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What does Bare Arms really mean?

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posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 10:07 PM
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Wow. Who would have thought that a less than firm grasp on vocabulary and spelling could lead to confusion over a weapon?

I can just imagine someone brought up on weapons charges for carrying a well displayed uzi around town using the defense of poor vocabulary.


[edit on 18/8/2010 by Chamberf=6]




posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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The Second Amendment reads:


A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.


Bear defined:


1. To hold up; support.

2. To carry from one place to another; transport.


As a verb transitive, the online dictionary definition I linked lists 14 different definitions, but the first two are more germane to the 2nd Amendment.

Since we are considering the meaning of words within the text of the 2nd Amendment, perhaps it would be a good idea to see what the definition of infringe is:


1. To transgress or exceed the limits of; violate: infringe a contract; infringe a patent.

2. Obsolete To defeat; invalidate.


That is the definition of the verb transitive, below is the definition of the verb intransitive:


To encroach on someone or something; engage in trespassing:


Now let's take a close look at the definition of shall, which is actually the legal definition of the word:


shall v. 1) an imperative command as in "you shall not kill." 2) in some statutes, "shall" is a direction but does not mean mandatory, depending on the context.


Since the word "shall" has not been defined by the Constitution, we must turn to the ordinary meaning of the word:


1. Used before a verb in the infinitive to show:

a. Something that will take place or exist in the future: We shall arrive tomorrow.
b. Something, such as an order, promise, requirement, or obligation: You shall leave now. He shall answer for his misdeeds. The penalty shall not exceed two years in prison.
c. The will to do something or have something take place: I shall go out if I feel like it.
d. Something that is inevitable: That day shall come.


The second definition, is in regard to the archaic usage of the word, which in the Context of the Constitution would probably be the best understanding of the word:


2. Archaic a. To be able to. b. To have to; must.


Now let us look at the definition of the word arms:


1. (Military / Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) weapons collectively



bear arms a. (Military) to carry weapons


The right to keep and bear arms is a right belonging to the people, not well regulated militias, and this is made clear by the language of the 2nd Amendment. The reason the people have a right to keep and bear arms is explained by the need for a well regulated militia to ensure the security of a free state. The term "illegal weapons" seems to be a clear infringement upon the right of the people to keep and bear arms.



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by HunkaHunka
...
your thoughts?


Your spell check is broken and you're not paying attention.


Main Entry: bear
Pronunciation: \ˈber\
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural bears
Usage: often attributive
Etymology: Middle English bere, from Old English bera; akin to Old English brūn brown — more at brown
Date: before 12th century
1or plural bear : any of a family (Ursidae of the order Carnivora) of large heavy mammals of America and Eurasia that have long shaggy hair, rudimentary tails, and plantigrade feet and feed largely on fruit, plant matter, and insects as well as on flesh
2 : a surly, uncouth, burly, or shambling person
3 [probably from the proverb about selling the bearskin before catching the bear] : one that sells securities or commodities in expectation of a price decline — compare bull
4 : something difficult to do or deal with


It obviously means we have the right to have bear arms... you know: the fuzzy ones... in our possession or maybe something difficult to deal with like an oven.

Oh wait....


Main Entry: bear
Function: verb
Inflected Form(s): bore \ˈbȯr\; borne also born \ˈbȯrn\; bear·ing
Etymology: Middle English beren to carry, bring forth, from Old English beran; akin to Old High German beran to carry, Latin ferre, Greek pherein
Date: before 12th century
transitive verb
1 a : to move while holding up and supporting b : to be equipped or furnished with c : behave, conduct d : to have as a feature or characteristic e : to give as testimony f : to have as an identification g : to hold in the mind or emotions h : disseminate i : lead, escort j : render, give
2 a : to give birth to b : to produce as yield c (1) : to permit growth of (2) : contain
3 a : to support the weight of : sustain b : to accept or allow oneself to be subjected to especially without giving way c : to call for as suitable or essential d : to hold above, on top, or aloft e : to admit of : allow f : assume, accept
4 : thrust, press

intransitive verb
1 : to produce fruit : yield
2 a : to force one's way b : to extend in a direction indicated or implied c : to be situated : lie d : to become directed e : to go or incline in an indicated direction
3 : to support a weight or strain —often used with up
4 a : to exert influence or force b : apply, pertain —often used with on or upon

— bear a hand : to join in and help out

— bear arms 1 : to carry or possess arms
2 : to serve as a soldier

— bear fruit : to come to satisfying fruition, production, or development

— bear in mind : to think of especially as a warning : remember

— bear with : to be indulgent, patient, or forbearing with

...

