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Recap of C to C show: Behind Conspiracy Theories

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posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:48 AM
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George Knapp was joined by author David Aaronovitch for an examination of the origins of conspiracy theories, why people believe them, and also to make an argument for a true skepticism based on a thorough knowledge of history and a strong dose of common sense. Based on his research, Aaronovitch defined a conspiracy theory as "an explanation for something which is far more complicated and removes responsibility from the obvious people to the not obvious people, in situations where the more obvious explanation is more likely."

Aaronovitch detailed a number of problematic attributes which he feels "attach themselves" to conspiracy theories and those who subscribe to them:

* Conspiracy theories do not allow for accident, incompetence, or coincidence.

*The official version of events "almost always, at its heart" has anomalies that cannot be reconciled.

*Scholars, usually with exaggerated credentials, are named as proponents of the theory.

*The theory is anti-elite and, thus, the theorist becomes "kind of a minuteman" warning the populace about the "powers that be." ( paging Mr. patriots4truth ! )

On why there needs to be skepticism about conspiracy theories, Aaronovitch used the example of recent developments in the UK which arose as a result of rumors that vaccines cause autism. He explained that this theory became so pervasive that people began to stop having their children vaccinated. In turn, Aaronovitch lamented, the measles virus re-emerged back into the population after it had been eradicated in previous years. "This stuff has to be combated because it does have consequences for people," he declared. On a far larger scale, he noted that the widespread belief in the fraudulent Protocols of the Elders of Zion in Nazi Germany acted as a proverbial "warrant for genocide" for many misguided players in WWII.

Aaronovich also looked at a number of suspect issues surrounding a variety of conspiracy theories. With regards to the Moon Landing hoax, he observed that to complete such a fabrication would require far more manpower than the actual lunar landing itself. In addition to that, he pointed out that lunar conspiracy theorists often focus solely on the Apollo 11 landing and ignore the many other trips made to the moon. Regarding 9/11, Aaronovich conceded that the official version of events is also a conspiracy theory, but that its very simplicity is what makes this theory much more plausible than a grand overarching plan by nefarious forces inside the US government. To that end, he noted that if the government was truly clever enough to "organize conspiracies," then they would have planted WMDs in Iraq rather than invade the country and find none. "It would have been a much simpler thing to do," he mused, "and yet they didn't."




posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by RKWWWW
 


WOW DUDE!! close scrutiny with nary a reply yet? to begin, Im a former CtoC listener. it really shifted attitudes about 2 years ago. anyone listening to art bell in 90's through today should feel this way. there was alot less govt trolls allowed on the show. but after the critical rise in anger in late 2008 the govt had to balance out the shows from 2006-2008.. which were very pushing the edge of knowledge to the masses.. many guests today are bogus TPTB trolls..

even Glenn Beck has transformed into a mormon over night (not an insult, just remeber how he used to be ex-mormon).. he really sounds like a practising mormon these days.

you see, net neutrality has never been expalined using examples. but coast to coast has allowed the parasitic tentacles of govt to attach itself..just one last death twitch before rigamortise sets into the rotting corpse our forefathers gave life to???



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 03:51 AM
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"On Feb 9, 2004, the National Autism Association issued a press release that reported on one of the larger studies under review based on the Center for Disease Control's Vaccine Safety Datalink. Under independent investigation, the Association reported, of the CDC's data children were found to be 27-times more likely to develop autism after exposure to three thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCVs), than those who receive thimerosal-free versions".

So...using the example you quoted, conspiracy theories it seems, arent necessarily the result of wild 'rumours' but rather have a basis of 'fact'.

Funny thing is too, using this example, my nephew was born with autism, yet my father who is an avid 'geneology buff' can find no record of autism in my ancestory. My Brother-in-laws mother claim theres no history of it on her side of the family either. And my sister (the child's mother) suspected a vaccination injection was responsible when he was first diagnosed (many years before I had even read anything about the link between the two).



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