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Was San Bruno "natural gas explosion" a meteorite?

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posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


Single house explosions due to natural gas leaks have left craters; why would this much larger explosion due to natural gas not also leave a crater?




posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


hm... Doesn't look like the "explosion" crater that I would expect to see from a gas explosion causing 100 foot fireballs...

That doesn't really add up to me... personally



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


Yes, I think it would. Meteor impact sites tens to have a 'berm', if you will, of debris, ringing the crater.

But I do not have expert knowledge, I am only basing this on pictures I have seen. Any situation could be different.



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by InvisibleAlbatross
 

This is the scene from a 2008 Sacramento-area PG&E natural gas explosion:


No way was yesterday's massive blast that destroyed 53 homes and gouged a 50-foot crater in the ground a residential natural gas explosion.



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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There has recently been two strikes that the "MSM" has refused to report. One strike was in Columbia and the other one was in Mexico. Now we get something very bizarre like this.............



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by Ouroborus2012
 


Weird, I was thinking about what would cause a gas line to ignite last night when the story first broke, and the only things I could come up with were; gas built up in the sewers and the surrounding areas and someone lit the BBQ or their gas stove and boom, and I thought, hmm meteor? (Any other Ideas on how a gas line would be ignited?) But then I dismissed it, because I couldn't come up with a plausible reason as to why they would want to hide that.

But now that I think about it more, I would assume if they had reported it as a meteor strike the people would want to know if anyone knew it was coming and if someone did know ( NASA ), I'm pretty sure there would be some P'd off people right now, so I can see them hiding it. I mean most of us knew about two asteroids passing between the earth and moon. What was it one at .2 LD and .7 LD?

Sorry Ouroborus, the reason I responded to was to ask if it would be possible that it wasn't "fragment" of the asteroid, but possibly the whole thing? Is it plausible that one of the asteroids, as it passed the earth, got sucked into its gravity, causing it to return to earth, what a day later? Some hours later? Seems almost perfect timing and I could be wrong, but say the asteroid, caught in earth's gravity, made one or half an orbit, then down?

Anyway, at this point I'm curious, and I suppose all we can do is hope for some accurate info. S&F nice catch OP.



edit on 9/10/2010 by JohnnyR because: re worked some wording for clarity



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 05:37 PM
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So lets think of this possibility,.
What if the line that runs through the ground ruptured,
given that this is in an known quake zone, this could have happened.
Now, gas will stay in a low location, so if the underground area was porous,
the gas could have built up and all it takes is something like a pilot lite to set it off.
So unlike the post of the exploded house, this would have been harbored under the surface,
till it was ignited. giving the possibility of creating a crater like the one seen.



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 

You bring up one example of someone seeing something in the sky prior to the explosion. To support this you bring up a story about a 300 foot meteorite crater that hasn't been found and another story that's questionable about an asteroid warning of the big one a couple of years from now. Is there some connection I'm missing besides that they all fall from the sky?

ATS links
Link
Link

Your next quote doesn't even mention anything falling from the sky but rather people looking up because they heard "a low deep roar". Is that what meteorites sound like and how do average people know that? The article does mention neighbors smelling gas in the neighborhood for a number of weeks and also references another deadly explosion a few years ago by PG&E, but I guess that's not relevant. You even state that we can't trust the corrupt MSM in another post yet you're using them as a reference and twisting it to fit your agenda.


Contrary to your belief, and with another reference to the corrupt MSM that you're again citing, craters can occur from impacts and explosives. I guess this source was acceptable since they support your agenda to some degree by comparing it to "something you'd see in Iraq or Afghanistan" which conjures up the image of an impact from above. Go ahead and google "explosive crater" and read a few links and look at some pictures. You may understand that a crater can be formed by an explosive event above, at or below ground level. There's even an app that you can calculate the crater size for explosions and impacts here. Have you ever seen the crater from an underground nuclear explosion? What about a volcano crater? Neither of those are impact craters, are they? Implying that an explosion from below the ground cannot produce a crater is nothing but ignorant.



edit on 9/10/2010 by Three_moons because: spelling



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by GoldenFleece
No way was yesterday's massive blast that destroyed 53 homes and gouged a 50-foot crater in the ground a residential natural gas explosion.


I tried questioning this in the other thread and was basically called a Sorchal Faal nut. I don't understand how the explosion could have been so massive, and whenever I ask somebody to show the science behind it, I'm told that it's obvious and there's no need.


edit on 9/10/2010 by SonicInfinity because: Fixed quote



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyR
 


I dunno man, I guess it depends on the meteor size... I heard about the 2 meteors but didn't do any research in to how large they were... Normally when they report ones like that, they are a decent size. So, my guess is that it probably wasn't the shabang that hit but, possibly a fragment?!?!?!

