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Hurricane Earl. Southern people advice please for those not used to hurricanes.

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posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 04:39 PM
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I went through one in the early 70's and it was something we were not ready for. For those that may be hit by Earl, what can people do to prepare for a hurricane? I recall filling up all the water receptacles, including tubs and sinks. Extra batteries.

Anything else that you can share? Please do so.

Edit: I would think a manual can opener and a Coleman stove would be prudent.

[edit on 30-8-2010 by intrepid]




posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 04:48 PM
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Lots of canned foods. Lots of water. Matches, lighter, wood stock pile, boat, safe shelter for during, spray paint, plenty of clothes kept in dry place, soap, hammocks, toilet paper, machette, sharp knives, a gun in case of looters.

MOTF!


Edit: Good luck to you, and i hope all will be fine.

[edit on 30-8-2010 by MessOnTheFED!]

[edit on 30-8-2010 by MessOnTheFED!]



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


Prepare for a week or two of power outages, little travel, and store closures. If you have candles, food, water, toilet paper, clean socks and underwear, feminine hygiene products, any medications that are essential, make sure it will last 2 weeks, then you are probably ok. Go get the propane tanks filled for the bbq grill, that way you can cook. Grab a couple of 5 gallon containers of drinking water. Make sure you have a can opener that doesn't use electricity. Fill up the gas tanks in the cars, although the roads may be closed, it might be a nice place to cool off, or even sleep.

I doubt if Earl causes any major disruption, but everyone should have basic preparations to survive two weeks in case of any natural or man-made disaster. It may not be a hurricane, it could be anything unexpected. The basic requirements listed above will make it a lot less troublesome.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 04:57 PM
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This is the link that FEMA directs you to about Hurricane Planning and how to prepare:

Step 1: Get A Kit / "To-Go Bag" Get an Emergency Supply Kit, which includes items like non-perishable food, water, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra flashlights and batteries. You may want to prepare a portable kit and keep it in your car. This kit should include:......

www.ready.gov...





[edit on 30-8-2010 by lasertaglover]



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 04:57 PM
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Some things I'm thinking about along the way. A well stocked first aid kit.

Is there a cell phone charger that works off of batteries?



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 04:57 PM
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A non cordless phone. This is something people never think about but believe me they come in handy when cell phones or electric powered phones don't work.

A radio is always good, CVS or Walgreens will more than likely have a little hurricane section on an end cap with these. They usually do every year and these radios are about 15 bucks and they are the crank kind, no batteries or power needed.

Wood if it's strong enough and you want to board up windows otherwise duct tape in "X" form from one corner to the other works. It will just keep the glass from shattering if something were to hit it.

Candles, lots of candles and matches as well as a lighter incase the matches get wet.

Canned foods and water. We use to fill the sinks and tubs with water depending on how severe the hurricane was.

If you live in low areas get sand bags. If they are needed it will more than likely be on the news where to get them. It's usually the local fire station or you can make your own.

I would suggest moving your car out from under trees. If you can park it up against your home. I did this a few times and it kept it from getting wet inside. It will still get wet with windows up...the wind gets it.

Board games!! When there is no power it gets boring. Playing cards or monopoly
those can go on forever.

That is usually what I would get in a serious hurricane situation. It all depends on how prepared you want to be and if you aren't use to them it's good to be over prepared. Personally I'm use to it so it's just like a major storm to me.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 05:26 PM
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Everything above....AND a battery operated radio! After Katrina, I was so glad I had a battery radio or I would have been COMPLETELY in the dark, as I couldn't get any phone calls out on my cell phone. For several days, there was no communications, or electricity. Also a weather radio. I have been through many hurricanes, and often they bring tornadoes, along with many other things. If you do not have a radio, you will have no way to be warned of tornadoes or anything else, as power will be out.....it's very important!


[edit on 30-8-2010 by StealthyKat]



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 05:31 PM
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If your gonna get hit hard, put a huge X of heavy duty tape over your windows, to keep them from breaking...too much.

