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English Grammar Reference

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posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 08:14 AM
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For the past three years I've been teaching English as a foreign language and it's been a hoot. That was also my absence from ATS/BTS. It seems I've become something of a grammar Nazi in that time, so how about I put it to good use now that I'm back?

Does anyone have any nagging grammar questions or should I create individual lessons?




posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by madnessinmysoul
 


Individual lessons on commas and sentance structure is what I think this place needs...myself included.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 11:57 AM
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I, second. That!, ?:


I have constant trouble with putting commas and full stops in the appropriate places, the information just doesn't seem to go in no matter how many times I read it.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 05:25 PM
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This could be handy!

I always fall in to the your and you're, I never seem to use them correctly.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by davespanners
I, second. That!, ?:


I have constant trouble with putting commas and full stops in the appropriate places, the information just doesn't seem to go in no matter how many times I read it.


As a proofreader, I have always made comma corrections more often than anything else. The reason is that there are more rules for commas than any other form of punctuation, and those rules are more difficult to learn unless one has a reasonably strong knowledge of grammatical elements and sentence structure. Looking at it in reverse, if you always know how to use commas, then you're pretty sure also to have some all-round grammatical expertise.

For punctuation reference, I'd recommend this fun, user-friendly book: The Well-Tempered Sentence.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 11:17 PM
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Thank you for the recommendation, my girlfriend acts as my proofreader at the moment but she also gets it wrong sometimes although nowhere near as much as me.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 06:31 AM
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Iffin yous gunna bee so kynd as ta lern us dat der goot engwish, weed bee sooooooooooooooooooooooo appreciative!

Commas and semicolons are on my request list. Thank you.



posted on Sep, 6 2010 @ 08:08 AM
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Since I'm a bit short on time lately, I'll just put a quick reference for your and you're

Your is the possessive second person adjective. For those of you who don't get language jargon, it's the way that you tell people that something is theirs directly. You tell someone else "This is your food." or ask them "Is this your food?"

You're means "You are"
Use it when you're talking about someone's state of being. Do you just encounter a person that's really tall? You could tell them "Wow, you're tall!"

Next lesson will be commas and semicolons, but I don't really have the time to go over that now.



posted on Sep, 6 2010 @ 10:37 AM
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Actually, another quick one on "Their, There, and They're"

Their: The third person plural possessive form. Multiple people own it and you aren't talking directly to it.
Example:
"That's their house!"

There: A place that isn't where you are right now
Example:
"That's a nice place, I've eaten there before"

They're: "They are", a state of being for a group of people you are not directly talking to.
Example:
"They're nice people."



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