Like you said before, from a "conspiracy" stand point it would make sense to blame something else to eliminate questions, shift blame and give the chance to get samples... But, unfortunately we'll probably never know the truth! Thankfully we have sites like this for like minded folks to shoot out ideas and we can form our own opinions!!



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by Three_moons
reply to post by GoldenFleece
 

You bring up one example of someone seeing something in the sky prior to the explosion. To support this you bring up a story about a 300 foot meteorite crater that hasn't been found and another story that's questionable about an asteroid warning of the big one a couple of years from now. Is there some connection I'm missing besides that they all fall from the sky?

1) Not "someone" -- numerous people (including an AP journalist) either saw a streak of light or heard a loud roar in the sky prior to the explosion. The connection you're missing is that exploding gas pipelines aren't usually airborne.

2) Are you denying that the Colombian government announced a meteorite impact last week? Is a photo of the incoming meteorite good enough for you?

3) What's questionable about US and Canadian Space Agency astronauts warning about a possible future meteor impact?

And gee, what a coincidence that these two TV news stories ran back to back yesterday:


Got anything else?



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


Good find on the video!

Coast guard and witnesses all seeing a meteor.... Makes it that much more plausible that it's a meteor fragment



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 07:42 PM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


You're link wasn't working, so as I stated there was one example, from the external quote, that I was able to see. I'm not missing anything from the information that I saw.

Yes, I am denying that there was an impact in Columbia. No, a photo of an incoming meteorite does not prove there was an impact. Did you check the links I posted? Show me a crater. Maybe one's available since I last looked.

What does a possible future impact have to do with the fire at San Bruno yesterday?

And again I ask, Is there some connection I'm missing besides that they all fall from the sky?

Here's some more information about potential impact events. Do they have something to do with the present also?
Link
Link
Link

The video you posted talks about a fireball seen at 5AM on September 10th. What does this have to do with an explosion that occurred almost 12 hours earlier?


Several thousand meteors of fireball magnitude occur in the Earth's atmosphere each day.
The American Meteor Society

Out of curiosity, do you believe that a gas line had anything to do with this?


Originally posted by GoldenFleece
Got anything else?


Yes. Would you care to comment on the other three quarters of my previous post?



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by Three_moons
 

Interested in your link to 'the American Meteor Society.' Wasn't able to work it through here so went to the site itself. Established in 2001 by a something Lunsford and seems to be a one-man-show. Your quote from this site was taken out of context and very misleading if you read on to find that sightable objects are considerably less than the microscopic thousands you portrayed. Also curious that the options within the site don't seem to be working. There are 'logs' of fireball sightings starting in 2005 up to and including 2010. This would make for some interesting data if they could actually be pulled up. Is this site still under construction or...?



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 09:49 PM
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I very much doubt a Meteorite had anything to do with what happened in San Bruno.

Look at the still captures I took from one of the video's listed on page 1, the video is called Team Coverage: San Bruno shaken by Huge Explosion.

On this Page at the 7.51 & 8.51 mark.



Here you can see the Crater and the pipe at either end cant see the middle for the water.

Now here is the actual Pipe being examined.




You can see where the Pipe has burst and been torn apart, I can only assume we are seeing the top, however, if it had been struck by a Meteorite the pipe would have been at the very least bent downward, you can see the Pipe has torn itself outwards, clearly it has not been struck by anything, just erupted in a massive give.

Some reports have said these pipe are over 60 years old, and the welding used back then was nothing like what is used today, you can expect this to happen more often if the pipes are like this in other places.

Also the Crater looks noting like an impact Crater, and believe me I know what to look for, there is no uplifting on the edges, the Crater matches the shape of the Pipe, there would be no Pipe left after an impact.

There is one way to tell for sure, but it needs someone close to visit the site and collect some of the rubble which looks like it has been ejected, a magnet would be one way and easily enough, running a magnet along the ground should pick up any spheroids which would be everywhere, there would also be heat damage which would have changed the make up of any rock ejected from the Crater, you would see a lot of changes under a microscope to rocks collected close by but away from the Crater that has not been disturbed.

Sorry but not a Meteorite this time, not enough damage believe it or not, all the damage apart from the Crater was done by fire, not a blast wave.