The south may get more hurricanes, but the north does get hurt.

In fact, it is a New England town that holds the record for most expensive hurricane from like 1906 or something, inflation considered.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 05:35 PM
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Oh, and if you have pets, make sure you have plenty of food and water for them too.

And in case of flooding, a place to take them.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 05:39 PM
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How you would prepare would be determined on the conditions you would expect to see.

But in general you should prepare to be with out power, food, water for about 3- 4 weeks. Start stocking up. If your house is questionable in construction i would seek shelter elseware. If the Storm is a cat 3 or better I would not ride it out I would evacuate. Make sure you take all photos, documents, and have plenty of cash as ATM's and Credit cards will not work.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by SWCCFAN
...and have plenty of cash as ATM's and Credit cards will not work.


That is something I wouldn't have thought of. I debit, credit damn near everything. Thanks.

Guys, you may see something as insignificant to you but it may be essential for the northern people that don't experience these situations often. Fill them in, you might actually save another members life.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 05:43 PM
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Above all else you need a plastic tub full of Heineken.

How come with all the "where are they now" anniversary reports over the last week nobody brought us up to date on that guy? He's the only one I'm really interested in.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by intrepid
 




I doubt if Earl causes any major disruption, but everyone should have basic preparations to survive two weeks in case of any natural or man-made disaster. It may not be a hurricane, it could be anything unexpected. The basic requirements listed above will make it a lot less troublesome.


Even if it is not Earl, this is supposed to be a pretty active hurricane season. It could be another storm, and we still have a month to go.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 06:03 PM
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along with everything else mentioned, extention cords (about 150 ft should do) You mostly have to deal with issues after a storm, and one big one is dealing with freezers and refrigerators thawing out. You might not be able to afford a generator, but your neighbor might have one. You might be able to "rent" some power from that person and keep your frig cold till the power is restored. If not, your gonna need to do it the old fashion way by getting your food in an ice chest and keeping an eye out for free ice from relief efforts. If you do see ice stations they might also have MRE (Meals, ready to eat) rations. Grab as much as they let you have because they make eating a lot more simpler.

Be careful when you are cleaning up after too, animals of all types and sizes get displaced during a storm and you just never know whats under or in a heap of debris when you move it around. (watch for nails and other sharp things as well)



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


During Katrina- I had full tank in the car + 3X 10gal tanks to go. In general you want to be able to get as far 800 miles in slow traffic with the gas you carry if you are evacuating.

Also propane, cell phone charger for the car, food, and 30 gal of spring water (6X 5gal bottles). I didn't have a generator but I did have a battery pack (like for jumping a car with an outlet on it) and an adaptor for the car to charge my laptop and battery pack. Last but not least a loaded shot gun and a very handy pocket knife. Depending on where you are you may want to board up your windows as well. If flooding happens it will recede rapidly 1-7 days unless the situation is like NO which has many parts far below sea level.

Make sure that all your ice cube trays are full and if you have room in your freezer buy several 20lb bags to keep your food for a few days while you consume the perishables.

Or just evacuate (throw away all your food in the fridge and freezer, unplug and leave it open before you leave also turn off the main gas line and main water line)- but don't forget extra gasoline cans in the trunk just in case
As a courtesy leave any supplies/food you don't take with you to your neighbors- that will help keep looters out of your place.

I wish you luck



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 07:41 PM
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Another thing, turn off your main breaker to utility company, or pull the meter, if you have a gen, this will prevent feedback(which will blow your power back out as soon as it comes back on), this also prevents feedback from damaging your home from the idiot down the road who has the big diesel gen set, and doesn't turn off the main or pull his meter. This is also the major cause of injury to utility workers after a big storm, getting hit by feedback from gen sets.

I also fill up every container, pot, clean storage medium and bathtub with water, boiled it will be fine.
A 5 gallon bucket makes for a great portable toilet, and is easy to keep clean. prevents using the pressure in your tank if you're on a well.

