Pulse Detonation Wave Engines

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posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by Stealthbomber It is a mixture of (artist redition) some of the blurary ones are supost to be actual photos too be honest with you i am new at this sort of thing people manipulation photos this thing i hearing (Photoshop) yea i knew the one of the pilot looking out the jet window was not real (but i liked it) hey what do you think of the big (donut) maby a Cattipiller inner tube haha or a prototype of a magnetic coil or i think (Generator of a Dipole Gravitational field) of corse it is a artise rendition photo but i do know some of the early work on generating a Gravitational field how far they got with it i dont know. You know the US has Unlimited resorces when it comes to (Exotic Propulsion systems) but its like one of the others member said i want to beleive the Triangle shaped craft are real to be honest their have been so many people from all over the world that have seen siteing of thes craft its hard to think all of them are liers when there has been so many siteings anyway i thought some of the pictures like of the Eagles might make good wallpaper.I have the (phantom works division) Northrop Eagle on my phone for wallpaper. You know my friend the other member (Sammamishman) did not half to help me the way he did so much work just to teach me i half to admit at one point i had tears in my eyes. as i said before i have a great RESPECT for the post from all of you guys i cant thank all of you enough. GOD Bless all of you guys.
 




posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 09:49 AM
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AboveTopSecret.com
"VERDANA,ARIAL" size=2 color="#000000">

size=6 color="#CC0000"> "Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="5">PULSE
DETONATION WAVE ENGINES
"../images/engine.jpg" width=293 height=148 alt="Aurora's engines, could these be PDWEs?">




One option for a hypersonic vehicle might be four or six Pulse Detonation
Wave Engines (PDWEs), fuelled with liquid methane. As air breathers,
these PDWEs could theoretically propel a hypersonic aircraft towards
Mach 10 at an altitude in excess of 180,000 feet.
Used to power an trans-atmospheric vehicle, the same PDWEs might
be capable of lifting the craft to the edge of space when switched
to rocket mode.
size=3>Current theoretical operation of a PDWE
Liquid methane or liquid hydrogen is ejected onto the fuselage,
where the fuel mist is ignited, possibly by surface heating. The
PDWE works by creating a liquid hydrogen detonation inside a specially
designed chamber when the aircraft is traveling beyond the speed
of sound. When traveling at such speeds, a thrust wall (the aircraft
is traveling so fast that molecules in the air are rapidly pushed
aside near the nose of the aircraft which in essence becomes a wall)
is created in front of the aircraft. When the detonation takes place,
the airplane's thrust wall is pushed forward. This process is continually
repeated to propel the aircraft. From the ground the jet stream
looks like "donuts-on-a-rope."
Quoted below is a small description of how a PDWE would accelerate
a vehicle towards the hypersonic regime.
"...use a shock wave created in a detonation - an explosion that
propagates supersonically- to compress a fuel-oxidizer mixture prior
to combustion, similar to supersonic inlets that make use of external
and internal shock wave for pressurization."
Not much is known about Pulse Detonation Wave technology, but
there have been quite a few reports and sightings of mysterious
aircraft using propulsion technology unlike any heard or seen before.
On February 25, 26, and 27, 1992, there were night-time sightings
of an unknown aircraft with a "diamond-pattern" of lights at Beale
Air Force Base, which was thought to be the Aurora aircraft. The
aircraft had a distinctive engine noise, described as "a very, very
low rumble, like air rushing through a big tube." On the night of
February 26, what was thought to be a ground test of Aurora's propulsion
systems took place. A series of "booms" was heard and described
as similiar to "artillery fire" and "deep bass notes, not like sonic
booms." It was thought these were "light-off" tests of the engines.
It was speculated that the aircraft was using Pulse Detonation Wave
Engines. The noise and low frequency would, it was said, be consistent
with PDWE technology.
It has also been noted that despite the famous "Donuts-on-a-rope"
air contrails not being consistent with Aurora's propulsion system,
theses contrails can be produced by a PDWE operating outside of
its specified parameters.

