It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Study: Microbes ate BP oil water plume

page: 1
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 05:24 PM
link   
Well this is confusing...

Study: Microbes ate BP oil water plume



A Manhattan-sized plume of oil spewed deep into the Gulf of Mexico by BP's broken Macondo well has been consumed by a newly discovered, fast-eating species of microbes, scientists reported today. The micro-organisms were apparently stimulated by the massive oil spill that began in April, and they degraded the hydrocarbons so efficiently that the plume is now undetectable, said Terry Hazen of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.


So looking over the Deepwater forum, is it me or is everything so damn contradictory?.. we have them saying the plume is there, then they say it isnt, then its back, Now its been eaten by bacteria... although wasnt a huge portion of it mostly methane?

So now its been taken care of by nature, lucky them, at least they have an excuse for not doing much next time since hey, nature will take care of it... and by a never before seen bacteria to boot. Although they do mention that there still is oil from the spill (a good 50%), but im sure some people will take the headlines of the consumption of the plume as a sign its all over, and every things hunky dory, and im sure it'll be spun like that by many.

So for me as an outsider, just what is the real current state of the GoM both under and above, is there any real definitive statement?... and I just thought, while it only mentions they used a Robot Sub and mass spectrometer to detect the plume, what if during the time they where not monitoring it the plume moved?, could it do so?

(granted its a news article and as such its fairly light on the details, so no reason to think they 'only' used a robot sub and mass spectrometer to keep an eye on the plume so im not saying their that lax)

Also what exactly does this mean...



Another factor was the consistency of the oil that came from the Macondo wellhead: light sweet Louisiana crude, an easily digestible substance for bacteria.


Dont know why but that description really irks me, 'light', 'sweet' , its more of that, it aint so bad speak, regardless if its true or not.

[edit on 24-8-2010 by BigfootNZ]




posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 05:41 PM
link   
the 'microbe' spin is just that 'SPIN' and 'Misinformation-&-Cover Story'


theres just too mny competent research facilities (Universities in Fla/La/Ala) which have issued reports from on-site investigations
that show a huge-mongous oil plume that is sitting at the seafloor...
from either the injecting of dispersants by BP at the well-head...-
or the deliberate fudging of the oil pollution ammounts of bbls gushing
by the govt overseers/ or misinformation by the 'truthful' engineers at BP itself !


last weeks statement that 75% of the gusher has been sequestered
is pure hoock-um,
so the govt lackies had to come up with another potential remedy---
(as to why there isn't a gigantic oil-slick thats visible)...
and they decided that 'microbes'/naturally occuring at that were the
agent that Kept-the-Gulf-from-Armageddon...

Yeah Right!



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 06:05 PM
link   
reply to post by BigfootNZ
 


more like dissolved from all the chemical dispersants,

they would love you to beleive it was 'microbes' though



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 06:15 PM
link   
Great news....

Does this mean it is Okay to pour my used motor oil down the drain ?

I mean..... just feeding the microbes a free meal ...... right? ...... heck it sounds like oil is good for nature.



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 07:04 PM
link   

Dont know why but that description really irks me, 'light', 'sweet' , its more of that, it aint so bad speak, regardless if its true or not.


Light and sweet makes it sound more like it'll be tasty in your seafood.


So looking over the Deepwater forum, is it me or is everything so damn contradictory?.. we have them saying the plume is there, then they say it isnt, then its back, Now its been eaten by bacteria... although wasnt a huge portion of it mostly methane?


Just like when they assured people it could not possibly "rain oil" because oil does not evaporate. Now they have stated that much of the oil evaporated.



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 07:17 PM
link   
If this is true it's fantastic news. Considering that natural oil spills have occurred in the Gulf for a long time, I guess it makes sense that oil-eating bacteria have evolved. Nature is very resourceful that way.

Now all we need is a bacteria with an appetite for Corexit



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 07:21 PM
link   
reply to post by deepred
 


I love it: Support your local microbes. Even if you live no where near the gulf, microbes need your help NOW.
Motor oil is kind of thin. Add grease if possible. Antifreeze is sugar to microbes. Don't be shy. Microbes of the world, unite.
A Quebec saying..."where there is shyness there is no fun."
Go for it.



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 07:25 PM
link   
reply to post by snowspirit
 


It's cute how yoou think industry terminology that existed well before this incident is somehow framed around this incident.

"light, sweet crude' is not new terminology.

----------------------------

And not that I buy the microbe story either way, but one of the reasons given for using a dispersant was so that the naturally occurring micro-organisms that eat crude (re: NOT the same as used motor oil, AT ALL) could do so more effectively.

After all, there are indeed micro-organisms who eat this 'light, sweet' unprocessed crude. They consume the millions of gallons of crude that seeps every year, so why should it be any different with this crude, beyond the sheer scale of thew incident?

So, the story is at least plausible.

