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NC Sheriff's Want Access to Prescription Drug Database

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posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 09:19 AM
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Story

A group of Sheriff's in North Carolina want access to a prescription drug database so they can find out who are on pain medication, benzodiazapenes, and other narcotics.

I guess personal/medical privacy has not taken a backseat to the War on Drugs in North Carolina. Luckily, only 20% of doctors and 10% of pharmacies in the state currently use the system. Although, if the police get their way it will probably be legislated that all doctors and pharmacies will have to start using the system.




posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 09:32 AM
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Great. Let's give the cops info on everyone's medical conditions! But first the police should let us know what drugs they're on and we should test them of course. Just need to check for things like steroids, viagra and Rogaine lol.

Our medical records are already available to Homeland Scrutiny since the Patriot ( totalitarian rule) Act was passed. This just brings it down to the state and local level.

Naturally, this would affect mostly people with severe injuries and chronic pain, cancer patients and accident victims. Yeah, they're all criminals.


North Carolina, this does NO credit to the state.



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


Youre right. If this is enacted, basically everyone who gets prescribed a narcotic, legitmately or not, can now at least count on the police looking into their private affairs.



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 03:40 PM
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This is a tough issue, as there is more at stake than just personal privacy. The person at the end nailed it on the head, as to the questions he asked will need to be answered: Who has access and when would that access be required.
With all of the different drugs out there, then it leads to a lot of questions. The first question that I have, is how many people have been stopped and detained on the suspicion of using drugs, when it was a prescribed medication that they needed? And what corrections that the police took to prevent such from happening again?
Like all good ideas, there is the potential for abuse to happen, and what would be the means to prevent such from happening and the ramifications if an officer does such.
So there you have it, on one hand, it would clear up the mistakes that an officer might make in the point of a routine stop or detainment, where the suspect has legitimate cause to have what could be construed as drug paraphanilia, and the other hand, the potential for abuse and discrimination is present.



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 09:03 PM
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This seems awfully important to me. If NC gets away with this other states will follow suit if they think the waters are safe. If big Pharma decides to back this idea we're all in for real problems. The state truly wants total control of our bodies and minds, I'm sure the health bill probably already has a provision about this in there somewhere and they're giving it a test run down in the Tarheel. What do you think?



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 11:21 PM
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Originally posted by sdcigarpigSo there you have it, on one hand, it would clear up the mistakes that an officer might make in the point of a routine stop or detainment, where the suspect has legitimate cause to have what could be construed as drug paraphanilia,


Im not quite sure what you mean by this part of your reply. If a person has a prescription, by current law, they are required to have the pills in the bottle that the pills came in. Even if you are prescribed say, Methadone, you can't just carry them around and tell a cop that you have a prescription; they have to be in their prescribed container. Its much easier and safer to just follow that law than to have cops have access to your entire prescription history.

What paraphernalia are you referring to?



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


If that is the case then you are right, we are in for some serious trouble. Where will this lead to? If Big Pharma gets behind it, does access to the list eventually down a slippery road end up in the hands of employers? Will people who trying to be responsible and on Suboxone treatments or Methadone Maintenance end up losing their jobs, housing, etc? Yes, obviously that is a long shot but once you open the door, the potential to let more than you expected through becomes very real.



posted on Sep, 11 2010 @ 12:37 AM
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Since there is no test for pain i can see the cops looking at someone and claiming there pain is not real and arresting them.

With disorders like fibromyalgia and a number of neurological disorders there are few if any apparent signs that they are really in pain.
And cops are not medical doctors and can not practice medicine.

So there is a big conflict right there.



posted on Sep, 11 2010 @ 12:41 AM
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reply to post by Nikolam
 


Very highly doubt they get it.

That information is protected by Federal Law.



posted on Sep, 11 2010 @ 06:59 AM
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reply to post by Nikolam
 


How many people might lose their jobs or be prevented from getting one if they know what prescriptions you are taking? They just might not want you if you are on anti-depressants, pain meds, heart meds, aids meds, etc. It's going to happen. This is going to slip under the radar with no public debate because the MSM won't touch it. Anything the cops and employers might want in this regard they're going to get. One more step in the evolution of fascism.



posted on Sep, 11 2010 @ 07:00 AM
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