"../images/d_on_r.jpg" width=196 height=170 alt="Donuts-on-rope contrails">



size=3>Interpreting known information
Although the observations recorded of vehicles with an unusual
trailing contrail and noise are intriguing, they are also difficult
to reconcile with one another. While many observers agree on the
unusual sounds created by these vehicles, a range of descriptions
are provided as to the nature of these sounds. The pulsating tone
emanating from these sightings has been taken as an indication of
the use of some form of pulse detonation wave engine. Some observers
report a characteristic frequency as high as 60 Hertz, while others
suggest a frequency as low as 1 Hertz.
But a technical analysis of pulse detonation wave engines suggests
that engines operating at the thrust levels associated with military
aircraft would operate between 100 and 200 Hertz (pulses per second).
While doppler shifting may reconcile this value with the reported
50-60 Hertz pulsation, it is more difficult to reconcile this with
the reports of a 1 Hertz pulsation.
It is also difficult to reconcile a pulse rate of 100-200 Hertz
with the observed donut-on-a-rope contrails. The association of
these contrails with a PDWE would seem to be predicated on the observation
that each "donut" is a product of a single pulse detonation. Based
on published photographs, the "donuts" appear to be approximately
100 meters apart. Assuming a detonation pulse rate of 100 Hertz,
this would imply a velocity of 10 kilometers per second, roughly
Mach 36 which is 1½ times orbital velocity. While it is asserted
that the Aurora spyplane is a high-speed vehicle, this is at least
four times faster than the speeds normally associated with this
aircraft.
In addition, a closer examination of the published photographs
reveals a significant irregularity in the spacing between the donuts
on the rope. This would seem to be inconsistent with the normal
functioning of a pulse detonation wave engine.

(reprinted with permission)


Whoaaa I would have read this but seeing as there is no formatting I can't skim to the important bits.

Please reformat to a friendlier read.

Peace,

Korg.



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by jerry777
 


The big donut looking thing is a concept for an inflatable space station. They were looking at bringing it into space as a small package then inflating it, it went into production but was never actually used in space.



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 04:31 PM
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AboveTopSecret.com
The pulsating tone emanating from these sightings has been taken as an indication of the use of some form of pulse detonation wave engine. Some observers report a characteristic frequency as high as 60 Hertz, while others suggest a frequency as low as 1 Hertz.

But a technical analysis of pulse detonation wave engines suggests that engines operating at the thrust levels associated with military aircraft would operate between 100 and 200 Hertz (pulses per second). While doppler shifting may reconcile this value with the reported 50-60 Hertz pulsation, it is more difficult to reconcile this with the reports of a 1 Hertz pulsation.

It is also difficult to reconcile a pulse rate of 100-200 Hertz with the observed donut-on-a-rope contrails. The association of these contrails with a PDWE would seem to be predicated on the observation that each "donut" is a product of a single pulse detonation. Based on published photographs, the "donuts" appear to be approximately 100 meters apart. Assuming a detonation pulse rate of 100 Hertz, this would imply a velocity of 10 kilometers per second, roughly Mach 36 which is 1½ times orbital velocity.


The Argus pulse jet powerplant of a German V-1 buzz bomb had a resonant frequency of around 47-50Hz, but it didn't go anywhere near supersonic. Seems to me that in order to power a craft at multiple Mach speeds at altitudes where there is almost no atmosphere, you're going to have to drive the resonance up into the many thousands of Hertz, which is going to create a high-pitched scream. (Although high up in the mesophere, and using ionized particles for a combustion catalyst, it might not make any noise at all.) If there is any contrail at all -- possibly only sparkly lines of clear ice -- the pulses would be so close together that it would look smooth, not bumpy.



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by Stealthbomber
 
really now i know thanks by the way what is your openion of Dr. Steven Greer
[url=http://www.youtube.com...]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=83v5Rgeu2Yc[ /url]
it not what there talking about that intrests me its all the people in the meeting lissining?
edit on 12-12-2013 by jerry777 because: oops





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