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Free market has turned us into 'Matrix' drones

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posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 06:15 AM
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Free market has turned us into 'Matrix' drones


www.independent.co.uk

A leading economist has likened the nation's acceptance of free-market capitalism to that of the brainwashed characters in the film The Matrix, unwitting pawns in a fake reality. In a controversial new book, the Cambridge economist Ha-Joon Chang debunks received wisdom on everything from the importance of the internet to the idea that people in the United States enjoy the highest standard of living in the world; an iconoclastic attitude that has won him fans such as Bob Geldof and Noam Chomsky.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 06:15 AM
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A very interesting article, which shows how we have been conditioned to accept that "capitalism is best" when in fact, everyone who knows anything at all about economics knows that the "drip down" theory is a fallacy at best and a control mechanism at worst.

The author spoken of does not pretend to have all the answers, but does raise more than a few pertinent points.

The 20th century was they century of the worship of money, culminating in the 80's and the Gordon Gecko "greed is good" credo, which many still follow.

If ever we are to evolve our species in a societal way, then we will at some point need to get past this rather primitive way of thinking - if we are ALLOWED to get past it.

The hereditary rich, and global elite would like nothing better than to keep the rest of the planet firmly in their places - working for them, however vicariously, and further enrich them, while the rest struggle to make ends meet.

www.independent.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 06:37 AM
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Awesome!!

May have to find this book.

Though I don't need convincing that Adam Smiths "invisible hand" doesn't exist.

star+flag



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 06:50 AM
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reply to post by ghostsoldier
 


The problem as I see it is, is that because of the conditioning aspects of capitalism it is hard to imagine any other system.

Human nature also plays a part - the attitude of "I want what he/she's got", and until we can think past that we are going nowhere fast, just endless cycles of boom and bust, as the greedy repeat mistakes of the past, and the poor suffer for them.

It's interesting that the major war of the latter half of the 20th century was an idealogical war (at least in theory) with one corrupt system attempting to conquer another corrupt system, where only the elite benefit.

Our western society has its roots in greed, and like all false ideologies will eventually topple - and when it does, it won't be pretty.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 07:37 AM
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I love his work!

Bad Samaritans for me was a real eye opener and an amazing read.

For anyone interested, his latest book is called 23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism

The best deal I found was here: www.bookdepository.com...

$21.86, free delivery worldwide.

Thanks for the heads up mate.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 07:51 AM
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Originally posted by serbsta

Thanks for the heads up mate.


No probs - I'm going to wait until the library service has this in stock, because I don't want him to become too much of a capatalist


Seriously though, the problems with our current system far outweight the benefits, and we seriously need to change how we live.

I noticed one economist trying to be sarky, and state 'I think the internet has probably changed the world more than the washing machine'

Dr Ruth Lea, Economic advisor to Arbuthnot Banking Group
source

But this is both disingenuous and dishonest, and is a statement deliberately taken out of context in order to rubbish the author.

For what was actually written, in context, the book would need to be read, but my guess is that the author is saying that labour saving devices (and other factors of course) meant that more women than ever before were able to enter the workplace, and not leave for good simply because they got married or had kids.

In this context, I think it's fair to say that labour saving devices had a huge impact on the workplace and economies as a whole.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 08:02 AM
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I see a couple of long range problem here.

1) Communism was designed to feast on the dead body of capitalism (which is why communism doesn't do so well when introduced to undeveloped nations). What will happen when we run out of capitalist states?

2) A significant portion of technical innovation originates in a capitalist market. What will replace that?

[edit on 31-8-2010 by RKWWWW]



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by RKWWWW
 





I see a couple of long range problem here.

1) Communism was designed to feast on the dead body of capitalism (which is why communism doesn't do so well when introduced to undeveloped nations). What will happen when we run out of capitalist states?


Who mentioned communism as an alternative?
Communism has never been practiced by ANY country - only forms of socialism.




2) A significant portion of technical innovation originates in a capitalist market. What will replace that?


Try to think outside the box of capitalism - this is part of the conditioning that I spoke about.

Besides which, capitalism in it's true form is not practised either, it's more keynesian economics than anything else.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 08:23 AM
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Originally posted by budski
reply to post by RKWWWW
 





I see a couple of long range problem here.

1) Communism was designed to feast on the dead body of capitalism (which is why communism doesn't do so well when introduced to undeveloped nations). What will happen when we run out of capitalist states?


Who mentioned communism as an alternative?
Communism has never been practiced by ANY country - only forms of socialism.




2) A significant portion of technical innovation originates in a capitalist market. What will replace that?


Try to think outside the box of capitalism - this is part of the conditioning that I spoke about.

Besides which, capitalism in it's true form is not practised either, it's more keynesian economics than anything else.



