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Early Winter Coming? ...and Food Shortages?

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posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 08:47 PM
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Originally posted by virraszto
Oh, and something I find really weird is all my volunteer tomato plants look beautiful. I have several volunteers and one of them started growing out of a bag of dirt and in two weeks time went from a seedling to a pretty darn big plant with a nice thick main stem.


Hmmm.

Now that you mention it, so did mine. Of the ten hybrids that I planted, none are doing well, however, my two volunteers are doing great as well as my one heirloom.

Note to Monsanto...




posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 08:51 PM
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Check out wattsupwiththat site : ARCTIC SUMMER COLDEST ON RECORD for 2010. (above the 80° parallel)
The implications of the forthcoming Winter in N Hemisphere are obvious.

mclinking



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 08:55 PM
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from now until Dec 21 2012 things will only get worse. but dont feel down, be happy and try to survive and see how beautiful the world will be in 2013...

(note: this post shouldn't be taken seriously, after all the world could end on dec 21 2012)




posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 09:06 PM
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North of Toronto On the Great Lakes
Summer has been perfect, a little hot /almost decent rain
Tomatoes rocked, blue berries ditto, zukes n'cukes fine, raspberries, blackberries good, lettuce good
good road apples rare, bees RARE, birds rare, herbs looking good but seem a little milder than they should be...

The maples haven't started to turn yet so I am going to say late winter but it might be cold here when it gets here and a little extra sno

awesome sailing days.
fishing ho hum but I haven't tried too hard
OK rainbows last new moon...BBQ-gotta love it.

this is probably a good prognostication
el nino to la nina
www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov...

[edit on 17-8-2010 by Danbones]

[edit on 17-8-2010 by Danbones]



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 09:26 PM
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Hi, just thought I would share some links with you all and see if any of you have experienced some of the same things mentioned in these videos?

www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com...

I wonder how many of the issues we are seeing are related to weather and how many are related to other things?



posted on Aug, 17 2010 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Here in Connecticut it is the same as last year and the 2 before maybe more humid and a little more rain but just about the same the last 3 years.


EDIT: Bees as in wasp may be a little more then normal or im just see (edit: seeing)the damn things everywhere

[edit on 17-8-2010 by GunzCoty]

[edit on 17-8-2010 by GunzCoty]



posted on Aug, 18 2010 @ 06:19 AM
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Hi, I am writing about damage to vegetation.

The kind of symptoms being seen are indeed due to the composition of the atmosphere, but are occurring on a much larger scale than can be explained by the localized spill in the Gulf & corexit.

The foliage of trees of all species, and annual plants as well, exhibit the characteristic symptoms of exposure to toxic greenhouse gas emissions, particularly in the northern hemisphere. Levels of tropospheric ozone are inexorably rising, and it has long been known to be poisonous to vegetation. There are scores of published scientific papers documenting the effects of ozone.

High levels of ozone damage the stomata of leaves and needles, interfering with the ability to uptake CO2, photosynthesize, and produce essential chlorophyll. That is why you see stippling, spots, holes, and discoloration. Ultimately leaves will shrivel up, turn brown, and fall off.

Cumulative exposure over decades has been slowly stunting the growth of trees and causing them to die back. The last two years this process has rapidly accelerated and annual plants and crops have the identical foliar symptoms. I'm not sure why - whether we have reached a tipping point in the saturation, or whether there is some new element.

I have considered the mandated addition of ethanol, which produced peroxyacetyl nitrates, which may react differently than gasoline emissions. Ozone is produced when volatile organic compounds interact with UV radiation - so it's possible that UV radiation has increased, or perhaps cell tower radiation has some role. Also the earth is warming, and more heat = more ozone.

I'm not a scientist so I don't know! Any suggestions are welcome. It's quite difficult to get anyone with expertise or authority to pay attention to this urgent and existential threat - probably because the only solution is a drastic reductions in burning fuel.

Of course, it's also toxic to people, another well-documented fact. When they say thousands die in heat waves in cities - like Paris and Moscow - I have to wonder if it isn't actually the pollution.

I have personally seen and photographed the identical damage to trees and other plants from Seattle to Boston to Costa Rica. www.witsendnj.blogspot.com photos and links scientific research

Gail in New Jersey



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 12:52 PM
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Originally posted by WitsEndNJ
The foliage of trees of all species, and annual plants as well, exhibit the characteristic symptoms of exposure to toxic greenhouse gas emissions, particularly in the northern hemisphere. Levels of tropospheric ozone are inexorably rising, and it has long been known to be poisonous to vegetation. There are scores of published scientific papers documenting the effects of ozone.



Thanks WitsEndNJ.


Did a quick search, and yes, that's what I'm seeing too.

Effects of Ozone Air Pollution on Plants
Impact of ozone on health and vegetation

Interesting note re: snap beans (like my Scarlet Runner Beans?):



Ambient ozone levels in Raleigh, NC suppressed the pod yield of selected snap bean genotypes by as much as 60%, evidence that the ozone sensitivity of snap bean is sufficient to detect effects under real world scenarios.