[emphasis added]

[edit on 8/18/2010 by abecedarian]



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 10:22 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
Wow. Who would have thought that a less than firm grasp on vocabulary and spelling could lead to confusion over a weapon?

I can just imagine someone brought up on weapons charges for carrying a well displayed uzi around town using the defense of poor vocabulary.

[edit on 18/8/2010 by Chamberf=6]




I knew when I saw the title of the thread, it was going to get interesting..



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 10:22 PM
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One...you should edit your post because as pointed out previously, it is "bear", not "bare".

That said: To bare: to be equipped or furnished with -or-


4 a : to exert influence or force b : apply, pertain —often used with on or upon
— bear a hand : to join in and help out
— bear arms 1 : to carry or possess arms


Other than that Hunka, digging into the understanding of the context of the 18th century and on, nothing much has changed.

Since during the writing of the Constitution, there were no large scale weapons (besides cannons), the general consensus was most likely for a private citizen to be able to arm themselves and possess any type of arms (knives, swords, guns, etc.)



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 10:27 PM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy
...

Since during the writing of the Constitution, there were no large scale weapons (besides cannons), the general consensus was most likely for a private citizen to be able to arm themselves and possess any type of armament (knives, swords, guns, etc.)


Fixed it for you.



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 10:30 PM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


You should of checked the actual text of the Second Amendment.

It's bear arms, not bare arms.

/thread



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by Jean Paul Zodeaux
 


Yes and well regulated simply means that if a group were to muster, a band of citizens, that they cant go out as a mob. They must take in consideration rules of war and the rights of others.



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 11:44 PM
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I think the framer's intentions were clear if observed from the
context of the entire document and the circumstances from
which the document originated.

The intent is to provide for the right of the people to keep and bear arms
for the purpose of protection from tyranny, period.

We too often parse the constitution down to a single word, when it is
a contextual document. It provides for a government "...of the people,
by the people, and for the people." This amendment provides assurance
(by force if necessary) that government remains bound by the
constitution AND in control of "...the people."


"To establish republican government, it is necessary to effect a constitution
in which the will of the nation shall have an organized control over the
actions of its government, and its citizens a regular protection against its
oppressions." --Thomas Jefferson



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 11:49 PM
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"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bare Arms, shall not be infringed."


You must remember that the definitions in this are the definitions of 1776.
A well regulated Militia= the US did not have a standing army/ this is the British term for a local force that defended towns and the colonies from outlaws, Indians, Coup d'état, the french, and the spanish,

The right of the people to keep and bare Arms= the founders wanted a armed(and skilled) people to form Militia units as needed without the need to have a large standing army and to be able to call up a Militia fast before what standing army the US had could ride to the the site of a attack.


ORIGINS OF THE MILITIA AND THE RIGHT TO KEEP ARMS

The Glorious Revolution created the right to keep arms in reaction to James II's policy of neglecting the militia in favor of his army and of disarming the Anglican opponents of his rule. First enunciated in the Declaration of Rights and embodied in the statutory Bill of Rights in 1689, the right to keep arms grew out of the long-standing English concern for protecting the sanctity of property from the arbitrary power of the crown. It also arose from a commitment to the traditional and constitutional forces of the counties, whether in their mode as posse comitatus, as Trained Bands, or as Militia. The ideology of militia and arms, derived from the writings of the Classical Republicans, synthesized by James Harrington, and modified by the "Country" opponents of the "Court" faction in the 1670s and 1680s, provided additional influence for establishing the right to keep arms. These political and ideological activities had an additional significance. They affected the institutional, constitutional, and political concepts and practices of American colonies and revolutionaries in the following century, providing the starting point and partial justification for the creation of the right to bear arms in 1776 and 1789.
ORIGINS OF THE RIGHT TO BEAR ARMS

