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Looking for books on early civilizations

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posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 08:57 PM
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What do the members of ATS think are the most credible books on early civilization?

I'm also looking for books particularly on early Druidic, Celtic, and Meso-american civilization.

Thank you!!!




posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 09:02 PM
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Hey I hope I can help you here. You can try Amazon and see what they got. A lot of the time they have a great list of books for sell.



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by Romantic_Rebel
 


Yeah, Amazon is great, thats were I get all my books. Buut I'm looking for books that people have read and recommend



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by SlyFox_79
 


Well if you ever go to Reno. NV. Check out www.dharmabooks.biz...
They have a great selection of books you are looking for. At a great price!!!



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by SlyFox_79
 


As far as history, "Histories" by Herodotus is a pretty interesting read. He's been called the father of history by some. He was an ancient Greek who traveled a lot and collected stories. A good bit about Egypt in it too.



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 09:18 PM
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C. Leonard Wooley - "The Sumerians"
Samuel N. Kramer - "The Sumerians: Their History, Culture, and Character"



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 09:43 PM
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reply to post by SlyFox_79
 


One place that most people forget to buy books at is their
local college library when they get rid of their old collections..



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 09:46 PM
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Thank you for your suggestions!!!



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 10:28 PM
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I took a course that covered this; a pretty thorough book is ;

Dunstan, W. E., The Ancient Near East



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 11:41 PM
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reply to post by SlyFox_79
 

A must read is The Sun in Myth and Art, Mandajeet Singh, UNESCO, 1993.
It thematically connects ancient civilizations with the common theme of sun symbolism, and is packed with rare facts and photos.

Here is a little gallery from the book:

amazingdiscoveries.org...



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 01:05 AM
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I'm not sure how far back you want to go, but here is one book that comes to mind. When I was in college I took an ancient history course. One of the books we were required to purchase was called The Source by James Michener. While it is fiction, Michener wrote it in such a way that it could be used as a teaching tool because so much of it is based on historical facts, although given that the book is somewhat dated, some of those facts may no longer be accurate. Regardless, it still makes for a very interesting read.

Here's a short description found on Amazon:

"In the grand storytelling style that is his signature, James Michener sweeps us back through time to the very beginnings of the Jewish faith, thousands of years ago. Through the predecessors of four modern men and women, we experience the entire colorful history of the Jews, including the life of the early Hebrews and their persecutions, the impact of Christianity, the Crusades, and the Spanish Inquisition, all the way to the founding of present-day Israel and the Middle-East conflict."



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 11:19 AM
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There are many... for the Mayans, I can recommend the books referenced by the Wikipedia article on them:
en.wikipedia.org...

Druids... the GOOD material on them is very scarce. Julius Caesar is probably the premiere source for this, but there's a scholarly group called the Celtic Reconstructionists (includes one member who has a PhD in the Celtic languages.) I've worked with them and know a few of the members ... they're VERY picky on what they accept.
paganachd.com...

Going to library sales and hunting up used books from colleges (previous editions often go for nickles on the dollar at Half Priced Books) are a good idea.

I can't find (or remember) the title of a book that I had on how ancient man (australopithecus onward) spread throughout the world. If I can find it, I'll add it here.



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by SlyFox_79
 


You may want to check out Graham Hancocks books, Fingerprints of the Gods, The Sign and Seal among others, all available on amazon.com


www.grahamhancock.com...


Another site you may want to check out.


metahistory.org...



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 01:38 PM
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William James's "The Tribes and the States" -
www.sidis.net...

the only history of early america based upon indian Wampum...
Also see Willam James Sidis Wiki entry, he was a super genius..



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 07:17 PM
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Originally posted by Aquarius1
reply to post by SlyFox_79
 


You may want to check out Graham Hancocks books, Fingerprints of the Gods, The Sign and Seal among others, all available on amazon.com



Only if your not seriously trying to learn what is known.

Harte



posted on Aug, 21 2010 @ 09:05 PM
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Originally posted by Harte

Originally posted by Aquarius1
reply to post by SlyFox_79
 


You may want to check out Graham Hancocks books, Fingerprints of the Gods, The Sign and Seal among others, all available on amazon.com



Only if your not seriously trying to learn what is known.

Harte


Grahams research is no more right or wrong then main stream researchers who only release information that matches their paradigm.



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by Aquarius1
Grahams research is no more right or wrong then main stream researchers who only release information that matches their paradigm.


Actually, it's been demonstrated to be wrong many times (yes, I'm familiar with him and his theories.) Like many who haven't labored through a lot of courses on their subjects, they take short cuts (he doesn't read hieroglyphics... a necessity for doing in depth research) and he ignores data that does not conform to his ideas (measurement errors and positioning errors.)

To a scientist, an error is useful information. You don't ignore it because it says that there may be a problem with your idea or that you've missed a connection. Mainstream researchers have to contend with fellow academics who have other views of their topic (believe me, there's heated arguments in the Egyptological community.)

Hancock doesn't and didn't hang out with this bunch so he's rather unaware of all the latest that's going on there.



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


I do understand what your saying, Graham has been a catalyst for me to do further research, it was in the nineties when I first heard him that tweaked my interest to look further, so I am grateful to him for that.

Thanks Byrd



posted on Aug, 22 2010 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by Aquarius1
reply to post by Byrd
 


I do understand what your saying, Graham has been a catalyst for me to do further research, it was in the nineties when I first heard him that tweaked my interest to look further, so I am grateful to him for that.

Thanks Byrd


Hancock has probably inspired many to further research, resulting in the serious ones feeling quite a bit different about him once they learned how he twists the truth and omits facts.

He's a good writer though. And he has admitted several of the mistakes he's made, including actually stating that "Fingerprints of the Gods" was poorly researched - a ridiculous understatement in my opinion, but an admission nonetheless. This is very much unlike the VAST majority of pseudoscience writers preying on people who simply aren't aware they are being basically lied to.

Harte



posted on Sep, 11 2010 @ 06:13 PM
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Four ages of man detailed here.
I'd say from the writings of humans themselves.

That's mostly about surviving the most catastrophic times.

Some theories on ancient sailors to America.
I recall something about the ships being identified in the bible and they ended sailing at the fall
of Rome 400 and thus in 1000 years of isolation by 1492 they ended up American Indians.
All that remains are Roman coins found in America from time to time.
I wonder how long it took before they finally buried them for safe keeping and forgot all about them.



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