That said, i dont think it happened overnight, and i think that whoever is saying these plumes are 'gone' is clearly lying.

now watch as my fan club will claim i am saying the spill is 'no big deal'







[edit on 24-8-2010 by justadood]



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 08:40 PM
link   
reply to post by BigfootNZ
 



The microbes evolved to consume hydrocarbons....


That would include methane...

Hope that clears up your confusion



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 08:50 PM
link   

Light crude oil is liquid petroleum that has a low density and flows freely at room temperature.[1] It has a low viscosity, low specific gravity and high API gravity due to the presence of a high proportion of light hydrocarbon fractions.[2] It generally has a low wax content. Light crude oil receives a higher price than heavy crude oil on commodity markets because it produces a higher percentage of gasoline and diesel fuel when converted into products by an oil refinery.

en.wikipedia.org...

The oil they were showing us on TV looked more like the consistency of peanut butter, very thick, heavy looking stuff. It didn't look "light" at all. I guess that isn't the same oil that's underwater that the microbes are consuming.


The term "sweet" originated because the low level of sulfur provides the oil with a mildly sweet taste and pleasant smell. Nineteenth century prospectors would taste and smell small quantities of the oil to determine its quality.

en.wikipedia.org...

See? Tasty stuff





edit to clarify:
Unlike the prospectors, I do know enough to keep it out of MY mouth


[edit on 24-8-2010 by snowspirit]



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 09:07 PM
link   
reply to post by BigfootNZ
 


This scares the poop out of me.

Microbes are adapting and evolving SO rapidly all of a sudden. The bacteria that "ate" the hydrocarbons in the oil plume belongs to the same family that just appeared inside eggs!!!

This is NOT good.

...The family is Proteobacteria; it was a new kind of salmonella that can now infect eggs (not just sit on the shell).

Proteobacteria:



The Proteobacteria are a major group (phylum) of bacteria. They include a wide variety of pathogens, such as Escherichia, Salmonella, Vibrio, Helicobacter, and many other notable genera. [2] Others are free-living, and include many of the bacteria responsible for nitrogen fixation.
Because of the great diversity of forms found in this group, the Proteobacteria are named after Proteus, the Greek god of the sea, capable of assuming many different shapes.[1] [3]



...so this recently mutated (NOT genetically engineered!) oil-eating protobacteria can digest hydrocarbons so efficiently that the oil plume disappeared inside of 2 weeks.

Also, it can not only survive at 41 degrees F, but function at super-capacity in the cold; so they're harvesting fish and shell fish from the area, and almost guaranteed, this super-protobacteria will hitchhike on the catches, and get onto the mainland where it will find another veritable feast of hydrocarbons...

Ahhh. The Circle of Life...



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 09:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by HunkaHunka
reply to post by BigfootNZ
 



The microbes evolved to consume hydrocarbons....


That would include methane...

Hope that clears up your confusion


It does thanks, I mostly thought Methane was a Hydrocarbon (high school chemistry was decades back
), I just wasnt sure about weather they'd consume it if it was a gas (The methane in the gulf is in liquid form isnt it due to the pressure and temperatures or is it more like suspended gas bubbles?), since I was more thinking of what people would think of as the crude being consumed primarily.

Mr Vertigo yes, given that poison Corexit, the natural oil crude seems almost benign doesnt it and not worth worrying about
.

Justadood, it is an old term most definitely, im just worried about those who are susceptible to positive wording reading the study or researchers comments and getting the wrong ideas... kinda like all those old cigarette advertisers describing the taste of their nicotine and tar sticks with words like, 'mellow flavored' etc.


Originally posted by snowspirit


The term "sweet" originated because the low level of sulfur provides the oil with a mildly sweet taste and pleasant smell. Nineteenth century prospectors would taste and smell small quantities of the oil to determine its quality.

en.wikipedia.org...

See? Tasty stuff


Yeah that clears that up... but why'd you'd taste that stuff is beyond me (says as he sticks some noodles dripping with sesame oil into his mouth)


Originally posted by soficrow

...so this recently mutated (NOT genetically engineered!) oil-eating protobacteria can digest hydrocarbons so efficiently that the oil plume disappeared inside of 2 weeks.

Also, it can not only survive at 41 degrees F, but function at super-capacity in the cold; so they're harvesting fish and shell fish from the area, and almost guaranteed, this super-protobacteria will hitchhike on the catches, and get onto the mainland where it will find another veritable feast of hydrocarbons...

Ahhh. The Circle of Life...


I wouldnt say its recently mutated thats going a bit far, there are many, many species of bacteria down there that do eat that sort of stuff, its just funny its one they hadn't seen before, although the gulf its deep and wide, and bacteria are rather small after all
... and its the perfect place for that type of organism to evolve. Its just suspicious that you have this gigantic plume and then bang... its gone in such a short time thanks to the natural life in the local environment.

