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Questions on Shortwave Frequencies etc etc

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posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 12:44 PM
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Questions on shortwaves etc ... for anyone who knows and can answer ..

1 - Is there a master list of shortwave frequencies?

2 - Is it by region or is it good for everywhere?

3 - Where can it be obtained?

4 - Our old shortwave frequency book is 15-20 years old. It came with the shortwave. Is it still any good or do the frequencies change?

5 - I'm specifically interested in Emergency Management due to Hurricane Earl. Does anyone know the frequencies to listen to .. FEMA .. WEATHER ... EBS etc? Are they the same frequencies for someone in Delaware as they are in ... oh ... say ... Maine or something?

6 - I looked up frequencies with google. Got some info, but not a lot. Anyone have any tips .. frequency tips ... etc?

7 - Anyone know if Coast to Coast is on shortwave? Just wondering ...
Kinda figured it would be. It's their kind of thing.

Thanks in advance




posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 12:57 PM
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I'm running short on time, I will be back for full answer.

This is a somewhat longish response to answer all your questions.

I basically answered this way so I can find this later on my profile page.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 01:13 PM
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I'm kinda short on time too.
Hopefully you can get back to me before Hurricane Earl slams us into the twilight zone on Friday morning. Looking forward to the answers ... Thanks.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 01:18 PM
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For the most part, EMS frequencies are not shortwave since they are more localized events. A good scanner reference will have those listed on a region-by-region adn community-by-community basis. There are 'emergency nets' (like ARES) sprinkled throughout the ham bands that you can find online. Just do your search without the 'shortwave' criteria and I bet you'll find plenty.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 01:23 PM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 
go to AARL web site, or search for ham radio, there you will find what your are looking for. good listening cq cq cq dx. station 195



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 01:29 PM
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Though not always accurate I look here for program info: www.primetimeshortwave.com...

There's a nice interface here: naswa.net... Sort of like the Streaming Internet Radio Guide for shortwave.

Get a scanner for the EMS stuff.

Or go hardcore balls to the wall and HAM.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 01:51 PM
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Most of the day to day emergency stuff is in the VHF/UHF range.

FEMA has a handful of SW frequencies that they have spoken out for.

5.211
10.493
.exc...

The stuff in the



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 07:24 PM
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Originally posted by FlyersFan
Questions on shortwaves etc ... for anyone who knows and can answer ..

1 - Is there a master list of shortwave frequencies?

2 - Is it by region or is it good for everywhere?

3 - Where can it be obtained?



First and foremost, we'll deal only in broadcast voice for shortwave.

Yes, there are lists. Some much better than others. All have their own problems. Stations seem to bounce around on different frequencies so the best choice is to receive the schedule directly from the station of interest.

The station broadcast to areas of the world, but there is massive over coverage or the antennas just aren't tuned right, mis-directed, etc; you can hear many stations that you shouldn't hear if you follow their schedule and coverage area. You will quickly find out about this by listening and logging the stations.

Some of these sources can be pricey. klingenfuss ... World Radio TV Handbook ... Universal Radio

These will give you a start and idea.




4 - Our old shortwave frequency book is 15-20 years old. It came with the shortwave. Is it still any good or do the frequencies change?



Some of the stations have probably gone off the air. Stations do change frequency, some as often as twice a year for better reception. You got a collector's item now, so check Ebay and see if anyone is selling anything like it. It may be somewhat valuable to radio hobbyists.




5 - I'm specifically interested in Emergency Management due to Hurricane Earl. Does anyone know the frequencies to listen to .. FEMA .. WEATHER ... EBS etc? Are they the same frequencies for someone in Delaware as they are in ... oh ... say ... Maine or something?



Many of the agencies you listed use VHF and UHF for short distance point to point usage. This is a scanner issue and a good source for that type of info is Radio Reference





6 - I looked up frequencies with google. Got some info, but not a lot. Anyone have any tips .. frequency tips ... etc?



Much of what you find is old or misleading. I don't know why guy go to the extreme to making huge lists, many times just making up information of frequencies and stations. This is why I prefer published information from established companies.




7 - Anyone know if Coast to Coast is on shortwave? Just wondering ...
Kinda figured it would be. It's their kind of thing.



Now it's interesting. The coast guard actually broadcast more digital information than voice information. Here are links for USCG voice. But here is some of the weather fax charts that are broadcast out of Boston for the middle and northern Atlanic. Here are the weather faxes from New Orleans that show the Caribbean and middle Atlantic.

There is also Station WLO (Mobile Alabama) and KLB (Seattle Washington area) that broadcast marine weather and other information on schedules here.

You need a decent HF radio capable of all bands, not broadcast bands, for the marine broadcasts. It is also broadcast on SSB (single Side Band) using the USB (upper side band). If you listen in AM mode, it will sound funky and hard to make out.

Now we can discuss what hams do in time like this. There will be several networks set up for emergency communication be it ships at sea or flooded towns. The hurricane network will be around 14.325 USB. It doesn't broadcast all the time, but the info it passes is important.

You'll find other State based HF networks set up in the 7150 to 7300 range and these can be either USB or LSB (lower side band). It depends on what requirements were established when radios were chosen for these networks.

Just hit the ham bands from time to time and write down the frequencies you hear people talking to one another. You'll find the active nets fairly quick.

good luck in your listening.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by hinky
Yes, there are lists. Some much better than others. All have their own problems. Stations seem to bounce around on different frequencies so the best choice is to receive the schedule directly from the station of interest.