Wouldn't a mixed economy be the best of both world's? Maybe that's what you are talking about.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by RKWWWW
 


I don't think so - simply because the greed factor would never go away.

In a way, many European countries follow a model that is a mixture of socialism and capitalism (in theory at least) but it hasn't worked out too well so far...



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 08:47 AM
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Originally posted by budski
reply to post by RKWWWW
 


I don't think so - simply because the greed factor would never go away.

In a way, many European countries follow a model that is a mixture of socialism and capitalism (in theory at least) but it hasn't worked out too well so far...




All economic systems have greed. In some, lust for material things is replaced by the compulsion to rule others. Money=Power. Power=Money.

I think Chang is making some interesting observations of capitalism, but it's done in an vacuum. No alternatives are offered and no comparisons made. All economic systems condition those who operate within.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 08:54 AM
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Originally posted by RKWWWW



All economic systems have greed. In some, lust for material things is replaced by the compulsion to rule others. Money=Power. Power=Money.

I think Chang is making some interesting observations of capitalism, but it's done in an vacuum. No alternatives are offered and no comparisons made. All economic systems condition those who operate within.



Ever watch star trek?
Not all economic models have greed or power as their core motivators.

Communism doesn't - one of the basic tenets is "let each work according to his ability and earn according to his needs"

Of course, communism could never work while humans insist on working for personal gain in whatever form that might take.

The old socialist models pretty much proved that.

As a society, until we learn to work together, we are doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past over and over again, while those who benefit most from our labours and spending habits continue to laugh at us, and rake in yet more money.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 09:28 AM
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Originally posted by budski

Originally posted by RKWWWW



All economic systems have greed. In some, lust for material things is replaced by the compulsion to rule others. Money=Power. Power=Money.

I think Chang is making some interesting observations of capitalism, but it's done in an vacuum. No alternatives are offered and no comparisons made. All economic systems condition those who operate within.



Ever watch star trek?
Not all economic models have greed or power as their core motivators.

Communism doesn't - one of the basic tenets is "let each work according to his ability and earn according to his needs"

Of course, communism could never work while humans insist on working for personal gain in whatever form that might take.

The old socialist models pretty much proved that.

As a society, until we learn to work together, we are doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past over and over again, while those who benefit most from our labours and spending habits continue to laugh at us, and rake in yet more money.


Can you think of any examples of an economic system without some form of greed other than one from a science fiction TV show?

[edit on 31-8-2010 by RKWWWW]



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by RKWWWW
 


I named one - communism.

Communism has never been practiced, and its core tenets have nothing to do with greed or power, rather each person contributes to society as best they can.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 09:41 AM
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Originally posted by budski
reply to post by RKWWWW
 


I named one - communism.

Communism has never been practiced, and its core tenets have nothing to do with greed or power, rather each person contributes to society as best they can.



Sorry. I meant, can you give an example of an economic system without some form of greed other than a sci-fi TV show or one that exists only in theory?



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by RKWWWW
 


All economic systems exist only in theory, including capitalism as it was meant to be practiced.

We have seen that the capitalist/keynesian model doesn't work and we have seen that a socialist model as a pre-requisite for a communist state does not work, because of the complexities of human nature as it exists now.

The major difference is that the capitalist/keynesian model allows the illusion of wealth within reach of all, when in reality it is out of reach, but people are still encouraged to chase it, thereby encouraging them to work harder for their ultimate paymasters, who marx/engels would have called the Bourgeois, and placing even greater wealth and power in the hands of the few, which then becomes self perpetuating.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 10:10 AM
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I don't really want to be rich. I just want enough to be healthy and be able to travel a bit and pursue a few hobbies. A mixed economy, either leaning towards capitalism or socialism, works well for me.

Since neither true capitalism nor true communism has ever existed, I think it can quickly become pointless (and illogical) to dwell on their good or bad points.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 10:13 AM
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reply to post by RKWWWW
 


The model of keynesian capitalism that has been followed has progressed exactly as predicted ny Marx/Engels, and is no better than lords and serfs.

If all people want is "to get by" then a fair system will never be on the cards.

Just more of the same.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by budski
reply to post by RKWWWW
 


The model of keynesian capitalism that has been followed has progressed exactly as predicted ny Marx/Engels, and is no better than lords and serfs.

If all people want is "to get by" then a fair system will never be on the cards.

Just more of the same.



So why doesn't communism work? Why has communism been the favorite system for despots and evil regimes to high-jack?

[edit on 31-8-2010 by RKWWWW]



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by RKWWWW
 


It hasn't - as I have repeatedly stated, communism has never been tried, just various forms of socialism.

It's also quite wrong to blame the system because certain people have manipulated it for their own ends - much like capitalism, except capitalism has probably been the cause of more suffering than any form of socialism.




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