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Clear Light "Lite": Does It Exist?

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posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 09:40 PM
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Most people are aware that ordinary clear sunlight can be split into constituent colors of light by the process of diffraction. If this is done with a prism, another prism can be positioned to cause the diffracted light to reconstitute back into clear light. (At least I think this can be done, having seen the process illustrated in a drawing. I have never actually done this myself.)

In painting and some kinds of printing, all of the colors of the spectrum can be created by mixing red, blue and yellow in various proportions.

We know that clear light can be created by mixing the right proportions of the diffracted color spectrum back into each other.

My question is that since we know that all of the spectral colors can be created by mixing the primary colors (red , blue and yellow), is it possible that by mixing three primary colors of light, in some proportion, it would be possible to create a sort of clear light "lite" as it were, like a facsimile of clear light.

If so, is there a technical name for this light?

[edit on 24-8-2010 by ipsedixit]




posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 09:44 PM
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I'm not exactly sure what your asking, but I just wanted to point out that Red BLue and Yellow are only primary colors In paint (Subtractive color combinations) In light the primaries are red blue and green (additive) like the bulbs you get on projection TV's



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 09:53 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 

Can those primaries be mixed to create clear light? I was thinking that if this were true it might have some interesting possibilities in terms of signalling where the signal could be sent in clear and then diffracted into the three primaries. Just sort of "blue skying" it a little.



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 09:59 PM
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As far as I know, if you shine a red flash light a green flash light and a blue flash light onto the same spot on a wall you will get white light. Thats kind of how televisions work

If thats what your asking



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 10:10 PM
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Originally posted by davespanners
As far as I know, if you shine a red flash light a green flash light and a blue flash light onto the same spot on a wall you will get white light. Thats kind of how televisions work

If thats what your asking


Cool, I never knew that.

Thanks for giving me something new today.



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 

That's what I was asking.

I wonder if, in terms of physics, that light has the same properties as the clear light derived from ordinary sunlight or if it constitutes some "lite" version of that light. I was wanting to know if there was a special technical term for this light (and whether it had any special uses).



[edit on 24-8-2010 by ipsedixit]



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 10:34 PM
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And it doesn't matter which side of the prism (Input or Output) the 2 edges that form the "Slit" are placed on, we get the same result....

Note in the case in the upper Drawing LIGHT passes through the Prism without producing any colours between the two bands of Colours Yellow to Red and Blue to Violet produced by the "Inverted" edge...

Only at the edges of the LIGHT formed by the edge (in the case of the Slit two edges one inverted to the other) Colours appear...

I or anyone else can't change this FACT....

The upper drawing of the two, shows a wide "Slit", the Lower shows a narrow "Slit"...

It Still takes both an edge (in the case of the Slit 2 Edges one Inverted to the other) and a Prism to see this Phenomena...

And Not a Prism on its Own !

So the Prism is 1/2 the cause while the Edge (edges) are the other 1/2 ???

Get hold of a Prism (can find one in some old or new Cameras or in Binoculars) and check it out for yourself ???

[edit on 24-8-2010 by The Matrix Traveller]



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 10:46 PM
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reply to post by The Matrix Traveller
 

Interesting. Thanks for the info. Do you know if the process can be reversed so that the diffracted portion can be "reconstituted" as it were, or would that sort of thing be a completely different sort of operation?

Maybe the diffracted light would have to be sent through a lens to focus it and re-create the original white light beam?


[edit on 24-8-2010 by ipsedixit]



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 10:48 PM
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White light from different sources is different, It's called color temperature, the light that we see from the sun also changes depending on it's angle so defining what color natural light is is quite hard.

You can see different color temperatures if you turn on a normal incandescent light bulb in a room, and the switch over to a fluorescent type. One will give off a more yellow white and the other a colder more blue light. You can get photography lights that simulate daylight but they are set at a kind of average midday temperature.

If you break a light up into its constituent colors and then recombine those colors as far as I know the light you get out is exactly the same as what you put in

I'm not sure about a special name or anything



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by davespanners
White light from different sources is different, It's called color temperature, the light that we see from the sun also changes depending on it's angle so defining what color natural light is is quite hard.


Yes, that's right. Every light would depend on what was producing it, i.e., what was radiating excess energy to produce the light. Using spectroscopy they can determine what is burning in a distant star. It would probably work for any light source. The diffraction patterns are all probably unique, even if they differ only slightly.



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 11:10 PM
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The answer is no.

There are no known "clear" photons as they relate to your brain's interpretation of the signal from your... lobes...

If you think there are... find them.

Case closed. Nothing secret about it.



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by RestingInPieces
 

In other words, what you are saying is that Crayola is not going to add "Clear" to their crayon box. Thanks for clearing that up.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 12:02 AM
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One interpretation of the matter relates to the ability of the brain to process the information it receives in the form of a stable radiation from outside the mindscape , meaning that our eyes and senses can only perceive some of the data it collects, and of that reduced spectrum, even less is comprehended in a way it can be meaningful in our day to day toil.

