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Request: map of the visible stars that have planets around them

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posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 11:14 AM
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For how much talk there is about exoplanets, there isn't much tangible evidence that you and I can see or at least imagine. For all of the thousands of stars we can see at night with the naked eye, surely some of them have plantes around them right?

Well it would be really neat to actually know which visible stars we have found planets around and start building a map, or add these types of things into Google Earth or Stellarium. I know that I have seen 2 stars with my naked eye that I have looked up in the exoplanet chart, one of them was Fomalhaut I believe, and even though I couldn't see any planets of course, it was really cool to know that there are planets around a star that I can see with my naked eye.

So is there nothing like this because there's only a couple visible stars that we have found planets around so far, is there too many too keep up, are they all "unconfirmed" and are just in the beginning stage so making a map would be jumping the gun? You would think something would have appeared online by now for all of us to feel like we really are making huge discoveries that are right in our neighborhood (well a couple million light years maybe).

Anyways, if nothing exists I say let's start forming a list of stars that can be seen with the naked eye or binos that have planets around them.

Fomalhaut b




posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 12:37 PM
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Im pretty sure they are logged as discovered in Google sky, but you must remember the scale that your talking about. if the earth is a grain of sand on the coast of North Carolina, our nearest exoplantiod neighbor systems could be represented as a basketball in California. its actual planets would also be about the size of a grain of sand.

I suppose you could make a 3D cube in which plots are established within the cube showing where galaxies are, but it would have to be a REALLY big cube and the plots would be on a sub-atomic scale. 99 times out of a hundred, they dont even SEE the planets, they just see the star wobbles and they use math and physics to ascertain what planet types are probably around the parent star



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 07:43 PM
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It would be nice to see a list, there has to be one somewhere.

Before bed last night I used Stellarium to look up Fomalhaut & there is was, right next to the moon in the western sky. Obviously we cant see the planets, but it is cool knowing that star in my telescope might be home to life.

Anyone know if there are 'add-ons' for Stellarium ? For a free program it is amazing & I appreciate it is free, but a search for the ISS comes up empty. It would be nice if there was an update to the databases.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 02:14 AM
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reply to post by salsaking
 


Most exoplanets have been found around stars too distant or dim to to seen with the naked eye (although of course most stars in the galaxy are too distant or dim to be seen with the naked eye). Here are a few more naked eye stars with exoplanets (there may be others I'm not an expert here):
Epsilon Eridani (closest known exoplanet)
Upsilon Andromedae
Beta Pictoris

See this page at Wikipedia.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 02:18 AM
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Here a few I think I found with my telescope. Not sure if entirely accurate.

Arcturas
Andromeda
Ursa Major
Betelguese



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:59 AM
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Originally posted by 12.21.12
Here a few I think I found with my telescope. Not sure if entirely accurate.

Arcturas
Andromeda
Ursa Major
Betelguese


Well I dont think this is right, you've got two constellations and two stars with no exoplanets unless I'm missing something.


jra

posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 10:34 AM
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posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 11:51 AM
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Originally posted by jra
reply to post by salsaking
 


Well I don't know of any maps, but there are plenty of lists.

The Planetary Society: Exoplanet catalog


This one seems to have the best interface. IRT the OP, clicking on the planet name brings-up characteristics of the star, including coordinates (R.A & Dec.), distance, stellar type and visual brightness. Most are too faint to see with your eyes from a city, but if you know where to look, you can pick them out in a telescope or binoculars.



posted on Aug, 28 2010 @ 11:20 PM
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Originally posted by VoyagerIX
reply to post by salsaking
 


Epsilon Eridani (closest known exoplanet)

This star might have planet Iarga orbiting around it:
rune.galactic.to...



posted on Aug, 29 2010 @ 10:17 AM
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The astro program Celestia knows about some exoplanets, and allows you to 'navigate' to them!

Harry.



posted on Aug, 29 2010 @ 12:45 PM
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OP --

I think I found something that may be what you were looking for:
3D Galaxy Map

I'm not sure how often it is updated with new discoveries, but it seems interesting nevertheless

It's an interactive website, and it takes a bit of clicking around to get to the information you are inquiring about.

1. First click "Launch App".
-- This takes you to the help screen that shows you the mouse controls.

2. Then click "click here to continue", which gives you a view of the whole galaxy.
-- Here, you can click certain items to view, such as "Sun location", clusters, and the names of each spiral arm.
-- There is a pane on the right that gives more information about what we are looking at.

3. On the navigation menu to the left, click the button that reads "Enter Orion Arm" (which is our arm of the galaxy).
-- When you do this, you get a weird view with a bunch of "3d Bubbles". These bubbles are areas of different structures near us.
-- If you want, you can chose a bubble from the list and adjust its opacity to see what's under it.

4. Next click the "Enter Sector" button near the top of the menu.
-- At this point, we are in sector "0,0,0", and you can see our Sun in the middle of the grid and other stars around it.
-- You can now click on a star or on the star's name from the list. More information pops up in that right-hand pane.
-- Not all of these stars have (known) planets, but some do. For example, from the list at the lower left, click on "Gl 581" -- which is Gliese 581, a star known to have planets (it's near the bottom of the list).
-- once you click on that star, click on the "Enter System" button at the top left. Clicking "enter System" on Gl 581 shows all of the known planets orbiting Gliese 581

From the sector view, you can also click the blue arrows pointing out. This will take you to other sectors, with label names using an "x,y,z axis" coordinate system -- such as sector (0,1,0), or (0,2,-1), etc.


I haven't quite explored this whole website yet, but at first glance it looks pretty cool.

I hope this helps.



[edit on 8/29/2010 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Aug, 29 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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Wow - that's rather good. It needs de-cluttering a bit, but it may be that the Java won't run fast enough on some machines if it had more detail.

Nice find!



posted on Aug, 29 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by Darkstar2
 

Thanks -- by the way, I noticed you can view it with only stars that have planets, like the OP asked...

...but I wished I could zoom out and see all of the sectors and stars (with planets) near us together in one graphic.



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 12:36 AM
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reply to post by 12.21.12
 


You missed alot.

And I did name constellations not stars.



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