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25% chance of M-class Flare over next 48 hours

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posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


How you can believe astrology doesn't effect the earth is actually laughable

I thought that was knowledge you were born with, but I guess education has taught you the right way




posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by ADUB77
 

Really? You knew about astrology when you were born?
I've learned quite a few things since I was born. I've found most of them quite useful. How to control my bladder and bowels for example.


edit on 9/18/2010 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 08:06 PM
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Originally posted by ADUB77
reply to post by Phage
 


How you can believe astrology doesn't effect the earth is actually laughable

I thought that was knowledge you were born with, but I guess education has taught you the right way


I kind of agree - astrology is a study of the energy of the universe , whilst i perceive astronomy as way of mapping those energies.



posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by mr-lizard
 

Except that astrology and astronomy do not jibe with each other. Astronomy changes, astrology hasn't. Silly astrologers.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



edit on 9/18/2010 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 08:39 PM
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Astrology relates to Astronomy in a lot of ways, but namely the following

The environment in space is more comparable to water than air

So when objects are moving in this environment they create waves.

.So when Jupiter which is a gas giant, a mass 1/1000th of the sun, comes as close as it has in 50 years

Those waves are going to be that much worse and have that much more effect on the earth as we get bombarded

from both the Sun and Jupiter



posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by ADUB77
 

Air is much less dense than water. Space is far, far, less dense than air.
How can space be more comparable to water than air? It can't really be compared to either.

The solar wind (a flow of very, very thin material) moves outward from the Sun. It does not move inward.

But perhaps you are referring to gravitational effects. The influence of the Sun on Earth is only one forth that of the Moon. Jupiter is 1048th the mass of the Sun and it is 4 times farther away. The influence of its gravity (right now) is 0.000006 that of the Moon. The effect of Venus is 8 times greater than that of Jupiter (and still miniscule) when it is at its closest to Earth. Just what effects do you expect to see? A tide that is 0.0006% higher than normal?




edit on 9/18/2010 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 08:54 PM
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From what I've read the X20 of 04.02.01 wasn't directed towards earth so we would be hard pressed to find "effects," however, 'solcomhouse,' 'soho hotshots,' 'spaceweather top flares,' 'Whitley Streiber's unknown country,' 'science daily' all put the largest flare at X25 to X30 or X28 to X30 or X45 depending on the source. This flare was on 11.04.03 and Dr. Ernest Hildner director of NOAA/NASA spaceweather said of it at the time, "This solar flare was the largest I have ever seen. The solar flare that occurred today was so large we do not have a chart high enough to register it. My best guess would be between X25 and X30." One source stated that "some of it was directed toward earth." On some of these sites it is stated that it had to be estimated because the detectors became overloaded. Radio wave band measurements placed it at X45.

The charts on these sites were also interesting because the flare magnitudes seem to be in some kind of escalation mode since 1976. As a lay person, it is difficult to judge the effects of an M or X etc. because it's a question of searching local news articles after the fact to find that out. It is time-consuming but personally rewarding for anyone interested in anomalies.



posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by luxordelphi
 

You're correct the November 2003 flare was greater than that of 2001. A lot greater.

A solar flare is not "directed", they are omnidirectional.
A CME (which may or may not be associated with a flare) is directional.



posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 09:05 PM
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It looks like today NOAA downgraded the probability of an M-class to 10%.

www.swpc.noaa.gov...

Spaceweather.com has yesterday's data on their homepage.

Has anyone subscribed to Space Weather's solar flare phone alert service?

I have, but I have yet to get an "alert". Anyone else having the same problem???



posted on Sep, 18 2010 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 

Very interesting on the omnidirectional solar flare. Does it not then follow the properties of light and particles? but fan instead? or unpredictable because of postulated quantum particles? One of the sites I looked at, think it was the 'socomhouse,' stated that it wasn't directed to earth but that site is primarily an eco-ozone type carry-on and may not be the best information on the properties of flares.



posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by luxordelphi
 

A flare consists of electromagnetic radiation. It radiates in all directions from its source. Think of it as the flash of a very powerful electric arc. A CME is an ejection of material (plasma). As I said, it is directional.

The two are often confused but are two different things.



edit on 9/19/2010 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 01:30 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 

Thanks for that...very reassuring. I begin to understand why an M is not a very big deal when even an X is not directed. It's always good to know where not to look.



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 02:53 AM
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Computer still working, is this chit gonna happen or not?




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