Assessment of Ambient Ozone Effects on Vegetation Using Snap Bean As a Bio-Indicator Species



...another heatwave starting here. Will watch the pollution levels...



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 02:51 PM
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Catskilll Mountain, New York. Green Beens doing great. Wax Beens didn't do so good. Tomato plants look as if it is early October as does my cucumber plants and mellons. Lettuce did fine but the spinach earlyer didn't do well at all. Herbs are great although the dill and fennel aren't what they usually are.

Then we have the trees which are acting like October. A lot of them are starting to turn and some of them are already dropping there leaves.

The Oak trees are dropping an abundance of acorns. The saying in my neck of the woods that heavy yields of acorns is an indication of a bad winter ahead. Mother nature's way of providing the animals with food for the winter. But, I don't know what will happen to the animals as the acorns are dropping 2-3 months early. I guess they will know what to do.

Lots and Lots of Bumble Bees. Honey Bee are non existant this year.

I am seeing the Bucks with the Does already (male and female deer) this usually does not occur until Mid October as well.

It has been a dry summer but not out of the ordinary for the area so that would not account for browning leaves and acorn drop.

As a matter of fact, yesterday driving home, I drove through one section of road - and thought to myself - check it is still summer isn't it. The road was leaf covered - with colored leafs not just brown dead ones.

Edit: Oh my Peas, All kinds of them (I love fresh peas every way, yum, yum) - Well, :-( I had a very small number of them and they were nothing to speak of (guess that's why I forgot them) - one small picking and that was it and the plants dried up and died.



[edit on 19-8-2010 by Anmarie96]

[edit on 19-8-2010 by Anmarie96]



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 06:49 PM
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Interesting about the trees, I've been wondering what is up with our birch tree. I've been sweeping leaves off the deck since mid July, very unusual. I don't have a veggie garden right now, but flowers have been blooming 2-4 weeks early, less strongly, and for shorter timespans all summer. Almost no honeybees, but the bumble population seems to grow each year. Southeast Iowa. My 80 yr farming neighbor gave up on her extensive veggie garden this year as well - nothing seemed to be thriving at all.

[edit on 19-8-2010 by eeyipes]



posted on Aug, 20 2010 @ 01:00 PM
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WitsEnd's info about the effects of ozone on leaves and plants is good - but I still think winter's coming early here. Only the poplar's are turning and dropping leaves so far, and lots of hummingbirds in my garden over the past few days. Unfortunately, the Scarlet Runner beans have stopped blossoming already, and that's what the hummingbirds really like. ...So the beans are about done, early, and the hummingbirds are migrating a few weeks ahead of schedule too. Suggestive, no?


ED to add PS: a small hummingbird stopped to rest for about a second on a piece of wire fence in my garden this morning - have never seen that before, almost unheard of. Why? Tired?




[edit on 20-8-2010 by soficrow]



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 02:35 AM
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From central New Mexico.
Something is going on, that’s for sure. In New Mexico every other night there are reports on the evening news of black bears in people’s back yards looking for food. This is not normal for New Mexico black bears to come down from the mountains looking for food and water, well at least on this large scale. There are not very much berries, nuts growing or other food they eat. There food is in short supply in the mountains. Summer has been hot from the first week of July to present. Temperatures’ are 90-96 during the day, this is not normal for late August in New Mexico. The rains came late by about 3-4 weeks, and it’s a lot of rain. The normal weather cycle seems to be about 5-weeks off.


Ask yourself, what has had the largest environmental impact across the USA in the last 5 years

Answer. “Ethanol”

This could be the culprit. I read a study on this last year about 30 pages. Sure you can’t see the pollution with ethanol, but it there. It has more effect on the atmosphere than MTBE; it’s just that you can’t see it. It affects the lower atmosphere the most of all pollutants.

What causes this in ethanol you ask. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and aldehyde
To save you some reading here is a short quick reports.

See the section in the article (Pollution Damage to Plants)
Peroxyacl Nitrates (PAN) causes direct damage to leaves of crop plants and trees


Effects of Using Ethanol−Gasoline Fuel Blends.
Effects of using ethanol-Gasoline Fuel Blends
Some good pdf on this site.

Oh, and speaking of large amounts of rain. This is one of the effects of Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and aldehyde. Mostly reported near or at large cities that never had large concentrations of rain. Let’s see, Dallas and Fort Worth are have rain like they never seen before, with temps in the high 90's It also a very large metro area.



[edit on 23-8-2010 by SJE98]

[edit on 23-8-2010 by SJE98]



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 07:36 AM
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Originally posted by SJE98
From central New Mexico.
Something is going on, that’s for sure. ...
Ask yourself, what has had the largest environmental impact across the USA in the last 5 years

Answer. “Ethanol”

This could be the culprit. ...

Effects of Using Ethanol−Gasoline Fuel Blends.
Effects of using ethanol-Gasoline Fuel Blends


Researchers / Writers Conflict of Interest:

* Department of Mineral and Environmental Engineering and Department of Chemistry, New Mexico
* Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico



...large amounts of rain. This is one of the effects of Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and aldehyde. Mostly reported near or at large cities that never had large concentrations of rain. Let’s see, Dallas and Fort Worth are have rain like they never seen before, with temps in the high 90's It also a very large metro area.


