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River runs red in The Rockies

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posted on Aug, 26 2010 @ 06:57 PM
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These pictures were taken at the Cameron Falls, Alberta, Canada:

www.dailymail.co.uk...






The phenomenom was caused by the high levels of rain washing a red coloured sediment called argolite from the rocks and into the water.


There are a couple more pictures in the article.

This is such a rare thing to see and so very beautiful.

To see how rare it is, I did a search to see if I could find anything that would compare with it and could only come up with the Red River in Texas/Oklahoma:





[edit on 26-8-2010 by berenike]




posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 01:00 AM
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reply to post by berenike
 

I have to say those photos look fake, look at the clear pictures of the rocks then look at the water.
Never saw this in nature myself, but hey i am the messed up one. My pictures usually turn out that everything looks the same in dimensions ect ect, but that is just my own opionion,,, i am just sayin!



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 01:03 AM
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oh yes i would like to mention that i was born in Alberta, Canada and have visted the mountains many times.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 01:08 AM
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here is a web shot or close to, same view differnent color
www.google.ca...://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/01/50/6a/18/cameron-falls.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.tripadvisor.com/L ocationPhotos-g184841-w2-Waterton_Lakes_National_Park_Alberta.html&usg=__-hSWJJu61dcJ22ysJC4WeSI_968=&h=412&w=550&sz=55&hl=en&start=31&zoom=1&tbnid=Qd Xo__TflHvIjM:&tbnh=123&tbnw=152&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dcameron%2Bfalls%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DX%26rls%3Dcom.microsoft:en-ca:IE-Address%26rlz%3D1I7ADBS_ en%26biw%3D1419%26bih%3D699%26tbs%3Disch:10%2C461&um=1&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=437&vpy=410&dur=140&hovh=194&hovw=259&tx=106&ty=219&ei=dVV3TJ2MPIHGnAfIpqWUC w&oei=bFV3TKKSNeSynAfD2fGcCw&esq=2&page=2&ndsp=31&ved=1t:429,r:17,s:31&biw=1419&bih=699

if it dont work i apolgize in advance, its my first post with a link.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 01:17 AM
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Looks like someone spilled about 150 barrels of dry coolaid mix in the river lol

Nice find



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 01:39 AM
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reply to post by lightmere
 


I agree. Those pictures just don't look right. Not to mention the dailymail appears to be the only source.

news.google.com...



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 01:48 AM
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I must agree, it appears the water has been photshopped.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 03:17 AM
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Originally posted by berenike



The phenomenom was caused by the high levels of rain washing a red coloured sediment called argolite from the rocks and into the water.





[edit on 26-8-2010 by berenike]


What is argolite? I've never heard of it. I am aware of argillite, but that is 'grey'.




posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 06:02 AM
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The story was reported in the National Geographic in April 2010, but I can't find a link to National Geographic itself. A copy of a the article is reproduced in this blog:

fleavitt.blogspot.com...

Also, there is this article in The Weather Network from July 2009, with a similar picture taken by another photographer at Pincher Creek, Cameron Falls:

www.theweathernetwork.com...




I have read all of the comments left by readers of the Daily Mail article - some of them rather bad tempered. I am inclined to believe the people who say these pictures are possible due to the shutter speed of the camera, but I'm not a photographer or a photo-shopper.

I cannot comment on 'argolite' but I do understand that sediment can temporarily affect the colour or appearance of water.

I notice that the National Geographic article said the photos were taken 'last year'. I don't know for sure, but this could put them in the same time frame as that published on the Weather Network site.

[edit on 27-8-2010 by berenike]



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 06:24 AM
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Originally posted by minute2midnight
reply to post by lightmere
 


I agree. Those pictures just don't look right. Not to mention the dailymail appears to be the only source.


There's nothing wong about the pictures. They are very real.

