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The end of political correctness (lies)

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posted on Sep, 9 2010 @ 07:04 AM
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Originally posted by Brood
Black people aren't actually going around provoking white people about this. It is just something you and your uneducated friend have fabricated and have been arguing with me about relentlessly and brainlessly for the past day now.


If you do a google image search, then there are in fact a variety of both ''black power'' and ''white power'' t-shirts available to purchase.Presumably some people are buying these.

Even if the scenario is only hypothetical, then that doesn't alter the fact that we've had more than one poster attempting to justify this hypothetical situation.


Originally posted by Brood
Even if this scenario happened, both of them wearing the T-shirts, of course the black person's is going to be less provocative because people recognize the actual SAYING, unlike the white power shirt as it could really only see it as either an immature outburst of a failing white rebellion, or a failing attempt at white supremacy.


The phrase ''black power'' was only relevant about 30 or 40 years ago. It's redundant in 2010, and any message displaying ''black power'' or ''white power'' can only really be interpreted as inciting, intimidating, shallow, racially biased, and hinting at racial superiority..

Anyone who chooses to wear a shirt that proclaims ''pride'' in their race, is clearly attempting to wilfully segregate themselves along racial lines ( which is painfully ironic, considering the history of black people in the USA ).

The simple fact of the matter, is that if you were a white person walking down the street, and ( hypothetically ) saw four black men passing you with ''black power'' t-shirts, then it'd be as equally an intimidating, and worrying experience, as if it was a black person, who passed four white men with ''white power'' t-shirts.




posted on Sep, 9 2010 @ 07:09 AM
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edit on 9-9-2010 by fooks because: irrelevant



posted on Sep, 9 2010 @ 11:11 AM
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reply to post by Brood
 

First off I am a grown man. Second off, come to where I live and I guarantee your views will change drastically. And by the way, I am very fluent in American English. And you are the one that is misled and naive. Yes the black power issue came about for reasons that you stated but THAT WAS 40 YEARS AGO. Things take on a different meaning over time and times change. Evidently you have generation gap syndrome pretty bad or you are uneducated, so which one is it? Times have changed and the fact of the matter is is that blacks, thanks mostly in part to the PC crew, think and act now like whites did in the 60's. This is why we learn History in schools because, history repeats itself with just a little twist, and the twist here is role reversal of the races. What say you? By the way, read my first post on this thread and maybe you will get a better Idea of where I'm coming from. '
'





edit on 9-9-2010 by kimish because: edit to add



posted on Sep, 9 2010 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by Sherlock Holmes
 


If there was a group of black people walking toward me with black power T-shirts on I would not be intimidated in the least. Just because something happened 40 years ago doesn't mean the ideas are dead. There are still plenty of Nazis and, clearly, KKK followers. I never said that anti-white racism did not exist, in fact, I quite clearly state that I think it does in the post you are replying to. I'm simply saying that this analogy with the T-shirts is pretty ignorant and childish because the only reason that black power is less offensive than white power is because it is actually referring to a significant point in history, not because black people have more power than white people. Maybe you should be more true to your user name..

reply to post by kimish
 


If you had read the post you are replying to you would realize i am not disagreeing with you entirely, just that one scenario you gave as it was very misled. I agree with you on most of your points, but this analogy about the T-shirts is really just ignorant.



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 07:05 AM
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Originally posted by Brood
If there was a group of black people walking toward me with black power T-shirts on I would not be intimidated in the least.


Then, we are getting into the realms of personal perceptions.

If I saw people a group of people ( of a different race, or skin colour, to me ) walking down the street, obnoxiously displaying a t-shirt that proclaimed some kind of ''pride'' or preference for their own race, then I'd certainly feel a bit nervous, as they may see me as a potential target for their ignorant attitudes.


Originally posted by Brood Just because something happened 40 years ago doesn't mean the ideas are dead. There are still plenty of Nazis and, clearly, KKK followers.


This is not a correct analogy.

The idea of ''black power'' may not be dead, but the justification for such a belief is.

I can fully understand why black people in 1960s USA, may have endorsed such a notion, because they were legally treated as second-class citizens, purely because of their race/skin colour.

Fast-forward 40-50 years, and we ( in the West ) have full racial equality in law, so such ideas as racial ''pride'' and segregation should be consigned to the scrap-heap, where they belong.

Just because some people still promote Nazi and KKK ideals nowadays, is irrelevant, because due to legal equality, if they actually put their views in to actions then there will be legal repercussions for them, just as there will be for any Black Panther extremists.


Originally posted by Brood
I'm simply saying that this analogy with the T-shirts is pretty ignorant and childish because the only reason that black power is less offensive than white power is because it is actually referring to a significant point in history, not because black people have more power than white people.


It's only less offensive to you, because you are trying to justify double-standards to yourself.

It's 2010, not 1968.

''Black power'' and ''White power'' slogans have no place in any racially equal society, because the people displaying the message are wilfully trying to instigate racial segregation and racially divisive beliefs and attitudes.


So what, if it's a significant point in history ? What relevance has that got nowadays ?


Originally posted by Brood
but this analogy about the T-shirts is really just ignorant.


Again, it's in the ''eye of the beholder'' and individual perceptions make you post this remark.

There's no ignorance involved in holding the view that everybody should be treated equally ( as they are by law ), and that no double-standards should take place in a modern-day society that is based on equality and the ''Golden Rule''.



posted on Sep, 10 2010 @ 08:44 AM
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no double-standards should take place in a modern-day society that is based on equality and the ''Golden Rule''


It's funny you should bring up the Golden Rule, because If I were a black person, I would not want people to talk about me and develop opinions on me regardless of an actual black person's input. So until that person comes, this is at a deadlock. It's really just two people bouncing ideas off of eachother with no concrete knowledge of whats actually going on here. The Golden Rule is telling me to shut up and wait for a more educated opinions to elaborate on one or more of the sides of this argument before we continue.



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