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Why can't we remember sound ?

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posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by LeBombDiggity
 
That's really sad and I hope you can remember all the other things like scent, scenes. touch and music she loved. Often it's the songs which touch a nerve that help to spring surprise memories on us.

You know what? I'll bet that within a week you'll dream of your mother and hear her voice. Life's funny that way.




posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by Stuffed

Although I'm not entirely sure it's music that can train you to remember music. Maybe people who are more "programmed" for the audio instead of visual have a higher likelihood of becoming a musician or more musically inclined individual.


Of course. I mean, in my mind there is little doubt that the "inclination" comes first. I don't think the practice of music "trains" anything that wasn't there from the beginning.

I would however like to point out (because, who knows, it might be of some use to someone out there) that auditory and visual susceptilibity, to name just two senses, are in no way mutually exclusive or that the development of one is necessarily detrimental to the other.

Retention, that's another matter. My retention of faces, fabric patterns, etc. is oddly hazy. I've always been puzzled by it, especially since I am very "visual". I mean, I can easily imagine anything, no matter how outlandish, and very vividly, to the last detail (I am also good at drawing, especially portraits) - I just don't remember visuals (external to my imagination) very well.



[edit on 22-8-2010 by AdAstra]

[edit on 22-8-2010 by AdAstra]



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 01:54 PM
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Different people remember things differently. For me, my father passed away more than 5 years ago and when I dream of him, every sound, smell, feel, everything almost makes me feel like he is still alive and well and still expecting more from me every day. At first this was strange, I would dream of my family and he would be there and we would say how much we missed him, or just leave the subject alone all together and it would be the elephant in the room we just didn’t mention, but I always make sure to make the most of my time in these dreams, as unfortunately this is the only way I have to be around my dad.

If you are having trouble remember sounds, maybe try thinking about the things your mother said and what she was doing when she said them, think on it hard and constant as you fall asleep, and you may just get to see her and hear her again.

From one grieving soul to another if you can have this experience; you will never forget it and wake up feeling a joy you almost can’t believe. Just typing this right now is getting me worked up so I will go now. Good luck to you and your lost memories and much respect for bringing up such a hard to discuss problem so open and honestly.



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 01:56 PM
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I remember sound, I remember smell, I remember it all. Maybe your trying to hard, relax, look at some pictures of your mum and just let the memories flood in. The trick is to remember conversations you've had, not just her voice. I'm sure you will here her voice in no time.

Sorry for your loss and remember you will hear her voice again someday.

Peace.
ALS

[edit on 22-8-2010 by ALOSTSOUL]



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 02:04 PM
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I don't think anybody suggested this yet, but do you have any audio recordings of your mother? Perhaps that would help. Even if not, it would still be nice to listen to.



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 02:34 PM
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I think there might be truth in the assertion that those musically inclined have a better retention of sound memories. And I say that simply because I'm not musical at all, well, I've certainly never played an instrument without a gun to my head.

When I said Mum died a few years, well, it was over 20 yrs ago when I was a kid. Dad never owned a video camera (too expensive) and for whatever reason didn't think it necessary to record Mum's voice, they were little older than kids themselves when they had me. Money was tight & they had to prioritise, sound recordings just didn't come into it.

I wish I could remember sounds like some of you folks, maybe I am trying too hard. Have hit a bit of a bump on life's long winding road, work pressures and personal problems have been piling up, my head feels like it's about to burst ... and I miss Mum terribly right now.


Nvrm, am sure I'll hear her again sometime, it's a bloody long wait though.



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 02:47 PM
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Hey lbd, sorry for your loss and sadness in this situation. But know this, you have spurred me to start recording/filming times with my folks, so that I at least have memories to reference and cherish forever.
Interesting thread and thanks for sharing your personal experience.

Peace



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by LeBombDiggity
 


I understand a little more now, LBD. If it's been over 20 years, and I assume you were quite young when you last heard her voice, that would make it very difficult indeed to recall the sound.

Just wondering out loud if a trained hypnotist could help? Your memories are still in there somewhere, you just need help in accessing them.

Either way your story is sad; I hope things improve for you soon!



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 03:46 PM
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Originally posted by LeBombDiggity
My Mum died a few years ago. She was the best Mum ever, a saint, but I guess everyone says that about theirs too


But I can't remember her voice and I'm finding that really upsetting. I sometimes see women who look like her, sets my heart a fluttering for a fraction of a second when I see them ... I see Mum in her cousin (they look so alike) ... so I obviously remember what she looks like, heck I've got albums full of pictures of her entire life so I'm hardly likely to forget.

But it's this loss of sound memories which I find so grievous.



Most people process visually, and therefor visual memory is paramount. Due to an issue with my sight during my teen years, my brain works more clearly with sounds. I remember voices WAY better than faces. I can remember intricacies of sounds in spectrum. Yet, I've had problems with facial recognition and other visual memory. I have trained myself to be better with visual memory now with some effort. So, I don't think it's beyond developing your auditory cortex if you want to put in the effort. I'm now a photographer and visual artist after being a musician for years.

You won't be able to get back any lost memories, but you can train yourself to remember sounds if you want to.



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