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Some great cover ups about dead fish...

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posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 02:27 PM
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As I watched this video it was almost too much to take! The reporter is either part of this elaborate cover up or she is as brain dead and uninformed as she could possibly be.

The video report is about tens of thousands of fish washing up on shore on a S. Jersey beach, the people in the video simply refuse to associate any of this as a health danger or connect it to what happened hundreds of miles away at Deep water.

For many people the event was finalized when BP said the well was dead. Accepting blindly, the TV commercials and BP spokespeople who show true concern for what they did and promises to remain until no oil is found, found.

Meanwhile the toxic chemical element corexit is still being dispersed and continues to kill aquatic life and endanger humans as well as the very balance of our ecosystem as birds are beginning to fly North with stop overs for food found for ever in the past on the Gulf shores which are now littered with death and poisonings to come.

In the video the reporter actually discusses how these fish are dead from the stress of being caught in fishing nets by a company that catches these fish for health food products as well as animal fertilizer!

Great, now this will cover any future law suits when animals begin to die from the feed and humans contract illness from foods grown in the fertilizer and who eat the livestock who have eaten the the grains, not to mention the health products that use the omega fatty acids for supplements, all now toxic ingredients thanks to BP.

Codex? Food Shortages?

Anyway, watch this report and see what you think, it really is a mess and shows how the public is being swayed into compliance.










edit on 20-9-2010 by antar because: Schpewl checkie




posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


I don't understand how folks from the EPA are clueless about the causes. I guess they either haven't done testing or they are in the pockets of some corporations. I think it is interesting that no crabs or birds are feeding on the dead fish. Are they toxic?
It seems these large fish deaths are not so uncommon and I personally think much of it is due to nitrogen poisoning from all the agriculture runoff into rivers and streams and eventually the sea. There has been a lot of reporting of these deaths globally and I'm not sure if there is an actual increase in these events or just more people able and willing to report it.
Either way, tis sad and to me indicative of something significantly out of balance.

spec



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 04:08 PM
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We're going to see a lot more of this. "Run off" of fertilizers & pesticides have been a problem for decades. Mix in a little crude, a dash of corexit & who knows what sort of nasty brew will develop.

If anyone is waiting for BP, the EPA, or any of the bought & paid for agencys to step up, forget it. They've mastered the non-answer elevating the skill to an art.

If it were me I wouldn't let any member of my family anywhere near that beach or those waters.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 09:53 PM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


In the video it said that the birds were feasting on the dead. I am so sorry to hear that because I knew that if they do and then continue to travel inland other sources and life will be contaminated too.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:00 PM
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reply to post by kno22
 


True and as much as I love the ocean, in all good conscience could not allow my family to swim there either, no matter how pretty it may look.

In the video the woman admits that her family had all been swimming in it and she had an uneasy feeling about it now with all the dead fish. She said it looked like foam floating on the surface at first and they thought it looked odd, but then they noticed a few dead fish here and there and went "Ohh", then on further down they realized it was not foam at all and soon discovered the littered beach with tens of thousands of them.

I am not buying the semi official story of them having died from stress of being caught in nets. BUT that did awaken me to the fact that fishing is still going on and being used in pet foods, animal feed, agriculture fertilizer and HEALTh products!

Yep this was another wake up call. As maddening as it all seems it is a good time to look for secure sources for your health aids, fertilizers for gardening and animal feed. we need to be able to ask the critical questions and have the truth told to us, this is important, but a hassle and you know people would rather simply believe its just over and the concerns are best left to the crazy CTers.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:04 PM
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Hey Antar, Not sure if you been on the projects site in awhile, but this article is along the same lines of your post here.....

University Group Raises Concerns About BP Oil Spill Contaminants in Livestock Feed

Exerpt

Bottom-feeding fish used as hog feed

Meanwhile, despite these concerns, bottom-feeding fish like mullet are currently being caught and eaten all over the Gulf, with the potential risk not being limited to direct human consumption of the fish, but indirectly by mullet being fed to hogs, as Dr. Norma Bowe of Kean University in New Jersey observed a few weeks ago. Striking up a conversation with some fishermen who were hauling in nets full of mullet from a pier in Long Beach, Mississippi, Dr. Bowe found out that one of the men was also a hog farmer who was catching the mullet to feed to his hogs. The hog farmer, who said he fishes from this pier every day, proudly told Bowe to just ask anybody and they’d tell her that his bacon, pork chops, ham hocks, and ribs are the best around, attributing the high quality of the meat from his hogs to their high protein fish diet. And, according to the fishermen that Bowe spoke to, these fish are also used in a variety of other products for both human and pet consumption — from Omega-3 fish oil supplements to cat food. Part of this conversation was caught on video by one of Bowe’s students.

testtherain.com...