Worth checking into further - but do you have any references that aren't funded by mineral and mining interests?



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 10:13 AM
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Central east Saskatchewan, no major cities within 150 miles ( about 250 KM) of me. Rain, like I'v never seen before, and I was raised in Vancouver, known for rain. More rain here than anyone has ever seen. Storms almost every night. It isn't even that warm in the daytime anymore, but still getting lots of thunder and lightning.

I am bringing the herbs into the house now, too cold at night for them. 4 degrees celcius (40 Farenheit) at night now.

The trees aren't really turning color yet, or dropping their leaves, but 2nd year in a row, my Acorn tree (which shouldn't even grow in this cold climate) dropped all its nuts before they started to develop.

Lots of trees that are otherwise healthy are also starting to get little black spots on the leaves. I am in a farmland meets boreal forest area, very little pollution as far as I can tell. No industry near me anywhere.

We have also noticed that when it rains on your truck, the rain now cleans the windshield better than the industrial strength cleaners. That's kind of scary.



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 11:03 AM
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Just tripped over this one...

Northern latitudes are suffering unusual scorching heat waves - and the tropics are freezing!?!

We’re basically in a media blackout (effectively) concerning anything really meaningful, so here’s a snapshot of what’s really going on in the world:


August 9: Katla Volcano, Iceland – Twelve earthquakes in the past 48 hours.
August 9: Deadly Russian Heat Wave Gravest Over Millennium
August 6: Sacramento running 10 degrees below average
August 5: Snow in Brazil, below zero in the River Plate, tropical fish frozen. For a second day running it snowed in Southern Brazil and in twelve of Argentina’s 24 provinces including parts of Buenos Aires.



August 3: Coolest July in San Francisco since 1971
August 3: More than six million fish and thousands of alligators, turtles, dolphins and other river wildlife are floating dead in Bolivian rivers, the cruel aftermath of the extreme cold in South America.



August 3: Argentina colder than Antarctica
August 1: Peru declares state of emergency
August 1: Worst flooding in Pakistan history
July 31: July rainiest month in Mexico history
July 29: Record cold in San Diego
July 10: Record cold at LAX


... Argentina colder than Antarctica 1?!
... six million fish and thousands of alligators, turtles, dolphins and other river wildlife floating dead in Bolivian rivers ! because of the cold !?!



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 12:51 PM
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Northwest and Central Oregon

The leaves are already starting to change and they seem to be changing quickly. It has been unusually cold in the evening during August, at least compared to the last seven years, that is how long I have been up here.

I asked about Watermelons at the local farmer's market, and everyone said there would not be any this year, due to the short growing season and the fact that the nights have been colder than ususal. Summer came very late here, and May seemed more like fall than spring.

Watermelons are a big crop here in Oregon, and I have not seen very many in the stores this year either.

Also, the blackberries are very late this year, and it does not seem like they are going to ripen before it gets too cold. Never remember that, blackberries grow wild around where I live, there are not very many berries to pick this year.



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 01:14 PM
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i prepare for food shortages regardless of current conditions, the hand writting is on the wall as far as i'm concerned. i have laid in stocks of rice- beans- peas -lentils -oats-
nuts -raisins- honey- canned goods- water.. along with other things i consider useful.
I am in total pack rat mode..



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 03:17 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow
... six million fish and thousands of alligators, turtles, dolphins and other river wildlife floating dead in Bolivian rivers ! because of the cold !?!


Remember that that is 'relatively' colder, not perhaps cold as such. The temperature only has to slip a few degrees below the norm to have an adverse effect on cold blooded creatures, as well as lean water-based mammals who have adapted to warm waters. But more importantly the 'cold' will effect whatever these animals feed upon too. If the food chain is broken, these chaps can't go to the shops to stock up. plus if the balance isn't maintained, microbially, the water could be toxic to some degree. Prolonged climate change in these areas will lead to those who can, upping sticks to find better feeding grounds and warmer waters, not all creatures are capable of adapting rapidly enough to survive. Unlike us, unfortunately we too often allow our brains to talk our instinct out of adaptive behaviour.



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by KilgoreTrout

Originally posted by soficrow
... six million fish and thousands of alligators, turtles, dolphins and other river wildlife floating dead in Bolivian rivers ! because of the cold !?!


Remember that that is 'relatively' colder, not perhaps cold as such.



Cold wave kills six million fish in Bolivia


At least six million fish have died in three rivers of Bolivia due to the intense cold wave sweeping through the country in the past few weeks.

The cold wave that gripped the Southern Cone of South America last month caused a severe drop in temperatures in southern and eastern Bolivia, even falling below 0 degrees Celsius.




Unlike us, unfortunately we too often allow our brains to talk our instinct out of adaptive behaviour.


Are you suggesting that 'civilized' humans act like warm-blooded creatures? Ie., like frogs in slowly boiled water?



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow
Are you suggesting that 'civilized' humans act like warm-blooded creatures? Ie., like frogs in slowly boiled water?


It would depend on if there was a respected authority figure to tell us that we had to stay in there for our own good. We often do things that are bad for us, because someone else says we should.




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