If its that good at eating up hydrocarbons though... it must be pretty useful with quite a few applications, especially if it can eat that much crude, that fast... finding it might be a silver lining to this disaster?, not that anyone affected would reap the benefits.


[edit on 24-8-2010 by BigfootNZ]



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 09:31 PM
link   
That seems as though it is straight from MSM, because what I have been reading and seeing paints a different picture.



www.sott.net...


www.sott.net...

www.sott.net...

www.sott.net...

www.sott.net...

www.sott.net...

www.sott.net... t-of-the-Water-


www.sott.net...

www.sott.net...

www.sott.net...


This last article sounds like the usual cover our butts. I dont know, what do you believe? Myself it wont be BP or the government considering the track record on this particular case. Just this one incident alone, with all the lies in the beginning, is enough for me to think there is more to it than anything they wanna say on this matter. And I am not taking into account any past matters just this one alone. What do you think?

[edit on 06/02/2010 by letscit]



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 09:40 PM
link   
Doublethink?

Oil can destroy the environment! Trade in that old clunker that leaks oil on your driveway! Make sure you recycle all your used oil!

Oil eating microbes will eat all the oil from the gigantic oil spill though. Don't worry about that oil...



posted on Aug, 24 2010 @ 09:42 PM
link   

Originally posted by BigfootNZ

Originally posted by soficrow

...so this recently mutated (NOT genetically engineered!) oil-eating protobacteria can digest hydrocarbons so efficiently that the oil plume disappeared inside of 2 weeks.

Also, it can not only survive at 41 degrees F, but function at super-capacity in the cold; so they're harvesting fish and shell fish from the area, and almost guaranteed, this super-protobacteria will hitchhike on the catches, and get onto the mainland where it will find another veritable feast of hydrocarbons...

Ahhh. The Circle of Life...


I wouldnt say its recently mutated thats going a bit far, there are many, many species of bacteria down there that do eat that sort of stuff, its just funny its one they hadn't seen before, although the gulf its deep and wide, and bacteria are rather small after all
... and its the perfect place for that type of organism to evolve. Its just suspicious that you have this gigantic plume and then bang... its gone in such a short time thanks to the natural life in the local environment.

If its that good at eating up hydrocarbons though... it must be pretty useful with quite a few applications, especially if it can eat that much crude, that fast... finding it might be a silver lining to this disaster?, not that anyone affected would reap the benefits.




Honestly, I just don't trust these guys - they drilled in the wrong place and put the world at risk. Because they put profit first. Has that changed? No, it's gotten worse - now they're trying to limit their liability.

Silver lining? Not with these fools in charge.

I do believe a previously unknown species of Super-Protobacteria devoured the entire oil plume inside of 2 weeks. Is that species natural-and-unadulterated? Mutated? Genetically engineered or modified? I don't know; neither do you; and we can't believe anyone qualified and approved to comment.

These Super-Protobacteria eat hydrocarbons - that would be our entire energy industry. Interesting if they hit the mainland, dontcha think?

We already have a huge problem with new disease-causing microbial strains contaminating our food supply, many Protobacteria btw....

IMHO - our wild ride just got wilder.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 04:09 PM
link   
Dont have time to reply properly, but the connection between the eggs and the oil are right on... animal feed and oil are bedfellows...

Good call sophiecrow!



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 04:31 PM
link   
Firstly the oil isn't gone - a 20 some mile long plume last week was found last week. Its under the ocean, in the marshes and under the sand. The scientist in this study have BP interest and it is contradictory with other studies. I can't believe the BS they continue to feed people.

[edit on 25-8-2010 by crazydaisy]



posted on Aug, 26 2010 @ 06:32 PM
link   
reply to post by alpha chino
 


motor oil and unprocessed crude are VERY different things.

The oceans of the world process millions of gallons of raw crude every year. The many varieties of microbes that consume the stuff certainly helps.

Raw crude breaks down FAR faster the processed crude you see in oil spill like the Exxon Valdez.

This oil spill would have been FAR easier to manage if they had just let it hit the beaches, or skimmed it out of the water (that is to say, if they didnt use a dispersant). But that would have made the VAST majority of the public FREAK OUT because of the images of crude on the beaches, and the conspiracy theories about how 'they' want to destroy the beaches would be flying.

Damned if they do, damned if they dont.



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:12 AM
link   
Since it hasn´t been posted here explicitly, the institute that has conducted the study is sponsored by BP... Just what I´ve thought when I heard about it for the first time.

news.yahoo.com...



posted on Aug, 27 2010 @ 09:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by BigfootNZ

A Manhattan-sized plume of oil spewed deep into the Gulf of Mexico by BP's broken Macondo well has been consumed by a newly discovered, fast-eating species of microbes, scientists reported today.



These same scientists recently reported a Unicorn pooping Rainbow Skittles on the White House lawn.

Lovely,
Freakin Lovely!

[edit on 27-8-2010 by badgerprints]



new topics

top topics



 
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join