First Hand account: Florida Beaches Are Polluted With Oil (I was wrong)

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posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:19 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Here's a question for you. Do you really think Obama took a dip in that water? Just asking for your opinion since you've been there. And thanks for posting the videos!




posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by Cloudsinthesky
reply to post by justadood
 


Your math is still wrong.........research what 75% represents


sigh and lol. 75% represents 3/4rs. feel free to 'do the math'

If you have some info, present it.





[edit on 17-8-2010 by justadood]



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:24 PM
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Originally posted by justadood

Originally posted by Cloudsinthesky
Wow, that’s not what you would expect to see from beaches when 75% of the oil has been recovered..



Not that i think the oil is 'gone', but 75% of 200,000+ gallons still leaves 50,000 plus gallons on the beaches and marshes.


In addition, you said 'recovered'.

where has it been said that 75 percent of the oil has been 'recovered'?

Or this this one of those instances where you make the claim, but leave it up to us to 'do the research'?



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:26 PM
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reply to post by justadood
 


Geezz 200 thousand gallons?? Try 205 million gallons or 4.9 million barrels thats the math check



[edit on 17-8-2010 by Cloudsinthesky]



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:27 PM
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Originally posted by black cat
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Here's a question for you. Do you really think Obama took a dip in that water? Just asking for your opinion since you've been there. And thanks for posting the videos!



Take a dip? Maybe. I took a dip today, and so did my kids. It was only after spending a little time there that everything came into focus.

Would I take a public dip, even eat an oyster or two to help save the Gulf Coast economy? SURE! Would I recommend it to someone else or do it again for recreation, HELL NO!

I have been going to the beach a lot this summer because I wasn't sure how bad it would get, and I wanted to know when things took a turn for the worse. That turn was today in my area!



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:34 PM
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Thank you for taking the time to share this.

The video is so disheartening although not unexpected. Have to wonder what the long term effects are going to be... those crabs and snails that have died are some of the lowest rungs on the food chain. As the damage climbs the chain through poisoning and starvation the impact from this really could be devasating, quite likely much worse than it would have been without the dispersants.



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:34 PM
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The fact that they used a percent automatically means they are being uuummm... inaccurate.
To say 75 percent implies they know how much oil leaked, and how much was dispersed, and how much was collected.
In which case they would have a number.
So why express the amount of oil as a percentage then?
Because they don't have a number.
IMHO



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by Scalded Frog
Thank you for taking the time to share this.

The video is so disheartening although not unexpected. Have to wonder what the long term effects are going to be... those crabs and snails that have died are some of the lowest rungs on the food chain. As the damage climbs the chain through poisoning and starvation the impact from this really could be devasating, quite likely much worse than it would have been without the dispersants.


This was my biggest concern when the whole fiasco started. The press will be tired of this and moved on before the real effects are beginning to become apparent. The real devastation will never make the MSM.

First it is the plankton, seaweed, oysters, and other filter fish. Those die or become sterile or toxic. Then the larger wildlife either starves or eats toxic prey. Then it moves right on up the chain until a can of mackeral on the shelf in Michigan has a little of this oil in it. It might take years to move through the food chain and production processes and make it to a store near you, but it is certainly coming!



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:43 PM
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I still maintain that an argument can be made that the beaches are probably the best place for the crude to be.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:43 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready it has taken the oil, broken it down to be almost undetectable, and spread it through the entire Gulf. Sure, it helps make the beaches look cleaner from the aerial shots. It would probably not be noticed by a novice to the beach, because they would take it as normal.


And that is the whole purpose of dispersant.

Oil? What oil?

If one is reluctant to buy into a corporate conspiracy related to the original blowout, surely one must be naive to deny a conspiracy related to rampant use of dispersant.



[edit on 17/8/2010 by kosmicjack]



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:48 PM
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Originally posted by Cloudsinthesky
reply to post by justadood
 


Geezz 200 thousand gallons?? Try 205 million gallons or 4.9 million barrels thats the math check



[edit on 17-8-2010 by Cloudsinthesky]


ahh, nice catch. So, my math was not wrong, i merely foolishly typed thousand instead of million.

Now that we have that petty discrepency aside, and egg is on my face, would you care to answer my initial question, which was (in context, with edit made to correct my typo)):


Originally posted by justadood

Originally posted by Cloudsinthesky
Wow, that’s not what you would expect to see from beaches when 75% of the oil has been recovered..



Not that i think the oil is 'gone', but 75% of 2,000,000+ gallons still leaves 500,000 plus gallons on the beaches and marshes.


So, thanks for pointing out that, even according to 'their' numbers, there is 5 million gallons unaccounted for. Which means we shouldnt be too shocked that there is some found on a beach. Which was my only point. Which you continue to evade responding to.

be well.

[edit on 17-8-2010 by justadood]



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:49 PM
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I don't even really know what to say. That makes me sick to my stomach. I also have an anger management issue with what has happened and the world just seems not to care. Now we have a tremendous amount of fires in Russia. Things are unraveling very fast of late it seems. S&F for this very sad topic. Thank you for the truth.



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:49 PM
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The murky water, dead conch, black seaweed all can be plausible, but the feet digging really show it all how bad it is.

