to the main character in some way and I find it hard to find that connection in books where the men are only minor, ancillary characters.



Oh, I can still totally enjoy book/movies/plays, etc. I do not identify with the characters entierly. Of course, you always make some kind of connection with them (feel sympathy, relate to certain actions-attitudes, etc). But I don’t really think it’s a necessary rule to enjoy a book (etc).

I'm good with detachment



posted on Sep, 25 2010 @ 12:06 PM
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Originally posted by plutoxgirl
Oh, definitely a childish rule- …. And kind of sexist- should I say?..Haha.
(No no. Don’t really want to get in that never-ending debate- zzz). =p


Very much so, but I'm aware of it and I admit to my childish and somewhat sexist ways. It's a stupid rule but I have a hard time getting past it.


Originally posted by plutoxgirl

But if you think women don’t write what men really think- but what they think men think- or what they would like men to think- It would be not a bad idea to read from time to time those books- and have a different perspective-?
In certain situations imagine- hm- if my life is a book- and I’m the main character, and god is a woman (the writer that gave you life)- so then, what should I do here- (and channel the inspiration of the feminine literature into you) – Uh? sounds like a good idea.


I agree that I should read more of these things but I have a hard time doing it. I have a hard to accepting that some dude is speaking as a woman would, or vice versa. I think about how I'd react to a situation, how every guy I know would react to that situation and then I read how a woman thinks a man might react and, well, it never seems to fit. On the flip side, I'm not a woman so I'm stuck assuming women would react the way they do in books written by men. This, of course, is an issue all men have and it is highlighted by our belief that, in the event of a fight between two women, eventually, they will tear each other's clothes off and then kiss.

(I'm kidding but I do believe Jerry, George and Kramer explained this theory to Elaine at some point so it's only partially true)


Originally posted by plutoxgirl
Oh, I'm good with detachment



As am I but, for me, good literature (or any other form of escapist entertainment) is all the more enjoyable if you have that "connection" to a character. I've enjoyed plenty of books, movies and tv shows where there's not a single common thread for me to latch on to but nothing is better than reading a book (or watching a movie etc) where, when it ends, you feel like you've just gone thru what one of the characters did.



edit on 25-9-2010 by Crakeur because: I suffer from premature reply-ulation



posted on Sep, 25 2010 @ 12:15 PM
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Originally posted by Crakeur

It's a stupid rule but I have a hard time getting past it.


I like you admit it-

It's fine, that's the first step to start changing traditional rules!- will take time, but ocassionally happen?
let's hope so. ;D



I agree that I should read more of these things but I have a hard time doing it. I have a hard to accepting that some dude is speaking as a woman would, or vice versa. I think about how I'd react to a situation, how every guy I know would react to that situation and then I read how a woman thinks a man might react and, well, it never seems to fit.


Hahah.. well I think you tend to rationalize things a little bit -too much.
I just go with the flow of the book- if interesting of course. You can totally tell that by the first few pages. - either male or female author




On the flip side, I'm not a woman so I'm stuck assuming women would react the way they do in books written by men. This, of course, is an issue all men have and it is highlighted by our belief that, in the event of a fight between two women, eventually, they will tear each other's clothes off and then kiss.


ROFLMAO


(I'm kidding but I do believe Jerry, George and Kramer explained this theory to Elaine at some point so it's only partially true)


Are you talking about Seinfield?-
oh god. I HATE that show. haha!
No, no hate actually, just profound dislike.


As am I but, for me, good literature (or any other form of escapist entertainment) is all the more enjoyable if you have that "connection" to a character. I've enjoyed plenty of books, movies and tv shows where there's not a single common thread for me to latch on to but nothing is better than reading a book (or watching a movie etc) where, when it ends, you feel like you've just gone thru what one of the characters did.


Yeah, I hear you.

It's great when you find the connection to the character...
and when you don't, there's always some kind of bond to the story.



edit on 25/9/10 by plutoxgirl because: Crakeur's edition



posted on Sep, 25 2010 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by plutoxgirl
 


a good story will suck you in, regardless of your connection with the characters but there's nothing better than closing a book and wanting more, not because the story was incomplete but, rather, because you've become attached to the characters in such a way that the ending almost feels like you've lost a friend. every so often I'll see a movie or read a book and I'll spend time afterward thinking of where they go from there, what happens etc.

Stephen King and Peter Straub once wrote a book together called The Talisman. Great book, totally wild story about a boy, an alternate universe of sorts and the usual straub and king creepiness. Many years later they came out with a sequel. It wasn't as good but it was so damned cool catching up with the characters.

Oddly enought I'm not always a fan of series books so, when an author I like writes a book and then follows it up with another about the same characters, if I don't totally love the style and writing, I'm done with them. Very few authors have managed to keep me going with series types books, mainly because they become the same thing in a different location. I think those attempts at capitalizing on a character's popularity tend to reduce the quality of work, resulting in formulaic stories that are pumped out as quickly as possible.

Of the few authors who do write about the same character, Charlie Huston set limits so he didn't have a never ending series for his, John Burdett doesn't pump them out that quickly, allowing the desire for more to fester, Daniel Silva might be the only one who does fast work but his stories are always a lot of fun.

I ramble, therefore I am.





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