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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Great post Antar!Thanks for sharing this with us!I think it is quit funny how this mysterious foam keeps popping up,but,no one seems to connect the dots!Its in my river,and has not gone away yet!!This makes me sick!!How can people be so blind to what is going on around them !!Only when it starts to have an effect on there lives will they pay attention,then,I am afraid,its too late!!..



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:42 PM
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This was a thread about the possibility of the birds eating the dead sea life.

Just thought the two go together pretty well:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:51 PM
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Originally posted by kno22
We're going to see a lot more of this. "Run off" of fertilizers & pesticides have been a problem for decades. Mix in a little crude, a dash of corexit & who knows what sort of nasty brew will develop.

If anyone is waiting for BP, the EPA, or any of the bought & paid for agencys to step up, forget it. They've mastered the non-answer elevating the skill to an art.

If it were me I wouldn't let any member of my family anywhere near that beach or those waters.



If you had bothered to watch the video you would realize that all the fish are the same kind. Also, you would have heard the story about the Omega fish oil company whose nets ripped and spilled these fish which were already mostly dead from stress. This story has nothing to do with fertilizers or pesticides or bp.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:51 PM
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Unless there is a way these fish are coming across phytoplankton or algae that has been contaminated by crude or corexit or the associated fallout, i'm not sure if i can see how this is directly connected to the Gulf/Bp issue.

Does phyto/zooplankton and algae travel that sort of distance?

Couple interesting things about menhenden i just learned.

They are filter feeders. They eat small phytoplankton and whatnot. they also eat algae.

I'd be curious to know if these fish migrate long distances. like from the gulf to the atlantic. The species of menhenden off the Atlantic coast doesnt appear to migrate from the Gulf region, as they appear to spawn mate live and die in relatively close territory, and are separate breeds. Although I suppose one could say they came across a poisoned batch of plankton or algae that somehow made its way up from the Gulf.

apparently, this fish is harvested for numerous agricultural uses. it is easy to harvest because it swims and feeds in dense schools. this article says the fishery taking responsibility is called "Lund".

www.newjerseynewsroom.com...

heres a brief video talking about one specific company's menhaden harvest practices.





Seems noteworthy that they now say this wasn't due to decreased oxygen levels, but that a large die off last month was.



The incident was not related to low dissolved oxygen levels. Low oxygen levels are believed to have caused the massive die-off of menhaden last month along an eight-mile stretch of Delaware Bay in Cape May County.


I would think if they were trying to cover up this being related to the oil spill, they wouldnt be so quick to attribute a recent fish kill to depleted oxygen levels (an effect on the water where microbes are consuming corexit-suspended crude.).

Unless there is a way these fish are coming across phytoplankton or algae that has been contaminated by crude or corexit or the associated fallout

in fact, they have apparently attributed three recent fish kills to depleted oxygen levels. and this article is reporting as of yesterday that officials were attributing this to depleted oxygen




The incident remains under investigation, but officials said today that they believe low oxygen levels caused the wash-up. It was the third massive fish die-off in the region over the past three months. The first occurred July 12 in Cape May Point, followed by another last month when hundreds of thousands menhaden washed ashore along the Delaware Bay. Both of those incidents also were blamed on low oxygen levels in the water.


www.nj.com...

With all the S$#@ in the sea, it shouldn't be surprising. But is it all directly connected to the BP spill?




en.wikipedia.org...

fishbull.noaa.gov...

www.nj.com...

islandpress.org...





edit on 20-9-2010 by justadood because: me poor grammar




edit on 20-9-2010 by justadood because: fix video embed code



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by Cloudsinthesky
 


Not today, but yes I check in daily on the test site. I signed up for the email alerts too so it helps with my busy schedule recently. So much great info all in one place, it is almost overwhelming the continious stream of evidence and yet the simple truth is that it continues to become a greater threat to our entire country and planet as these types of reports make their way through the propaganda.