I also keep plenty of charcoal, and when storm is approaching, I gather wood and bring it inside to keep it dry. I am going to eat. A large dutch oven, or heavy cast aluminum pot with an old metal reefer shelf will work great as a miniature grill( and doesn't take much charcoal).

just some helpful hints.

[edit on 30/8/2010 by Pappa_Bear]



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 07:41 PM
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Outdoors - tie down anything large such as a boat or motorcycle - put the car in the garage if you have one. Bring in all smaller items that might blow around or away- things can cause damage by hitting windows. During the storm stay away from windows - I was in a small living room once during a hurricane and the patio door window broke even tho it was taped up. In buildings with flat roofs - it can flood up there and and come down onto lower floors - this usually applies to apartment buildings or condominiums, so beware.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 07:52 PM
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Plenty of good advice here already...but, don't forget CHAIN SAWS and Gas/Oil mix and Gas to run it...plus bar oil and maybe an extra chain.

When Hurricane Fran came through in 1996, we were without power for 9 days and did not have street service/clean up for almost another week...the neighborhood cleared the streets of trees/limbs/debris. Get one now if you don't have and get familiar with it. This way you avoid the price ripoffs after the storm.

Also, save or get milk jugs and fill with water and freeze. Large blocks last longer than ice cubes, and then when melted will provide cold drinking water by the gallon.

Plus fill your tubs the night of the storm and washing machine...not to drink but to fill your toilet flush tank so you can flush after solid waste.

A stove top perculator coffee pot...the old kind that brew on the fire/stove top.... the lights might be out, but a hot cup of Joe makes it all better.

Tarps...big, heavy duty tarps...and rope, bungee chords, duct tape. To plug holes in the event of damage to your roof....

Also, inventory your possessions and take pictures as proof and store in a safe place...for insurance purposes.

I've been through plenty of hurricanes...Hugo, Fran, Floyd, Isabella, and countless smaller ones.... use common sense and trust your gut and you will be fine.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 08:07 PM
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Hi! When hurricane Fran hit Ricmond, VA in 1997, I was in Indiana.
When I got back 6 trees had blew over in the front yard. None of them hit the house fortunately, six wheel barrow loads of tree debris were in the yard and driveway. The electricity had been off three or four days, so all the food in the refrigerator and freezer was ruined. The ice maker's
ice had melted leaving a huge puddle in the freezer and the pan under the refrigerator. The worst part was that the well had collapsed in on the well pump 400 feet down. We had to have another well dug. No water for a month. No baths for a month. We bought new garbage barrels and put them in theback of the truck, we filled them at the neighbors, and drove them home. We then pumped water into the house with a submersible pump. I could wash dishes, and flush the down stairs toilet. We put drinking water in empty bleach bottles and soda liter bottles. It was tough. I took a shower using my neighbors out side garden hose, I don't know why we never asked to use someone's shower. My neighbor's pool liner got ripped up. I was so glad I was in Indiana house hunting with my little baby, I would have hated to have been there all by my self sitting in the coat closet for hours and hours. When the trees started falling over I am sure I would have been terrified. This was 60-100 miles inland from the ocean too.
Get library books to help pass the time during the storm, charge up game boys and DS machines for kids. Buy candy for rewards, pop up popcorn ahead of time, fill your bathtubs up for sponge baths and flushing the toliets, buy bleach, wash all your underwear up in case you need to wear them with no washing machine working. Freeze up ice for your coolers in metal baking pans and tupperware. I even freeze ice up in liter soda bottles, when it melts you can drink it. Good luck to everyone!



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 08:17 PM
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Mix saw dust in the ice it will keep amazingly.
Also watch the lows...
If they combine over eastern Canada,
as the hurricane comes up Friday / Saturday they may suck it inland a little further than expected.

Water, food, shelter, people you care about, entertainment.



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