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Drought in Russia Ripples Beyond the Wheat Fields

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posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 08:17 PM
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Drought in Russia Ripples Beyond the Wheat Fields


www.nytimes.com

Early reports from Russia’s harvest indicate that yields of wheat and barley are down sharply...

Russia..may import wheat for the first time in a decade. Last year it was the world’s third-largest wheat exporter, behind the United States and Canada.

Expressing anger..Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin said Friday, “Someone is simply cashing in on the circumstances.”

The drought “has been a watershed event for the industry,” [said Black Earth Farming CFO] Michael Schneyderman...
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 08:17 PM
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The world has not yet even begun to digest the consequences of the biggest one-month leap in wheat prices in 37 years, which occurred last month. The impacts will be felt around the world, as wheat is a fungible (and indispensable) commodity.



In the developed nations, look to see rising food prices and increased economic pain, even as people feel the squeeze from other forms of economic gloom. If people are deflecting more of their meagre paychecks and credit lines to necessities like food, the prospects for a consumer-led economic revival grow dimmer.

In the developing world, the consequences will be far more dire. Those who remember the food spike in 2008 might recall riots, profound socio-political instabilities, widespread hoarding, and even starvation from Sub-Saharan Africa, Egypt, and the Middle East to Latin America and Southeast Asia.

Such factors have the potential to cause massive destabilization on a global level. Possible flaspoints include sensitive and unstable locales such as Pakisan (still reeling from devistating floods), the Middle East, and North Korea. Things are tense enough in such areas; toss in food riots and possible famine, and all bets are off.

Meanwhile, as the article states, a number of wealthy speculators and others have reaped huge financial rewards from the runup. This has led to finger-pointing and sharp words by Putin. As other governments seek to deflect blame, finger-pointing at the financial players will continue, also exacerbating political instability. and possibly rocky tensions between nations.

Choppy waters. Hang on.



www.nytimes.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 8/27/10 by silent thunder]



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 08:22 PM
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What's the signs for the end of our society? Conquer, Famine, War, Death. Where can we not see these signs in our modern world?



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 08:56 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


there is a wave of crop failures to come this year and with the gulf out and pakistan china serverly flooded russia in trouble and potential falling dollar purchacing power
were in for the perfect strom

xploder



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by XPLodER
reply to post by silent thunder
 


there is a wave of crop failures to come this year and with the gulf out and pakistan china serverly flooded russia in trouble and potential falling dollar purchacing power
were in for the perfect strom

xploder


You are soooo right, and the long hard winter is coming!



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 



S&F.

XPLodER -


It's gonna hurt...

Maybe check this one out for an 'on-the-street' view, Early Winter Coming? ...and Food Shortages?



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:30 PM
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Don't forget our woes here in Canada...

Manitoba Crops Getting Washed Out

I was watching a report this week showing Manitoba farmers standing in the lakes that should have been endless seas of wheat.

Not a good sign considering the time of year.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:33 PM
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you know what is really anoying is if there is a collaps in the us it will most likly happen in jan or feb as they are the two most economically troubled months to begin with even during good times they are slow months.
I keep holding my breath every winter hoping this wont be the one.
the real question is when will it happen (not if it will).
no form of government nore civilization has lasted more then 800 or 900 years . and when the major players collapse so does every one else leading to dark ages taht can last a 100 years or a 1000.
the Greeks the Romans the Egyptians heck even china has risen and fallen many times . each rebirth is just a new form of government.
the china of today is a totaly different place then the china of 1940.
just look what happened to them in ww2 .
I am afraid our civilizations time is at hand and a new dark age has ALREADY started the body of the world is already dead its just the nerves recation that makes the body so it doesn't know it yet .
you can see it all around you people one edge around the world the smallest thing setting them off crime going through the roof .
the haves and have nots coming to blows .
Well I have 3 boys all i can hope is ONE lives to reproduce I want my line to survive even if i dont.
meen wile ill keep hoping it never happens and things will get better if not for me then my sons.
but it is getting harder to lie to my self every day .



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by Dimitri Dzengalshlevi
 


We can look to Haiti where the United States showed great humanity by helping those people, how about Pakistan, where again the United States showed compassion and support (for a nation per wikileaks that supported terrorist acts against the United States). So yes, there is great calamity around us, but there is also a spark of hope, a spark of humanity.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by xxcalbier
 


Maybe if you had spell check your life would be better, maybe if your grammar were better, you would have a better job, maybe.....



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 11:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by silent thunder
The world has not yet even begun to digest the consequences of the biggest one-month leap in wheat prices in 37 years, which occurred last month. The impacts will be felt around the world, as wheat is a fungible (and indispensable) commodity.



In the developed nations, look to see rising food prices and increased economic pain, even as people feel the squeeze from other forms of economic gloom. If people are deflecting more of their meagre paychecks and credit lines to necessities like food, the prospects for a consumer-led economic revival grow dimmer.

In the developing world, the consequences will be far more dire. Those who remember the food spike in 2008 might recall riots, profound socio-political instabilities, widespread hoarding, and even starvation from Sub-Saharan Africa, Egypt, and the Middle East to Latin America and Southeast Asia.

Such factors have the potential to cause massive destabilization on a global level. Possible flaspoints include sensitive and unstable locales such as Pakisan (still reeling from devistating floods), the Middle East, and North Korea. Things are tense enough in such areas; toss in food riots and possible famine, and all bets are off.

Meanwhile, as the article states, a number of wealthy speculators and others have reaped huge financial rewards from the runup. This has led to finger-pointing and sharp words by Putin. As other governments seek to deflect blame, finger-pointing at the financial players will continue, also exacerbating political instability. and possibly rocky tensions between nations.

Choppy waters. Hang on.



www.nytimes.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 8/27/10 by silent thunder]


I don't think it's that dire and I've seen spikes like that in Futures Trading. Russia will feel the effects of this drought in higher prices for flour and bread, but it's not world wide.

If Russia experiences a drought next year, it could be dire.



posted on Aug, 28 2010 @ 12:13 AM
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I don't know it might end up being pretty bad.

I inadvertently had Robigus curse the wheat crop this year after being tricked into it, right here on ATS the greatest site on the Internet!

Sorry world I promise to be more careful next time.



posted on Aug, 28 2010 @ 02:07 AM
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Originally posted by Onboard2

I don't think it's that dire and I've seen spikes like that in Futures Trading. Russia will feel the effects of this drought in higher prices for flour and bread, but it's not world wide.

If Russia experiences a drought next year, it could be dire.


It will extend beyond Russia. Russia suddenly going from third-largest exporter to importer is an enormous blow.

As noted above, wheat prices are fungable which means the entire global commodities market is impacted by supply-demand issues like bad harvests within major exporting nations such as Russia.

I have vivid and unpleasant personal memories of seeing food instabiliy firsthand in 2008 in several third-world nations. The leap now in prices is greater and more vicious. There will be ugly impacts. If you live in the developed world it may be a matter of grumbling a little at the supermarket cash-register. The US is not likely to suffer too much in this regard as it will have a hefty surplus. But for the rest of the world it could be very destabilizing indeed. And, depending on where the flareups occur, they could impact geopolitical balances.



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