How come I can't drink a beer or two on the ride home?? *Please read entire OP before posting*

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posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by OldDragger
 


"You know what?
Just wait till you get home man."
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I adressed that in the OP.
________________________
"Sorry, but if you or your buddies can't wait a short while to drink, you DO have a problem even if you don't admit it."
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No need to be sorry I admitted it in the OP
_____________________________
"Obviously you are young and think nothing will ever happen to you.
Dream on. "
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an assumption and an insult, again I addressed this in the OP
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"Sorry, I know nobody will like this post, but really nobody needs to be drinking in a car. "
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Again no need to be sorry I respect your opinion and your input.

~meathead




posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:21 PM
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Alethea:


"No. A passenger should not have the right to drink in the vehicle even if it is being operated by someone else.

Some people get testy or violent when drinking and could become argumentative. This in turn could cause distraction of the driver.

Some people puke when drinking. This also could cause a distraction to driver.

Should driver get pulled over for any reason, it could be questionable as to whether he is guilty by association. A "friend" would not put a "friend" in this kind of jeopardy.

A drinking passenger could become unruly and exhibit behavior that could cause harm to others or to self."

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Excellent point! thank you for bringing that up

I will let Spikeys comment be my response as to not take undue credit:
_______________________________________________________

spikey:

"Within a moving vehicle, the only real consideration as far as the law goes should be whether or not the driver/operator of the vehicle is drunk (or drinking alcohol) or not.

Put it this way, if your boss picked you up from a bar you'd been at, and you were nine sheets to the wind (English expression, meaning drunk as a skunk), he could quite legally take you home in his car yeah?

So what difference does it make if you are drunk as a skunk AS you get into the car, or get that way AFTER you get in? Drunk is drunk. "

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And I do understand that there are "mean drunks" i have met many, and before my switch to the "only beer rule" I may have been considered one.

The instance i originally gave was not that of the passenger (me) being three sheets to the wind, but of the "average joe", if you will, who has a beer or two after work.

I was hesitant to actually make this thread, but I am glad that I did now, Its always good to see others peoples views even if they dont agree




~meathead



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by facelift
 


Fair do's, (and i am harmless, i assure you), you were saying that having a drunk person, or at least someone who is drinking as a passenger is a danger, in case the fully sober driver has..i don't know, say a heart attack or fit or something yeah?

I read that as implying that the drunk (drinking) passenger may not be able to react quickly enough to save the vehicle from crashing etc right?

The examples i gave are all pertinent to your reasons for not having someone drink in the car aren't they?

And for the record, it doesn't get much more hypothetical than a sober driver blacking out as a reason to not drink in a car mate!




posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by facelift
 


If the sober driver becomes incapacitated for whatever reason, who's next in line..?
___________________________________

Not me I didnt even have a license at the time..Misuse of plates when i was young had a 4 year suspension.No it was not Alcohol related
, but thats another thread....


~meathead



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by Alethea
 


What you said may be true of some people, but doesn't logic follow that a cab driver (or anyone come to that) should not take fares from a bar or club?

After all, it's a safe bet they have been drinking and drunk, so wouldn't it follow that they could also get testy, puke etc?

Should it be illegal to have a 'designated driver' then?



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:30 PM
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Well, OP, this is just another example of the government butting into our lives too much, to create laws that "protect us" from ourselves of all people, and fine us for breaking those laws, to fund their making of those laws.

That's why.



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:30 PM
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Originally posted by facelift
reply to post by spikey
 


What if the driver who get's incapacitated (for whatever reason) is carrying an ALREADY drunk person? Like, a cab picking up a fare from a bar or club?

What if the same driver picks up a fare from the hospital, in a body cast?

What if the driver's on his/her own? Who takes the wheel then?



These are hypotheticals and do not apply to the OP...and why didn't you include an example with an alien craft hitting the driver and the passenger with a drunk beam if you're gonna go off in that direction..?





No offense mate, but that's a weak argument.


None taken as you seem harmless...



Actually he's totally right and he was responding to an identical hypothetical. If I'm giving my already drunk friend a ride home and I become incapacitated, how is that different than becoming incapacitated while having a friend who is drinking in the passenger seat?

He may be harmless but you didn't even provide a sensible rebuttal. You harmed yourself.



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by spikey
 


It should be allowed as long as there is at least 1 sober person of age to drive in the car...

[edit on 20-8-2010 by fightingfoos]

[edit on 20-8-2010 by fightingfoos]



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by OldDragger
 



Obviously you are young and think nothing will ever happen to you.
Dream on.


