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Ultraviolet light reveals how ancient Greek statues really looked

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posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 03:23 AM
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This article shows how through the use of special lighting and other techniques, one can now see the original colors used on ancient statues of the past such as those from Greek mythology that we usually see in white.

I found this article very interesting, and very much worth a read.

Here is an example picture, but there are more at this link!




Original Greek statues were brightly painted, but after thousands of years, those paints have worn away. Find out how shining a light on the statues can be all that's required to see them as they were thousands of years ago.


I can't help but wonder how modern science will re-characterize these cultures as the colors become more vivid. Some of those look like colors from the hippie era to me in a way, which by today's standards almost seem gaudy or tacky. Nah. They are what they are: a modern glimpse at a distant, all-but-forgotten past! Way cool to me!




posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 03:29 AM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican
Some of those look like colors from the hippie era to me in a way, which by today's standards almost seem gaudy or tacky.


The Egyptians, Mayans and Aztecs were also big on painting their large statues and monuments. And they all had a tendency to get carried away with bright colors. I suppose when you don't have TV or comic books, that's what you do.



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 06:09 AM
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This is the type of post I enjoy, Thanks



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 08:10 AM
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Cool find, but anyone else think they looked better just plain old jane? Those colours are hideous, lol. I know they didnt have as much choice but seriously, less is more.

EMM



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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Nice post! very interesting.

I seem to remember reading that some old British churches also used to be painted in bright colors like this, but I can't for the life of me find a link to any examples so I might have imagined it


[edit on 21-8-2010 by davespanners]



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 08:35 AM
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Another great find TrueAmerican!

Once again S&F'ed with my thanks for the information!



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 08:38 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


I call shenanigans! There's no way we were this terrible at painting.

This is a Roman plot to discredit us!


Kewl find.



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 08:55 AM
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My God what a fabulous hair do! Wonder who his stylist was?

what a wonderful find. S&F
Thank u for posting!!



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 09:04 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


I had no idea that Greek statuary was painted at one time.

In the example you show, is it just me, or doesn't the plain statue look like you can see the carving detail more clearly?

It would have been amazing to see a city dressed up in color like that, but it reminds me of an Earl Schibe paint job, on a $60,000 car!



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 09:19 AM
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false and misleading very reconstructionist. these are all renditions and have nothing to do with spectography.



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 09:35 AM
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Originally posted by Blanca Rose
It would have been amazing to see a city dressed up in color like that...


Yeah exactly. That's what I think of when I see something like this. We have all the movies which go to great lengths to produce ancient movie stages. But with technology like this I wonder just how accurate they could get those colors to total era accuracy.

I think in the movie 300 they had to get pretty darn close. Cause that was something!



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 09:38 AM
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Dang!

I prefer them without color...

Neat find, was an interesting read.



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 09:44 AM
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it gives more personallity to the statues but kind of shocking indeed.
wouldnt expect such colors.



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 10:09 AM
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Another interesting thing is the little alien in the picture. These angels really don't like clothes do they. And they never have genitals. Which means they must have been made by someone.

But I always found it odd they are so small. Yet, the Greek God's were bigger than us. It only makes sense if they were made to spy on us. Being that small you might not notice them unless they wanted to be noticed. Which makes sense actually. You ever noticed how those little aliens are always peeking around the corner. Or they are behind someone whispering in their ear. They are always in hiding basically.



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 10:15 AM
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awww, this has changed my outlook on all statues, makes me sad.



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 10:22 AM
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reply to post by Dr Slim
 


Why? We've been finding evidence of humans using colored paints and oils from tens of thousands of years ago.

Now just imagine all those cool ancient cave drawings. They should use some of these techniques on those (they probably already do.) Because at one time many were vibrant with color.

Compare that to how fast the paint on a car fades these days. They were getting hundreds of years out of their paint jobs- AT LEAST! While today we can't get more than 10 it seems.


They just don't paint them like they used to.



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican
reply to post by Dr Slim
 


Why? We've been finding evidence of humans using colored paints and oils from tens of thousands of years ago.

Now just imagine all those cool ancient cave drawings. They should use some of these techniques on those (they probably already do.) Because at one time many were vibrant with color.

Compare that to how fast the paint on a car fades these days. They were getting hundreds of years out of their paint jobs- AT LEAST! While today we can't get more than 10 it seems.


They just don't paint them like they used to.




The root problem is that we tricked ourselves into accepting plain sculptures sans coloration. Now we hafta go back and paint our prior works because they are historically wrong.

Do you have any idea how much paint will be required for Mount Rushmore? And, I suppose, we should even put the Stature of Liberty on the list because it is just a big stature.



[edit on 21-8-2010 by Aliensun]



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 10:49 AM
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yep,

but this is an old story

I learned that on my college
10 years ago (history of art)

btw, they painted all of their stuff
like this, including the big architecture



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 11:00 AM
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The original colors probably weren't as vibrant as they are in the reconstructions. The wall paintings from Pompeii probably give a better sense. Remember, this was before synthetic pigments. Our whole sense of "classical" beauty, with its austerity and subtlety, goes back to good old Gottfried Lessing, a German critic who lacked the benefit of modern archaeological knowledge when he invented "classicism" two centuries ago. Ancient Greek temples probably looked a lot like modern Hindu temples, with their garish statues, icons and offerings. (No slight intended to Hinduism.)



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


OH Noooooooo,
two



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