The right to bear arms— the classical Jus Militiae or right to serve in the army— grew out of the constitutional right to keep arms, the right of self-preservation, and the common law obligation of military and law enforcement service, all in the context of the American Revolution. Thoroughly indoctrinated with the principles of Country ideology and of Natural Rights philosophy, Americans looked to the colonial militia and posse comitatus to provide them with the means of opposing the British army after the occupation of Boston in 1765. When Parliament condemned such measures taken by Bostonians, Patriot reiterated the constitutional right to keep arms. When active military resistance became necessary after 1774, Patriots abandoned the old institutions in favor of a "new militia" of volunteers. When King and Parliament in turn condemned these measures as treasonous, Patriots incorporated the Jus Militiae into their state bills of rights in 1776 as either the right of militia or the right to bear arms, in justification of their revolutionary actions. During the war, the ideological concept of the citizen soldier lost its exclusive identification with the militia: the militia had failed as an effective operational device, compulsory service had been reimposed, and the idea of a citizen army had begun to take shape. The development of this opposing theory had its culmination in the Federal Constitution of 1787 which provided [215] nationalists with the potential to reform the militia into a modernized reserve force and auxiliary to the army. The Antifederalists opponents of consolidated governmental and military power demanded a guarantee in a federal bill of rights of Jus Militiae against potential despotism by the federal "standing army," the ancient nemesis of militia and free government. They got recognition of this right of militia and of arms and arms bearing in the Second Amendment, proposed formally in Congress in 1789 and ratified by the states in 1791.

www.potowmack.org...




[edit on 18-8-2010 by ANNED]



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 11:54 PM
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I don't really care about the peculiars. As long as the bears aren't armed I'm ok with it.

How's that poem about a bearfoot boy go? Cheeks of tan...
Or was it a boyfoot bear?

[edit on 8/18/2010 by Phage]



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 12:12 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
I don't really care about the peculiars. As long as the bears aren't armed I'm ok with it.

How's that poem about a bearfoot boy go? Cheeks of tan...
Or was it a boyfoot bear?
...






posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 01:49 AM
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Originally posted by mal1970
"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bare Arms, shall not be infringed."


As another posted stated correctly it is "bear" arms.

en.wikipedia.org...


A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 01:54 AM
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It is neither bare as in "to expose", or bear as in "to keep or equip thyself".

It loosely translates into, the right to bear arms, as in to keep a pair of dismembered bear arms, such as from a grizzly or kodiak bear. They may be mounted in one's furnished den, as a testament to the freedom of the United States. Any militia shall be proud to be fully equipped with bear arms.

They are a symbol of American pride, but also serve the purpose of being used as suitable weapon. If you grasp a bear arm in each hand, and face the claws out as if they were an extension of your arms, then you will find you are wielding two very powerful weapons. The bear arms can be used to strike, quickly, and menacingly, and the claws with lacerate your opponent righteously so.

I support the 2nd amendment, and will always cherish my right to keep a pair of bear arms.

[edit on 19-8-2010 by SyphonX]



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 02:36 AM
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"Bare arms means your wearing a sleeveless shirt! Bear arms means you are carring a weapon.



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 02:53 AM
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Could be one possible interpretation that's already been stated.

But the title spelling would have to be different.

Mind you they are bare bear arms so perhaps not.

-m0r



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 04:27 AM
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Originally posted by HunkaHunka
What does Bare Arms really mean?




Git 'r done.


TheAssoc.



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 06:17 AM
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reply to post by abecedarian
 


Indeed you did and thank you kind sir/madam.

A balance between working many hours and posting in correct grammar sometimes shows when words are placed into the abyss of the Internet.



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 06:41 AM
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I think you have been ripped enough already for this thread, so I will be easy.

As Kelso would say.......BURNED!!!!!!!!!!!



...He said bare.



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 06:47 AM
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to have and to hold and possess.

like a marriage, till death do you part



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