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War of the Worlds (nibiru)

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posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 06:39 PM
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As I was watching last night, my partner spotted through the telescope an object go by, a satellite no doubt.

Nice recording tarifa37!! I do hope your video gets more people viewing this. Star for you!




posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 06:40 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
It is quite unlikely that an impact would remove almost everything of a planet and leave a trickle of material behind to suggest a planet had once been there. The asteroid belt is 4% of the mass of the moos. The moon is 1 1/4% of the mass of the Earth. The asteroid belt is thus only 4% of 1 1/4% of the mass of the Earth or about .05% of the mass of the Earth.

Sorry, it makes no sense to claim that somehow 99.95% of the planet is gone.


Unless that 99.95% of the planet was knocked out of orbit into another, more longer orbit or perhaps even out of the solar system altogether. Think about it if the planet only skimmed, it would be sufficient enough to leave a small amount of its mass and knock it into a new trajectory.

Just a thought.

Peace.
ALS



edit on 20-9-2010 by ALOSTSOUL because: I have the right! lol



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by Khaaaaaan!!
 


Thank you for explaining that to me...

I must say that you know what you are talking about, I give you applause for that.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by css1981
 


and Thank you for that, I feel a little relieved.

I borrowed a digital camera, and the skies look promising tonight



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by Khaaaaaan!!
 


That's a neat test you ran. It's good to work with people that don't know what to expect. It's easy for people to "meet expectations" so to speak and report seeing something that might or might be there. Cheers.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 08:23 PM
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I read this a few weeks ago, I wonder if it could have anything to do with the Nibiru theory?
logicend.com...
Maybe Phage will see this post and give us a more learned opinion on it. It's definately an interesting theory, to say the least.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by ALOSTSOUL
 


If the planet were impacted such that it would be knocked out into an orbit that today necessarily would not enter the orbit of the known planets, then the energy would have shattered the planet. An impact could not be a nudge that "gently" moves the planet. The amount of energy would have destroyed the planet and left a lot more debris behind. The lack of debris is what makes a destroyed or "moved" planet so unlikely.

The mass of the asteroid belt is something like the mass of Pluto or Eris. So move out to the Kuiper belt and it is 20 to 200 times more massive than the asteroid belt. Even at 200 times the asteroid belt it is barely an earth mass and spread all over the place. It's over 70,000 pieces that we can detect from Earth today.

Just as the asteroid belt is not a demolished planet, the Kuiper belt is not a demolished planet.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 08:58 PM
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Certainly a star and flag must you have


I was outside tonight and through my binonoculars I saw Jupiter and the four moons. It's the first time I have witnessed it with my own eyes, I've also managed to see Saturn too but this.....this was very humbling to look at a macro solar system within a system if that makes sense


I did get a few snaps too, I dont own a Digi SLR yet so my point and shoot had to do.
img192.imageshack.us...

Hope it's not too shabby
P.S The reason for the blur was a 6 second exposure >.<


edit on 20-9-2010 by Ctankep because: Correcting the link in post.




edit on 20-9-2010 by Ctankep because: Excuses given.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:02 PM
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Originally posted by SquirrelNutz

Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by SquirrelNutz
 


The asteroid belt has a mass that is only 4% of the moon's mass. Certainly not enough material there to form a planet.


Uh, yeah.... NOW! After a huge impact, you think all the material is just gonna stay there?! I'm sure a lot of it drifted off out of our solar system, or was even absorbed into the masses of our other planets, or most likely the sun!


[Seriously, that's your argument?! - ha ha - do you actually think before you type, or just begin attacking every thread/thought that doesn't fall in line with your pre-conceived notions? Common theme for you. I'm only suggesting the possibilities and keeping an open mind. I suggest you do the same.






edit on 9/20/2010 by SquirrelNutz because: removed personal attack



According to Sitchen, a large chunk was ripped off earth(Tiamat) and became the asteroid belt.

I don't see what Europa has to do with a planet nibiru either. The ancient Sumerians did also speak of the sun sending out rockets. I think this interstellar cloud behind the sun is very interesting. I don't know, if we'll ever know what Nibiru is, but I don't think Sitchen is 100% accurate. His planet theory is all based on the one cylinder seal showing the planets and that may not be the sun in the center, but he claims it is.



Very interesting thread, Khaaaaaan!



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


You keep giving stats about 99.95% this and 4% that, and I'm failing to find the connection.

- Ceres is considered a "dwarf planet"
- Ceres currently resides in - and is considered part of - the asteroid belt.
- Anything that would be comprised of THIS 'planetoid' would be a bigger planet, itself
- If the moon were not our moon, it would be ALSO be considered a 'dwarf' planet' (any celestial body orbiting a star that is massive enough to be spherical as a result of its own gravity)

The theory that another planet existed at some point between Mars and Jupiter is not negated by ANYthing you've posted.