You lose your beach dude, sorry to say that, you'll get it back in...10years maybe.



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:53 PM
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I live south of you on Anna MAria Island.....fortunately we have been spared so far. However, we are waiting for the same thing to happen here. As it is now, we still have squeeky clean white sand, the water is crystal clear and no changes in the wild life on shore. The coquinas are still there, the birds, ghost crabs, blue crabs etc. This weekend is the scallop count for Tampa Bay.....it really is a good way to judge how the waters in our area are doing. Waiting for the results of this. Mote Marine Lab is near us and running submersibles constantly checking the water. The waiting I think is just about as bad.....we don't know if/when this will happen here too........I really feel for you, and all of the other people affected by this.......but saddly, the msm probably will forget all about this as other news attracts their attention.



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by kosmicjack

Originally posted by getreadyalready it has taken the oil, broken it down to be almost undetectable, and spread it through the entire Gulf. Sure, it helps make the beaches look cleaner from the aerial shots. It would probably not be noticed by a novice to the beach, because they would take it as normal.


And that is the whole purpose of dispersant.

Oil? What oil?

If one is reluctant to buy into a corporate conspiracy related to the original blowout, surely one must be naive to deny a conspiracy related to rampant use of dispersant.


I agree Jack.

We don't have a state income tax down here. We don't have much industry except for fishing and logging. Without a booming housing market the logging stops. Without beaches the fishing and tourism stops. Without tourism the tax money stops. Already this year I have seen just about all of the little mom and pop places close up. The real estate market was already hammered, and now it is worse. Without the real estate, restaurants, bars, etc,, then we don't need the support services like daycare, laundry, freight.

It is a vicious, vicious slippery slope, and it all starts with pristine white beaches. We are in a heap of trouble!



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 11:01 PM
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Originally posted by RainCloud
The murky water, dead conch, black seaweed all can be plausible, but the feet digging really show it all how bad it is.

You lose your beach dude, sorry to say that, you'll get it back in...10years maybe.


Yep, I thought the same thing. As we waded and walked I rationalized everything. I have never seen that many Conch or that much seaweed, even during red tide, but I thought it could be explained by the storm, or maybe all the rain had changed the salinity. It happens, just not typically this bad.

When I ran my hand through the sand and left a murky oily hole, that is when my heart sank!

There is no way to rationalize that. Seaweed, silt, dirt, none of that will filter through the sand many feet from the shore. In 10 years, I have never seen a hole on the beach that wasn't crystal clear.

It was also really bothering me that the water wasn't soothing the burn on my leg. I always go to the beach if I have nagging scrapes or burns. It feels good, and it dries it up and heals it quickly. Today it burned a lot, and I couldn't wait to get home and wash it with soap and water and neosporin.



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 11:12 PM
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I'm sorry but I just don't believe that all of what you see is from the oil. The spot you are showing has little to none water flow, hence the sandbars building everywhere. A storm coming in could explain much of the silt and discoloration. The seaweed/plankton gets pushed in and has no place to escape so it degrades into a fine silt as it sits there. My money says that the next big storm will clean it up thouroughly.

It look like a mile north or west the beach is much more in the open sea. Did you see the same things in that location?



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Well, thanks for that getreadyalready. I was already feeling down in the dumps today and that just made it worse.


But seriously, thank you for the taking the time to do the vids.
Star (and if I can work out how to do it) a flag too.

I hope your wife is feeling better. Go cheer her up.

I'm going to go try cheer myself up now.


[edit on 17/8/2010 by Netties Hermit]



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by sligtlyskeptical
 


Yes. Actually, along the coast right there is a very strong parallel current. It appears still because there isn't a lot of wave action. Instead the water is rushing parallel to the beach and around that barrier island into the intracoastal waterway.

Alligator Point is about 1 to 1.5 miles walk up that beach. Alligator Point faces a different direction, it still doesn't have wave action like Panama City, but it has more than Bald Point. At Alligator Point the water was the same color, and the seaweed and Conch shells were similar. I didn't walk out to the water's edge at Alligator Point today, I only saw it from the road as we drove through.

As for silt, it doesn't penetrate the sand. I have camped overnight here at this state park. I have literally been to this beach 1000's of times over the past decade. I have seen some pretty bad red tide episodes. I have seen it closed due to high bacteria in the water. I have come out in 2005 in the middle of a Tropical Storm and surfed. I have never seen the water with a brown tinge or a sub-surface milky texture and appearance. We build sand castles, we bury coolers, we stick umbrellas in the sand, and not once have I ever seen a hole fill in with colored water. No matter how bad the seaweed in the water or on the beach has gotten, you dig a hole 6 inches down, you get perfect crystal clear water.



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by Netties Hermit
 


I will. I am going to drag her to bed now. I will upload the snapshots tomorrow from my better computer.

I hope this thread doesn't die overnight. I want people to see the videos. I, myself, have been a skeptic about oil on the beaches. We had a smell a couple of times, but no oil until today.

I am working a half day again tomorrow. If I can convince my wife, I will go West of here, more toward Apalachicola and Cape San Blas. If all goes well, I might even make it to Panama City. That is about a 2 hour drive though.





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