If everyone insists the sky is blue, eventually the easy out is to believe it so.



Dont give up, dont give in...



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 11:36 PM
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It will take the death of people before the cries are heard.

Even if this was an "Industrial Accident" whereby the fish were accidentally released and died as a result of the stress of netting them, the fact remains that the lives of these fish have been wasted needlessly and with "fault". So the EPA or whomever should step up and fine this Omega III company per fish-head. The clean-up should be conducted by the Company and any dispensation for loss of income of any coastal businesses!

Personally, I did hear the woman say that, "the birds won't even eat them", but then 3/4 through the video they switched over to another beach where only the reporter says, "the birds will have a feast over this", and is clearly her own personal opinion or that of her "controllers". I don't believe it unless I see it, and in the video I see no birds eating a ton of dead fish. If anyone has ever been around seagulls they are the scavengers of the sea, they will eat anything that floats, even plastic.

It will take the death of people before the masses wake up, but even then they will act as if it is an isolated incident until it hits home. No more fish for me and now no more Pork! Sorry, if I don't raise it myself then I am not going to eat it. S&F



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 12:06 AM
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Did anyone else get a sinking feeling during the past hurricanes off the east coast as they headed north towards the Florida keys?

I mean and does raise a good question in that if it is something along the lines of plankton or even drifting algae, and possibly in conjunction with the oxygen depletion, it could be from the drift along the oceans bottom when the currents were sent that way in the storms, makes sense to me and the timing also seems correct.



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 09:21 PM
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Originally posted by Greensage
It will take the death of people before the cries are heard.

Even if this was an "Industrial Accident" whereby the fish were accidentally released and died as a result of the stress of netting them, the fact remains that the lives of these fish have been wasted needlessly and with "fault". So the EPA or whomever should step up and fine this Omega III company per fish-head. The clean-up should be conducted by the Company and any dispensation for loss of income of any coastal businesses!


It is. They are. They have.

www.newjerseynewsroom.com...



Unless someone can show me how these fish, who live and feed off the Atlantic Coast were effected by the BP spill or associated corexitt i'm still going to say this isnt even related to the forum.



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by justadood
 


These fish, Menhaden, have a migratory range from the Yucatan Peninsula to Nova Scotia. Sadly there will be no testing results revealed to make any determination at all.

I didn't really see where this company is being fined, the article did indicate that they would be "cleaning" this mess up which could as easily be speculated as "salvageable" for animal consumption. So the scariness of it penetrates deeper than we will ever know, unless we are the consumers of such things.

I am sure it is nothing to worry ourselves over!



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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Originally posted by Greensage
reply to post by justadood
 


These fish, Menhaden, have a migratory range from the Yucatan Peninsula to Nova Scotia. Sadly there will be no testing results revealed to make any determination at all.


No,

Wiki mentions their 'range' is from the "Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico to Tampa Bay, Florida, finescale menhaden from the Yucatán to Louisiana, yellowfin menhaden from Louisiana to Virginia."
That means that's where the speciies lives. Not their migratory routes. This is not a migratory fish.

wiki continues:

"The Atlantic menhaden ranges from Jupiter Inlet, Florida, to Nova Scotia. The various species of menhaden occur anywhere from estuarine waters outwards to the continental shelf."

But i dont see anything saying that a species that lives off the jersey coast would be the same one off the coast of florida. Again, i just dont see anything saying they migrate to that degree at all. See my first post for numerous links and video.

en.wikipedia.org...






I am sure it is nothing to worry ourselves over!


Oh, it certainly is. Watch the youtube video in my first post in this thread. I'm just saying it doesnt appear to be related to the BP spill, unless they somehow encountered contaminated plankton or algae along the way.

now, if this same species came up dead off the coast of florida, or in the gulf, then obviously it would stand to reason it was connected.
But as it stands, it really doesnt appear to belong in the deepwater forum. If you can show me info that says that the species migrate from the gulf to the atlantic, i will gladly concede it is possible.






edit on 21-9-2010 by justadood because: ital code




edit on 21-9-2010 by justadood because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


antar, can you please show me how this is related to the BP/Deepwater issue AT ALL? I have posted twice so far offering numerous reasons why this isnt related to this forum. Can you debunk me please?



posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by justadood
 


Well Just....... I guess she has you on mute......Many do you know!!