The station broadcast to areas of the world, but there is massive over coverage or the antennas just aren't tuned right, mis-directed, etc; you can hear many stations that you shouldn't hear if you follow their schedule and coverage area. You will quickly find out about this by listening and logging the stations.

It isn’t misdirected antennas.

And experience from over 30 year of listening tells me that you shouldn’t really pay attention to the published schedules, or even intended target areas.

When a band is open between you and them, you will hear them, even if the main radiation lobe is pointed away from you.

Propagation is too erratic to set a reliable schedule by. Those intended target areas are conservative wishful think more than anything.

They just try to move up and down the SW band as the day progresses. They try to stay within an area where there is a reasonable assurance the band is open to “somewhere” and then go from there. They change bands from winter to summer, and from year to year as the solar cycle chages.


Right now, as I am posting this.
The 12Mhz band is real long, and dying off.
9.7Mhz band is in the prime, good for long long haul stuff.
DW BBC, radio china, radio japan, and the like.
The 7mhz band is a pile of hams and radio stations beating the heck out of each other.
6mhz band is pulled in close right now. Radio Havana Cuba is pounding in and other transmitters in the Americas.
5mhz band is real tight. The over comer and WYFR and other stuff in the states.

Tomorrow, 9mhz could be short and 12mhz is in the prime. Or it could be 6mhz….. or what ever. Or the whole shebang could be flat after a solar storm.

After a while of listening you will start to get the general eb and flow of the SW band.

The atmosphere doesn’t follow a schedule.

The best thing to do is set down with a good radio, with a big antenna, and see what you run across when cranking through the band. And don’t stay within the SW broadcast bands. Explore the wide open spaces in between, you often run into that hidden nugget of gold.


If the BBC schedule states that they are transmitting an English service on 5.xx right now from a mainland transmitter, I know that I would be wasting my time trying to tune it in. If I am wanting to hear stuff from that area, I should go to the 9.xx Mhz band right now. As midnight comes, I will be dropping down to the 7mhz or 6mhz band.
If you know what bands are open you don’t need a schedule to find what you are looking for.

Just go where you know there will be activity from the target area and see what you find.


[edit on 31-8-2010 by Mr Tranny]



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 10:16 PM
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I like to throw the dash in.

The targeted area is interesting. They are required to state the intended area of broadcasting. It is hit and miss on some stations but others seem to follow what they publish.

The published schedules, from stations, come into play with that being the latest info. Klingenfuss has the best scheduling, but it's outdated by a year when published, but the treasure is you can look at past frequencies. I use this much more for digital stations than voice. I couldn't tell you off the top of my head how many reference books I have for stuff like this. It's just several feet of bookcase.

Propagation is tricky, but you can hear Radio Moscow or Radio Deutschland just about any night when they are targeting North America. Now could a guy catch Radio Verdad in Guatemala while he's pumping out 50W, that one is harder. I'll concede propagation with given factors.

I correspond with CRI fairly often for their Chinese transmitters. The North American transmitters are like catching an AM station. You should check with them to see what transmitters your hitting on.

I can routinely cover about 2/3 of the planet. More importantly, I have the QSL's to cover it. Ham for over 40 years, I hate Morse code but there was a time when you had to know it.

Even my little avatar off to the side with my name "hinky" above it, is off the HF band. I've had 6 people make comments about that.

Radio is just plain fun, don't you agree?



posted on Sep, 1 2010 @ 12:09 AM
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Fun? ….. I sometime wonder if I am sane….

Spending all night listening to RTTY signals trying to figure out if they were 7 bit 8 bit, 45 baud or whatever baud…..

I would go down the band, interrogating them one by one……. Then I would look up and see a light coming through the window…… I would think…. “What’s that light outside?” Then I would look and the clock and cuss “Damn it’s already coming daylight!!!!”

Did that more than once…….

Hooking a halicrafters sx96 up to a computer to pull PSK31 is one of my weirder experiments. It works pretty good below 12mhz but on the top band setting >12mhz it gets too unstable. OK for RTTY, not for PSK31.

Um….. no, on second thought, trying to pull PSK 31 with a one tube regenerative receiver is one of my weirder experiments…….

About the only one time I have seen a “consistent” shortwave station is when I am in the ground wave coverage area. One of those is the radio japan relay in Canada.

Of course, the 300 foot wire that I use for the main SW antenna helps in the “consistency” department. I have been planning a 500 footer, or dog leg the 300 with a 200 extension. But that is future plans.

Had more than one person go, “What the heck is that stuff strung through the trees?..... that's awfully low for a power line????"

[edit on 1-9-2010 by Mr Tranny]



posted on Sep, 1 2010 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 


This website is good for most emergency agencies around your area. Gives you the frequencies to and even the trunking id numbers for more advanced radio communication systems most law enforcement are using these days. A trunking scanner is probably the best investment in you want to listen to most larger agencies. Most state and Gov and going to private communications providers that are unable to be scanned by any scanner. This website will get you started. Good scanning....

www.radioreference.com...



posted on Sep, 1 2010 @ 01:39 AM
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Right now, Radio Havana Cuba is wide as a barn door (as normal) on 5970 and 6060. I really wish someone would chip in and send them a decent pi network for their transmitter. They can't have one of mine.


The only odd thing to note is VOA evidently ticked off some jamming station on 6080. I know it’s not a Chinese jammer, they are running an African/middle east targeted program in English. The Chinese usually leave those alone.

They have been talking about Iraq/Afghanistan a bit, so It may be an Iranian jammer.
VOA and the jammer is about even in strength.



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