Would a "young" person have a "meathead" avatar from a 70's sitcom?(I loved All In The Family btw
)
I think he was upfront about his alcoholism too, and I don't see him as denying reality, by thinking he is impervious to harm either. That is an insult, imo.
Other than that I agree with you, no open alcohol in a car is best for everyone.

spec


[edit on 20-8-2010 by speculativeoptimist]



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by fightingfoos
 


Totally agree.

But hey, what can i say, we don't make the laws eh?



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:37 PM
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reply to post by dbloch7986
 


Cheers for that, my point entirely.

He seems a good guy though...and pretty harmless as well



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:41 PM
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Anyways, thanks ALL for the interesting debate.

I'm gonna sign off now, i've got a nice bottle of red to finish glugging before i drive the kids to grandma's house for a visit!!



Relax, i'm not going to drink in the car!

Only kidding folks, i never drink and drive.

Night all.



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:46 PM
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Open container is perfectly legal in most, if not all states if you are driving a motorhome. The requirement is that it must have a refrigerator, or if your in a limo, you must be separated from the drivers area with a barrier.

This means you should be ok in the back of a pickup truck, as long as there are no available seats left to occupy in the front.



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:47 PM
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reply to post by dbloch7986
 


"He may be harmless but you didn't even provide a sensible rebuttal."


i think you are missing his point, i may be wrong and hopefully he will chime back in.

but if i am right he is saying that the law is designed to prevent a 'situation' where an intoxicated individual finds themselves in a situation where they have to get behind the wheel.

so as to prevent that, the made a no open container law. makes sense actually.



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:49 PM
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I had never considered this law until I moved to Japan - where it is perfectly legal.

In Japan, the legal limit is %0.03, and there is a mutual responsibility law on the books stating that all adults in the car can be charged if the driver is found to be DUI. The logic being that you, as a passenger and a responsible adult, should have stopped them.

As a responsible adult, you have the right to engage in legal activity (drinking a beer in the passenger seat, if you like), along with the responsibility to not give any to the driver. The consequences for doing so are strict.

Pretty simple arrangement, really.

Its not something people do all the time, but every once in a while - say, coming back from a day of snowboarding - its kind of nice to lean the seat back and have a beer and relax. Oh, and knowing that the government isn't treating you like a child is a good feeling, too.



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:53 PM
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This is a great topic OP and a totally reasonable question. I have asked myself this same question numerous times.

Being unruly or testy or angry or throwing up or distracting the driver can also apply to transporting: kids, babies, any angry spouse or partner or friend, or listening to political talk radio, eating, talking to someone, talking on a cell phone, road rage, having a bad day at work. Gettong overly brave happens in street races all the time in traffic filled highways without drugs or alcohol involved. As someone pointed out, limo drivers transport people who are actively consuming alcohol in the back.

Should we regulate all that?



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:55 PM
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This is a great topic OP and a totally reasonable question. I have asked myself this same question numerous times.

Being unruly or testy or angry or throwing up or distracting the driver can also apply to transporting: kids, babies, any angry spouse or partner or friend, or listening to political talk radio, eating, talking to someone, talking on a cell phone, road rage, having a bad day at work. Gettong overly brave happens in street races all the time in traffic filled highways without drugs or alcohol involved. As someone pointed out, limo drivers transport people who are actively consuming alcohol in the back.

Should we regulate all that?



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by trippinonadaisy
 


"He may be harmless but you didn't even provide a sensible rebuttal."


i think you are missing his point, i may be wrong and hopefully he will chime back in.

but if i am right he is saying that the law is designed to prevent a 'situation' where an intoxicated individual finds themselves in a situation where they have to get behind the wheel"
________________________________________________
in the spirit of conversation:

When was thier a Law passed stating a passenger Must take over and continue the journey if the driver becomes incapacitated?

What would a sober driver do in the case of incapacitation if thier was no passenger?

What if the passenger does not have the legal qualifications to drive?

What if the passenger chooses to not drive?

I do not get this arguement that a passenger must remain sober in order to take over for the driver in case of emergency?

Along that line of thought, if i am visiting my friends home for a barbeque am I not allowed to drink because they might become incapacitated and if so its my responsability to drive them to the hospital?



~meathead



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by vox2442
 


Thank you for your post!

That is a very logical way of dealing with the issue .

~meathead



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by trippinonadaisy
 


How is that different than transporting an already intoxicated individual? Or and individual with narcolepsy or epilepsy, which both can incapacitate you while driving? Why is the intoxicated person obligated to take the wheel?

That was the point.





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