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 10:05 PM
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Originally posted by camaro68ss
reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


Dude. meteor hits ground braking gas line and exploding. one you need alot of gas chambered and lumped togeather to make a 100 ft fire ball. two you need a flame to ignite the gas. if the pipe just bursted it would not blow up just leak gas till ignited.

I think a meteor hit it and with its intence heat ignited the pipe.


edit on 10-9-2010 by camaro68ss because: (no reason given)



Lollity lol. You dont think there are numerous sources of flame to ignite a ruptured pipe other than a meteor? Go ahead and turn your gas oven on and leave it running. I'm sure it wont explode unless a meteorite hits you :-)



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 10:50 PM
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I doubt seriously if a meteorite was responsible, you would have hundreds of people coming forward by now reporting this.



posted on Sep, 11 2010 @ 02:29 AM
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reply to post by luxordelphi
 

I'm unsure where you got your information from but the AMS is approaching its 100th anniversary with Robert Lunsford as its operations manager.


We are an organization of amateur and professional meteor scientists and observers founded in 1911, with a common goal of studying meteors: - bright fireballs, the annual meteor showers, and the random sporadic meteors that appear every night.
AMS
AMS staff

I don't think the quote I used was taken out of context as I was trying to show that thousands of meteors fall each day, regardless or whether we see them or not. I was trying to show GoldenFleece, and others, that there really could be a coincidence of one being filmed near the time of the explosion without it being connected, as I presume was being suggested. Here's the full quote.


Several thousand meteors of fireball magnitude occur in the Earth's atmosphere each day. The vast majority of these, however, occur over the oceans and uninhabited regions, and a good many are masked by daylight. Those that occur at night also stand little chance of being detected due to the relatively low numbers of persons out to notice them.


The fireball log for September 1 - 7, 2010 has 47 reported fireballs with all sighted in the US except for 1. There are over 1500 reported sightings for the year so far.
AMS fireball log

I don't know how long the website has been active but all the information was available for me.


reply to post by azzllin
 

Thanks for that screen capture that certainly supports what's been told to us as the explosion coming from a large diameter, high pressure gas transmission pipe. It's very reminiscent of seeing a copper water pipe burst from being frozen and the pressures associated with it. I fully agree with the edges of the crater, or lack thereof, also supporting a non impact event.


reply to post by justadood & Boomer1941
 






edit on 9/11/2010 by Three_moons because: I saw a mistake and fixed it.




posted on Sep, 11 2010 @ 04:51 AM
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reply to post by Three_moons
 

You sure are spending an extraordinary amount of time and effort trying to convince anyone who'll listen that a small meteorite couldn't be responsible for damage that's greater than a residential-area natural gas explosion. Why is that?

In addition to everything else I've documented in this thread, I guess you missed this:


Asteroid Double Whammy Near Earth Wednesday
September 7, 2010

Two small asteroids will come within moon distance of Earth Wednesday.

The first, asteroid 2010 RX30, will come within 154,100 miles of Earth — about 60 percent of the Earth-moon distance — at 5:51 a.m. EDT (1251 UT). This asteroid is estimated to be about 42 feet across.

The second, 2010 RF12, will come almost 12 hours later, at 5:12 p.m. EDT (0012 UT Thursday). It will swing by Earth at just 20 percent the Earth-moon distance, or 47,845 miles. 2010 RF12 is even smaller, only about 23 feet across.

Both were just discovered Sept. 5 by astronomer Andrea Boattini, working with a 1.5-meter reflecting telescope at Mount Lemmon in Arizona as part of the Catalina Sky Survey’s routine scanning of the skies.

According to NASA’s Near-Earth Object impact risk tables, the odds that 2010 RF12 will hit the Earth are about 1 in 50, and the odds of an impact with 2010 RX30 are less than 1 in 1,000. Both objects are too small to do much damage even if they were to smack into the Earth: Much of their rocky mass probably wouldn’t survive the trip through Earth’s atmosphere.

www.wired.com...

Looks like some of their rocky mass survived the trip through Earth's atmosphere.

Relax Three Moons, stories like this will become increasingly common. But I suspect you already know that.



posted on Sep, 11 2010 @ 06:05 AM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


The two asteroids that passed close by earth recently did just that, pass by, they didn't enter the atmosphere.

Then you got the screen shots Azzlin provided, so to answer your question, yes an underground explosion would leave a crater like that.

So, no it was not a meteorite.

Oh and I see what you're trying to imply in your reply to Three Moons, it must be a sad, pathetic world one must live in when one believes that everyone who thinks differently to them, is doing it for some nefarious reason.





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