If it isn't comprehended it does not exist in our operational sphere, all of the hi tech instruments are only man made projections of our senses, of course they sometimes perceive much more than what we are able to explain and thus comprehend, and millions of theories on how things function are its proof, its not the light the problem in this, its our ability to know what really is going on, we try of course, but get sometimes confused in the process.

light is a mystery in itself, its as if photons created the frame of the window we are going to "see" things in, and its also capable of transferring information in itself, when we decode light for what it could really be, we will take the next leap forward!





posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by ipsedixit
 







If you pass any of the two colour bands through another prism (Inverted) we end up with the Band caused by the edge...



Or…..



Prisms are used in Cameras, Binoculars, and Telescopes as mirrors….

One such mirror…



As well as reflecting off two faces (internally) instead of just one.



No Colour produced here…

But as I said 2 Components are required to produce Colour…

a. An Edge or edges (as in the “Slit”).
b. A Prism.

and NOT just a Prism on its Own....

[edit on 25-8-2010 by The Matrix Traveller]



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 04:09 AM
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Originally posted by ipsedixit
reply to post by davespanners
 

That's what I was asking.

I wonder if, in terms of physics, that light has the same properties as the clear light derived from ordinary sunlight or if it constitutes some "lite" version of that light. I was wanting to know if there was a special technical term for this light (and whether it had any special uses).



[edit on 24-8-2010 by ipsedixit]

Sunlight isn't actually white. Not only that, but it's also affected by atmospheric conditions. Adding more fuel on the fire, but once it reaches our eye it's further affected by the diffusion of it bouncing off/around object in our locality. Not sure of that answers your question or not



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 05:54 AM
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reply to post by The Matrix Traveller
 


I'm a bit confused about this "edge" concept, as I had never heard of it before.

Is this image not real then? where is the edge?
Or am I misunderstanding something?

[edit on 25-8-2010 by davespanners]



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by davespanners
I'm a bit confused about this "edge" concept, as I had never heard of it before.

I second that emotion.

It's not uncommon to see diffracted light rainbows shed by pieces of glass hanging in chandeliers and sometimes by bevelled edges of window glass where there are old ornate style window panes.

Edges by themselves can be diffractors, though, can they not? Diffraction gratings (grids?) would be an example, I think. (I'm a long way from physics class.)

Incidentally here is a representation of the RGB additive color scheme. This is a good version. If you get one of those little pixel grabber apps and move your cursor into each of the colours. the correct RGB color values will show. Even the black backround is accurate. I've seen numerous illustrations of this where the people putting out the illustration were not so scrupulous and the values were off.



I don't know whether I am more astonished by the fact that red, green and blue produce white or that red and green minus blue produce YELLOW!!

I've got to learn more about this stuff, but I am assuming that the white light produced by red, green and blue, must be a form of, if not "clear lite", then white "lite".

[edit on 25-8-2010 by ipsedixit]



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 08:47 AM
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A couple of additional thoughts.

If you took the white light produced by the red, green and blue sources and then diffracted it with a prism, would it diffract into red, green and blue . . . or, would it diffract into the full rainbow spectrum?

I suspect that it would diffract into the full spectrum. In that case, the white produced by red, blue and green would not be white "lite".

I think like a painter and when you say red, green and blue to me, I tranlate it into red, blue + yellow and blue. In other words I can see a way that this RGB system can be thought of as another way of indicating the traditional three primary colors in painting, i.e., red, yellow and blue.

When I think of it that way, I have no trouble imagining that red, green and blue can produce white, since in painting, red, yellow and blue can generate the full spectrum, which also generates white.

In painting, mixing red and green will give some variation on brown, depending on the proportions of the two, so it is still a stretch for me to accept that mixing red and green light yields yellow.

On the subject of diffraction and diffraction grids. Everything we see has a molecular structure that acts as a diffraction grid, in a way, reflecting the wavelength of light associated with its color while trapping light of other wavelengths. Looked at that way, one could say that color is texture, or that color is produce by the interaction of light with texture.


[edit on 25-8-2010 by ipsedixit]



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 08:58 AM
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Your original question seemed pretty simple, but now I have spent a while looking into various pages explaining white light etc it just seems more and more complicated.

I'm not even sure I know what the word "white" means now. My head is starting to hurt



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 09:06 AM
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You might find the answers you seek buried somwhere in these two wiki articles
White light
Metamarism

A quote from the first article "Since the impression of white is obtained by three summations of light intensity across the visible spectrum, the number of combinations of light wavelengths that produce the sensation of white is practically infinite."

I think I understand what you mean about using it for encoding things now.. You combine three different intensities of red / blue /green through a prism someone else then uses another prism to break apart the white light and compares the intensities to some kind of encoding scheme.

All very interesting, but quite hard to grasp



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