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Jupiter will remain close to Earth for weeks

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posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 05:46 PM
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JUPITER AT ITS BEST: Jupiter will remain close to Earth for weeks to come, tonight is the closest of all. To be honest i saw no difference!!


First some moon shot's, after that Jupiter





posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 06:58 PM
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Beautiful. Thank you for posting this. Love the music too...



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 07:11 PM
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All I can say is WOW! The detail of the moon that you captured was remarkable. The video itself was very well produced. It was a very professional production. May I ask what video software you use? I currently have Adobe Premiere Elements.

Also, if you have a link somewhere to the telescope equipment you use, that would be great as well. I've been thinking about purchasing a telescope myself. Hope to see more videos of yours!



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 07:20 PM
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Did anyone else notice the object dart across the screen around :30?
I'm sure it was a plane or bird or something, but it was moving pretty fast...



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 07:24 PM
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I knew I saw some of Jupiter's moons last night! I was wondering why there were 2-4 lights around it at first but then wow.



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by Bosb33r
 



What the heck is that fast flying thing (across the Moon) at 30 seconds? Satellite?


edit on Fri Sep 24 2010 by Jbird because: replaced large quote



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by holyTerror
Did anyone else notice the object dart across the screen around :30?
I'm sure it was a plane or bird or something, but it was moving pretty fast...


Sorry. I didn't read the replies. Yes! I sure did. What was that? Guess we'll never know.........................



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by holyTerror
 


Saw it. Looked like a bird.



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 08:15 PM
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Source-
blogs.discovermagazine.com...


But Jupiter is a big planet, 140,000 km (86,000 miles) across, almost 11 times wider than the Earth! It’s also a whitish color, so it reflects a lot of sunlight. Its size, reflectivity, and close distance together make it a very bright object in the sky. If you go outside any time after sunset tonight you’ll see it in the east, a luminous beacon glowing brilliantly.

However, some people have been saying that tonight is the best night to see it, and we won’t get a chance to see it like this again for years. Shades of the Mars Hoax! In reality, it doesn’t matter if you go out tonight, or wait a few days. While technically Jupiter is closest right now, it’s not like it’ll be a lot farther away tomorrow night. Here’s why.


Jupiter takes about 12 years to go around the Sun, while Earth takes one. So we can assume Jupiter isn’t moving at all for the moment. If Jupiter, the Earth, and the Sun all lie on a line tonight, then tomorrow night Earth will have moved a little bit off that line (so will Jupiter, but much less). Using a little trig, I was able to figure out that the distance the Earth has moved away from Jupiter in one day is about 23,000 km (14,000 miles).

That’s not a whole lot compared to Jupiter’s vast distance. Adding an additional 23,000 km is really a piddly amount. Even with a big telescope it would be almost impossible to measure any difference!


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I thought that you needed this in the thread.

This is hella cool. Ima see if Ican find that telescope tonight.


ditby




Mod Note: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.









edit on Fri Sep 24 2010 by Jbird because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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Awesome footage! What kind of camera are you using? It was too cloudy for me last night, but like your thread says, the difference between last night and tonight isn't detectable. If the weather clears up tonight I'll broadcast a live view of Jupiter here:
www.ustream.tv...



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 10:37 AM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


I will be sure to keep an eye out for that, it would be great if you can.
For me Jupiter is little more than a tiny white ball, your images are always spectacular.



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


Thanks! The live images are never as good as the stacked images, unfortunately, but you can still see a lot detail even in the live image.



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 01:31 PM
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Thanks for the nice comments!!!

Next time the video's will be a lot better, the weather was not real clear and a lot dew!
even my Telescope Dew Cap didn't work


First of all, the objects @ 0:15, 0:28 & 0:30 its always hard to tell what it is, could be satallite or something


The equipment i use is a Celestron Nexstar 8" some good eyepieces and a pocket Camera from Casio, i film through the eyepiece (Eyepiece projection)
On my youtube channel look on the playlist Telescopes there will you find all information how and what
www.youtube.com...

My video editing software is Magix video pro, or i use the standard windows movie maker


Take care,

Bosb33r



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 02:13 PM
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Originally posted by Bosb33r
The equipment i use is a Celestron Nexstar 8" some good eyepieces and a pocket Camera from Casio, i film through the eyepiece (Eyepiece projection)

That is REALLY GOOD for eyepiece projection. Based on the lunar video I thought for sure it was some kind of prime focus setup. Are you using a threaded mounting like a scopetronix adapter or coupling system to hold the camera in place? I've never been able to get that level of detail out of eyepiece projection, with or without such an adapter, my hat's off to you.



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 09:55 PM
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Here's the link for a live view of Jupiter from my scope right now:
www.ustream.tv...



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 10:48 PM
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Originally posted by Darkeligos
I knew I saw some of Jupiter's moons last night! I was wondering why there were 2-4 lights around it at first but then wow.




you got bionic vision?

We cannot see Jupiters moons with our naked, human eyes.
One needs a tool to see them, telescopes work well. lol

You can see it's moons every night, really.
Just need the telescope.

and with a little patience..
you can watch them move. lol


maybe if you have really, really great binoculars, made for astronomy..

You were probably just seeing stars in the 'background'.
along with your mind already knowing there are moons orbiting the planet. lol
I had a friend who used to do that.


good stuff peoples,

respect to all you spacecases. lol



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by Ahmose
 

Well I sure can't see the moons with my eyes but that doesn't mean nobody can.

Possible sightings thus seem restricted to Ganymede and Callisto. The former is the brightest satellite in the system and can reach an elongation almost as great as the separation of the easy naked-eye double star Alpha Capricorni (380 seconds). Though Callisto is the faintest of the Galilean moons, it can move as far as 10 minutes of arc From Jupiter. Why then are sightings so rare and so difficult? The answer, of course, lies in the aberrations of the eye. which cause the brilliant planet to display spikes and flares that hide the moons. But eyes differ greatly in the amount of spurious flares seen when a bright point source is viewed.

www.denisdutton.com...



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by ngchunter
Here's the link for a live view of Jupiter from my scope right now:
www.ustream.tv...

Nevermind, ustream has seen fit to ban me, claiming I'm infringing on someone else's copyright. It looks like someone may have filed a false report against me. I will be looking into this and pursuing the person responsible with the possibility of legal action.



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 11:03 AM
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Originally posted by holyTerror
Did anyone else notice the object dart across the screen around :30?
I'm sure it was a plane or bird or something, but it was moving pretty fast...

That video was zoomed in quite closely to the Moon, so the object could have been close to the camera, and thus only cover a short distance -- Therefore, it may not have been moving that fast (i.e., maybe at bird or insect speed)
 


Originally posted by Ahmose
...maybe if you have really, really great binoculars, made for astronomy...]

Actually, relatively "average" binoculars could be used to view the 4 main Jovian moons. I can see them well through 25X binoculars and have seen them through 16X binoculars -- although not nearly as well. It's important to keep the binoculars steady somehow, either by resting them against something, or preferably using a tripod (although not everyone has a binocular tripod).

People have filmed Jupiter's moons using the zoom on a camcorder:



edit on 9/23/2010 by Soylent Green Is People because: my small binocs are 16x, NOT 10x as I originally wrote



posted on Sep, 23 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


When you fixed the USTREAM channel pls let me know looking forward to see your vid!

Is USTREAM for free i saw some video's that are over 1 hour



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