Events like these happen quite often, depending on where you are of course. Over here we get lots of red and other coloured water bodies mfrom algal blooms



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 08:16 AM
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reply to post by OzWeatherman
 


Well I am still not convinced they are not fake. But I am not going to start an argument about it.
Its just to me the photos dont look like running water, the way it looks in nature.
I am going to research it a bit more. The photo that berenike put up looks a lot more real.
Have a great day!



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 08:21 AM
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I've seen definitely genuine pictures of similar quality in the past; it's definitely to do with the quality of the camera. I'm sure that if you had professional cameras with mad shutterspeed, your photos would look this bizarrely life-like to the point where they look fake too


This kind of phenomenon happens in a lot of places; there was just recently a thread about a river which for a couple months (or was it weeks?) every year grows algae of every single color. A different phenomenon, but there are dozens of ways that rivers can change colors. It just makes this kind of thing all that much more beautiful



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 08:26 AM
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If you go to Zion national Park in Utah, you will see a similar color in its main river. Zion is surrounded by red rock (sand stone) and make most of the river red in color almost year round.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 08:40 AM
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The misty appearance of the water is just down to the shutter speed.

Waterfall

Waterfall 2

River

The colour from the sediment happens in rivers all the time, people see it all the time even though they don't pay attention until it looks different, we have all seen a river that runs brown?

Its the same, we are just so used to brown, when the surrounding area has different coloured soil then you get the red effect, the Little Colorado river in AZ runs red as do a lot of rivers in Arizona, or parts of Utah, even Yellow when you go deeper into Colorado.
the slow shutter speed catches all the detail, remember the water is running, so the camera catches all the mist when the water flows, something we cant do with our eyes, we see the moment.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:07 AM
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The events that are happening now surely can't be ignored, these are told in the bible yet people still choose to ignore?
What will it take for all to open their eyes.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:14 AM
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Originally posted by lightmere
reply to post by berenike
 

I have to say those photos look fake, look at the clear pictures of the rocks then look at the water.
Never saw this in nature myself, but hey i am the messed up one. My pictures usually turn out that everything looks the same in dimensions ect ect, but that is just my own opionion,,, i am just sayin!




They are not fake, I have personally seen many rivers run red. They do look more intense in these photos than in person, and I am not sure why as I am not a photographer, but I do know from personal experience, that yes, rivers can run red like this.

It is very beautiful.

When I was a teenager, my family and I traveled to Tx. and we visited the red river. It had just rained that weekend, and the river was very intensely red. We swam in it, and our clothing also turned a red.


Originally posted by jazz10
The events that are happening now surely can't be ignored, these are told in the bible yet people still choose to ignore?
What will it take for all to open their eyes.


Huh?






These rivers have been doing this for a very long time. My personal experience with it was over 20 years ago. So how does that fit in with your "happening now" theory?
It has to do with the type of rocks and sediment around the areas and not some kind of magic from the sky.

Harm None
Peace



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 04:04 PM
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I realise this can happen and can be due to algal blooms or sediment loads etc, but I can't for the life of me find anything about argolite in a geologic sense.

www.google.co.nz... &q=argolite&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8




[edit on 27-8-2010 by aorAki]



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by aorAki
 


Neither could I, but I looked up the Argillite you mentioned. I found this which has a picture of orange and turquoise argillite:

en.wikipedia.org...

My best shot is to suggest that 'argolite' is a typo or mis-spelling. Or someone just used the wrong word.

The argillite in the picture was not found anywhere near Cameron Falls but it's unclear from the article how common this is around the world.

[edit on 27-8-2010 by berenike]



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 06:50 PM
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Originally posted by berenike
reply to post by aorAki
 


Neither could I, but I looked up the Argillite you mentioned. I found this which has a picture of orange and turquoise argillite:

en.wikipedia.org...

My best shot is to suggest that 'argolite' is a typo or mis-spelling. Or someone just used the wrong word.



Yeah true...nice one...remiss of me not to look up 'argillite' as well.




posted on Aug, 28 2010 @ 06:54 AM
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I am not trying to debunk your post at all

in artartica there is something similar
www.mentalfloss.com...
second picture in the article

and a video about it






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