Keep swinging.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:50 PM
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I tried to capture what I was seeing tonight, sadly my World is a shaky one and no matter how fast of a speed I put to the camera I seemed to get the most erratic shots. One did manage to look half-way decent.




edit on 9/20/2010 by Greensage because: changed link



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by Onboard2
 


Sitchin was making up stuff left and right. He shoehorned stuff to meet his vision of how myth was history. His claims as you point out are based on very little and his interpretations of these scanty issues is clearly disputed by real archaeologists.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 10:57 PM
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reply to post by SquirrelNutz
 


It is very clear that nothing you've posted substantiates any claim that there was another planet in the solar system regardless of where you choose to place it.

A logical error is the following claim: "Anything that would be comprised of THIS 'planetoid' would be a bigger planet, itself"

That does not follow from anything you posted.

It is clear that there is not enough material not already in a planet and within the orbits of the known planets to form a new planet. It is likely that there is not enough material within the Kuiper belt and the asteroids to form a new planet.

There simply is not enough mass to form a new planet. End of story.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 11:03 PM
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I find it good to see that the planets inspire as much awe in others as it does in me. I love looking up. It's great. There is so much to see from the unexpected fireball to brilliant light of Venus.

I recall the night I was coming back from a trip in the back country and I saw 2 people by a scope. I ran over and asked if they had located Halley's comet. They were checking it out as it was headed away. It was the last time I got to see the comet as it headed away from the Earth. I had been watching it for 16 months and then it was too far away for me to see again.

The planets look great to the naked eye and they look great in binoculars or a scope. I'm really impressed with the videos and photos posted. I hope that these inspire more people to join the ranks of amateur astronomers.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 11:03 PM
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Just looked out my window and noticed a very very bright object in the sky. No stars are visable at all. only this bright object, i think its in the North west direction (most probably a planet, but thought id share it)

Just checked agian now, about 2 minutes later it has faded very much and is not nearly as bright as before.

WIll try take picture(camera on phone is rubbish, will try using webcam )



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 11:07 PM
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Look up what the weather was like in the world in 1963

It is shockingly close to 2010



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 12:30 AM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by SquirrelNutz
 


It is very clear that nothing you've posted substantiates any claim that there was another planet in the solar system regardless of where you choose to place it.

A logical error is the following claim: "Anything that would be comprised of THIS 'planetoid' would be a bigger planet, itself"

That does not follow from anything you posted.

It is clear that there is not enough material not already in a planet and within the orbits of the known planets to form a new planet. It is likely that there is not enough material within the Kuiper belt and the asteroids to form a new planet.

There simply is not enough mass to form a new planet. End of story.


Wow. Reading comprehension is a mother. Every single one of your questions/problems was answered in the post just above yours...

One more time:


- Ceres is considered a "dwarf planet"
- Ceres currently resides in - and is considered part of - the asteroid belt.
- Anything that would be comprised of THIS 'planetoid' would be a bigger planet, itself
- If the moon were not our moon, it would be ALSO be considered a 'dwarf' planet' (any celestial body orbiting a star that is massive enough to be spherical as a result of its own gravity)


Now, STOP - before you start typing - study those 4 bullet points. These are all true and factual statements. Now, read back thru your post I quoted in its entirity. STOP - look back at my bullet points. Each sentence in your post was refuted before you even typed it.

Seriously, were you joking?!



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 04:36 AM
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reply to post by SquirrelNutz
 




Uh, yeah.... NOW! After a huge impact, you think all the material is just gonna stay there?! I'm sure a lot of it drifted off out of our solar system, or was even absorbed into the masses of our other planets, or most likely the sun!


Just read a post a few pages back talking about a huge comet that entered our inner system in 2003/4.

It's apparently on a 37,000 year orbit..perhaps this is the bulk of remnants, catapulted out on a wide orbit after impact. The Asteroid belt, could be only a few bits that were cleaved off from the main body.



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 04:56 AM
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Originally posted by Khaaaaaan!!
The outside moon on the left side should be Europa.

wow that is nice for not having a tripod.
Thanks, I do have a tripod however its sometimes quicker and just as effective to use a jumper or some such thing that is close to hand then place the camera on it at the right angle to get the shot. Obviously dont touch it then it should record as good as a tripod.



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 05:32 AM
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Quality views of Jupiter from the Midlands last night - saw the 4 visable moons no problems with camcorder and scope.

Great video and pictures btw



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