Not that I can say either way on the fish kill up in NJ........But..............Its plausable to be linked to the Gulf crap.......

"WILMINGTON, N.C. (Sept. 22, 2010) — The Coast Guard is responding to reports of an unknown substance in the water discovered by boaters in several locations off the North Carolina coast Wednesday.

According to Coast Guard pollution investigators, it is described as a sticky, brown substance with no odor present, which is consistent with attributes of algae.

“Coast Guard pollution investigators are testing samples from multiple locations to make a final determination of whether or not hydrocarbons are present in the water off the coast of North Carolina,” said Cmdr. Steve McGee, commanding officer of Marine Safety Unit Wilmington."

The reports that we have been getting is that its just like what was found down in the gulf region..........a brown slimy substance...........

These are new reports so they have not been tested yet..........but its only 650 ocean miles away from NJ shore line.........Not far at all........



posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 11:17 PM
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JAD,

Although dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico are nothing new, this is one of the most significant years for the death of countless species in large numbers as never before seen. At such a promising and critical time this devastating event has put all of the progress towards creating solutions for solving and reducing those effects of seasonal dead zones in a state of limbo.

One thing which was discovered after the past hurricanes Rita and Katrina, it gave the ocean the chance to recuperate and helped bring oxygen from the bottom to the surface reducing the extent of the depleted oxygen levels which helped to replenish some of the die-offs from prior years when a combination of off shore drilling coupled with poor farming practices began to seriously concern scientist's and researchers.

In 2002 the dead zones had reached and peaked with an all time high of over 8,000 square miles. This has become a very serious situation not only in the Gulf of Mexico but in other areas worldwide, so this is where the problem and wide reaching extent of the Gulf spill needs to be examined and acted upon and not ignored and dismissed. We also must remain vigilant to keep the priority and responsibility for this emergency squarely in BPs hands and not allow the distance to be an opt out for them, we knew going in this was going to far reaching and it has proven to be so. You only have to see the emerging tarballs and other findings related to the spill to know it is true.

When looking at the natural and irresponsible creation of dead zones in the past, you can now add to the mix of 'possible culprits' corexit and other toxic dispersants used to hide and sink the oil from the deepwater leak.

Never before have we seen especially after several tropical depressions and hurricanes along the Gulf and Florida the extent of aquatic death in massive numbers. It really does not take an Einstein to figure out the connection.



Listen I am really tired and going to show you an older but relevant article about life in the gulf and the challenges which were being dealt with before this happened and how this is presented in the correct forum with all due respect to the murder of millions and millions of fish, reptiles and fowl by BP.




Despite the dead zone's gradual expansion, scientists argue that we have the capability to reduce it. Limiting the use of nitrogen-rich fertilizers, implementing water conservation and recycling practices, and preventing sewage leaks and runoff from waste treatment plants should all help to keep nitrogen levels down. In 1998, the U.S. Congress passed the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act, which called for examining the research and working to contain harmful algal blooms and hypoxia. Researchers at universities and the NOAA are using modeling techniques to estimate how much of certain compounds need to be removed in order to reduce the dead zone's size.

Ironically, the dead zone could be positively affected by an active hurricane season. A major contributing factor to dead zones is when water becomes stratified -- warm, fresh water settles on top of colder, saltier water. This stratification limits the aeration of deeper waters as algal blooms settle to the bottom and decay. A hurricane could stir up the Gulf waters, dispersing some of the algae and partially replenishing oxygen levels. The NOAA predicts seven to 10 hurricanes for 2007, with three to five of them qualifying as "major hurricanes" [Source: NOAA]. While these storms may stir up the dead zone and possibly increase the brown shrimp catch, they will come at a time when Gulf Coast communities are still recovering from the devastation of hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

science.howstuffworks.com...



posted on Sep, 24 2010 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by Cloudsinthesky
 


Yes algae is normal as the article above states, however this new brown goo is not, it is something more sinsiter than nature eliminates naturally as a bi product of enviromental attributes.

Also imo, this is what happened to the algae, it mixed with the corexit, oil and other natural elements flowing from the deepwater horizon site, and even after several hurricanes it did not help as in the past but instead brought the goop up to the surface for all to see. BP cant get out of it, God wont allow it evidently...



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