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Discovered after 90 years: Diary complete with amazing paintings and drawings that bring to life the

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posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 12:13 AM
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Discovered after 90 years: Diary complete with amazing paintings and drawings that bring to life the horror faced by Tommies in the WWI trenches Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...


www.dailymail.co.u k

A fresh insight into life in the trenches in World War One has been discovered in a series of amazing sketches and drawings found in a soldier's diary hidden away for 90 years.

Lieutenant Kenneth Wootton's 120-page journal vividly brings to life the horror of major WWI battles, and even includes detailed ink drawings of tanks and battle movements.

Lt Wootton, who was awarded the MC for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, kept a diary from 1915 until 1917, when he was sent home to England after being injured in an explosion.


Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 12:13 AM
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wow i was truely amazed by finding this it realy brings that whole horrible conflict into light and gives insight to the things the british had to deal with in those trenches and gives a first person view of what war looked like back then to some one who wasent even alive when it was going on just figured people would like this

www.dailymail.co.u k
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 12:20 AM
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if any one wants to help a posting illeterate post some of the images from the site i would be deeply indebted as ive had a kinda rough day i cant begin to try to deal with something i might in fact fail at



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by KilrathiLG
 


I could seriously not imagine life in them trenches...

Especially when full of mud, fallen soldiers and enemy snipers all day.....

It does make you understand how they were not scared when called to attack,
anything to get out of there.....



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 01:21 AM
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yeah its just mind boggeling the choices they had stay in the trench get trench foot starve freeze liveing in poo and waste only to be told to march accross an open feild to charge machine gun nests,snipers mines barbed wire or face consequences of being shot by there own officers(think there was a movie that talked about this)

and lets not forget the humanity that was some times shown example the xmas football game i cant think of anything like that happining since but i may be wrong and as a question did we stop wartime activitys in Afghanistan and Iraq during Ramadan? or done anything remotely like the xmas day game?


edit on 22-9-2010 by KilrathiLG because: to ask a question and raise a point



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 02:28 AM
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Amazing stuff. Art from soldiers is the closest thing to combat, in my opinion.


edit on 22-9-2010 by Dimitri Dzengalshlevi because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 04:00 AM
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reply to post by KilrathiLG
 

What a great find. Glad the great granddaughter decided to share it. Here's a couple of embedded pictures per your request.


Untouched for more than 90 years: The soldier's great granddaughter inherited a mass of old books and papers and discovered the diary lying inside. Here he depicts the British Mark IV tank as it plows across no-man's land.





Detailed: Lieutenant Kenneth Wootton's incredible diary includes poignant ink drawings.
Sour ce



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 04:38 AM
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Stunning, thanks for sharing. Very poignant. Goes hand in hand with my favourite WW1 war poet Siegfried Sassoon:

"How to Die"


Dark clouds are smouldering into red
While down the craters morning burns.
The dying soldier shifts his head
To watch the glory that returns;
He lifts his fingers toward the skies
Where holy brightness breaks in flame;
Radiance reflected in his eyes,
And on his lips a whispered name.

You'd think, to hear some people talk,
That lads go West with sobs and curses,
And sullen faces white as chalk,
Hankering for wreaths and tombs and hearses.
But they've been taught the way to do it
Like Christian soldiers; not with haste
And shuddering groans; but passing through it
With due regard for decent taste.



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 06:55 AM
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absolutely awesome pictures, they seem to get the picture of WW1 across better than photos, and his style of drawing looks more advanced for that period in time. (or that might just be me)

once again brilliant find and brilliant pictures.

Peae



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 08:54 AM
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Let's don't forget that it wasn't just British soldiers in the trenches but French, Americans, Canadians, Anzacs, South Africans, British colonials, as well as Germans, Austrians and Italians living the hell that was trench warfare. Mud, disease, lice and artillery fire were their constant companions. Casualty rates were astoundingly high, particularly for whichever side was on the offensive.

That anyone could envision another world war after the horrors of the "war to end all wars" explains why both England and France were so unprepared for the German blitzkrieg of May, 1940.

Those drawings are exquisite! The man obviously had a great deal of artistic talent.

My grandfather was wounded during the fight for Belleau wood. He never spoke of his service and I only learned of it after his passing. People from those generations were tough as nails. He carried shrapnel in his spine for over 70 years and never complained. I salute him and all those who lost so much during the first world war.



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 09:00 AM
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Lieutenant Kenneth Wootton had fantastic artistic skill!!!

For such an artist as himself it must have been horrible to fight in those situations.

His art might have been his saviour through those dark days. Amazing.

VVV



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 09:05 AM
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Originally posted by Three_moons
reply to post by KilrathiLG
 



That's a beautiful and accurate ink drawing of Ypres' (B) belfry anno 1917.
here's the same location on three different moments in time:




edit on 22/9/10 by Movhisattva because: (B)



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 09:12 AM
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Those last three pics say it all....What a WASTE!
Build it up, blow it up, build it again.......pity we couldnt do the same for the soldiers.....
War has cost humanity the stars.......



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 09:43 AM
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The Parable of the Young Man and the Old
by Wilfred Owen (Soldier and Poet)

So Abram rose, and clave the wood, and went,
And took the fire with him, and a knife.
And as they sojourned, both of them together,
Isaac the first-born spake, and said, My Father,
Behold the preparations, fire and iron,
But where the lamb for this burnt-offering?
Then Abram bound the youth with belts and straps,
And builded parapets the trenches there,
And stretched forth the knife to slay his son.
When lo! an angel called him out of heaven,
Saying, Lay not thy hand upon the lad,
Neither do anything to him. Behold,
A ram, caught in a thicket by its horns;
Offer the Ram of Pride instead of him.
But the old man would not so, but slew his son,
And half the seed of Europe, one by one.



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by KilrathiLG
and lets not forget the humanity that was some times shown example the xmas football game i cant think of anything like that happining since but i may be wrong and as a question did we stop wartime activitys in Afghanistan and Iraq during Ramadan? or done anything remotely like the xmas day game?


edit on 22-9-2010 by KilrathiLG because: to ask a question and raise a point


The soldiers involved in such events were heavily punished by senior command. Fraternizing with the enemy was very much a no no. Sad, but true.



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 08:04 AM
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My Grandfather was a messenger running messages from command to the front lines.
On one such run he was turned back from the front line fray by a lower rank officer as the area he needed to get to was being desimated and was simply a no go area.
On his return to HQ he was arrested for not carying out his order - He was due to be shot for cowardice some 3 days later. At almost the last minute the officer who had turned him back came forward and so my Grandfather was reprieved. Wonder how many were shot at dawn in error. Soldiers are mere canon fodder for ones who hide behind desks and never experience the Hell they help to create. They are not like leaders of other times that lead from the front.
Did you know that during that during the Napoleonic Wars that the Rothschild family financed both sides so as to hedge their bets. It was a Rothschild who reported back to England that Napoleon had won the battle/war at Waterloo - this sent panic through banking circles and the stock market collapsed - Of course the Rothschilds bought up everything and so gained control over banking as they do today.



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by CynicalM
reply to post by KilrathiLG
 


I could seriously not imagine life in them trenches...

Especially when full of mud, fallen soldiers and enemy snipers all day.....

It does make you understand how they were not scared when called to attack,
anything to get out of there.....


Hmmm, I wonder if fear was the main motivator. I believe the coc aine and opium that was handed out on all sides was the biggest contributor for forgetting your fear....

That's an interesting history lesson to read up on...( start with the Dutch Cocaine Factory)

Peace




edit on 23-9-2010 by operation mindcrime because: added info



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