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Parents fears school Wi-Fi makes kids sick

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posted on Aug, 15 2010 @ 06:56 PM
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A group of central Ontario parents is demanding their children's schools turn off wireless internet before they head back to school next month, fearing the technology is making the kids sick. Some parents in the Barrie, Ont., area say their children are showing a host of symptoms, ranging from headaches to dizziness and nausea and even racing heart rates.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.

Source: www.cbc.ca...

Sp clueless parents ask to shut down wifi networks without a shred of scientific evidence.

If they are so concerned about the RF radiation, which is pervasive on earth since at least 60 years. Maybe they should make tin foil hats for their children so their brain does not catch those bad RF from TV and radio broadcasts, cell towers, radar systems, electrical wiring, etc.

I wonder if any of those parents uses wireless phones at home?




posted on Aug, 15 2010 @ 06:57 PM
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eh people aren't happy unless they have something to bitch about. you're absolutely right about wireless phones and it don't just stop there. moms and pops hate corded anything these days there are more stuff around the home im sure that is just as dangerous (allegedly)



posted on Aug, 15 2010 @ 07:36 PM
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I live near there.

No idea about the claim, but I have heard it many times.

Good way to get out of school lol.



posted on Aug, 15 2010 @ 09:07 PM
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There is no proof that children benefit from wireless internet over regular internet access.

I hear some schools can't afford toilet paper, but here they are installing wireless internet... It is not as if the schools don't already have broadband.



posted on Aug, 15 2010 @ 09:08 PM
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inb4WiFicausesautism




posted on Aug, 15 2010 @ 09:47 PM
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lol ... all the symptoms can be explained by puberty ... but hey, lets blame wireless, then sue the school to make some money



posted on Aug, 15 2010 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by gagol
 


Some people become sick due to fluorescent lighting. Some become sick due to perfume. Perhaps some people get sick due to wireless signals. Its actually something that is incredibly easy to test scientifically.



posted on Aug, 15 2010 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by truthquest
 


yeah but to say a BUNCH of kids suffer because of that, its just crazy

simple because we live in a world full of wireless signals

some people that have this problem need to live in a freaking BUBBLE,

turning down the wireless in school wouldnt change a bit



posted on Aug, 15 2010 @ 10:03 PM
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I suspect that some students are complaining because they don't like school, and parents don't like to think their own kids can lie and do bad stuff.

The article does not state if the teachers has the same health problems. If they do, it's probably something in the environment of the school that is responsible. BTW wifi operates in the same wavelength as cordless phones, never heard of anyone having problem with that, and you have the antenna inches from your head.



posted on Aug, 16 2010 @ 01:23 AM
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lol what a joke

I hope the parents dont let the kids go to malls as wireless is there, I hope they make them walk in the middle of the road so they far away from the houses with wifi. Oh they should not let the kids be close to ANYONE as most phones have wifi, oh and dont for get the laptops and the business blocks......

Maybe the parents should go back to school so they can learn something.



posted on Aug, 16 2010 @ 01:27 AM
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I bet the majority of these parents will try to cite sources, for their complaint, that they accessed by Googling from their own home WiFi networks.

They'll gain some groundswell support by having their kids initiate a texting campaign.



posted on Aug, 16 2010 @ 01:39 AM
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A Google search reveals that this is a fairly widely discussed notion. The following is an excerpt from one such article:



A staff member who develops shocking headaches after a day in the classroom may be a cliche. But this is what happened to Michael Bevington, a classics teacher at top independent school Stowe, in Buckinghamshire, after wi-fi was installed in his classroom.


Source

[edit on 8/16/2010 by NJE03]



posted on Aug, 16 2010 @ 01:42 AM
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Oh, I have wireless brain freeze. Please, those people looking for attention as there's no such as health risk with wireless. I have been living in a house with wifi for over 10 years and my sickness come from damn people who didn't cover their mouth.

If their kids go sick, then the highest percent that they got sickness through touch, cough, sneeze, few people drink with same bottle, making out, etc. Zero from wifi!



posted on Aug, 16 2010 @ 04:43 AM
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Originally posted by Hefficide

I bet the majority of these parents will try to cite sources, for their complaint, that they accessed by Googling from their own home WiFi networks.




Hmm, a majority you say?

Would you be willing to bet your soul?

If so and you truly wish to bet, you have twenty four hours to prove that a majority of the parents involved in this case used wi-fi to find out about the health-effects of wi-fi.

You aren't lying when you say you want to make a bet are you?


*If you win, think how satisfying it will be.



posted on Aug, 16 2010 @ 04:57 AM
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Originally posted by gagol
I suspect that some students are complaining because they don't like school, and parents don't like to think their own kids can lie and do bad stuff.

I could easily see this being a kind of "spontaneous conspiracy" among the kids:

Kid A: I don't feel good. I wanna stay home today
Kid B: Me too.
Kid C-kid Z: Me too! Me too!

Maybe without even realizing it, they discovered that when they all act together they can get the town to freak out...kids are sly that way...they like attention and "drama"...and then the ones who aren't "getting sick" feel left out and lo and behold, symptoms develop...

That's basically how the Salem Witch Trials happened, remember...

That said, I think there hasn't been enough valid reasearch into the knock-on effects of all this ambient wireless radiation floating around, so who knows?



posted on Aug, 16 2010 @ 05:02 AM
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reply to post by Exuberant1
 


I'm actually flattered!

You put a lot more thought into that reply than I put into my original, satirical post!

As for becoming literal about the word "majority"... Well, no, I wouldn't bet. But as for the concept that these folks are probably utilizing many of the same technologies, at home, as they are worried about the school having?

Yes I would bet this to be true.



posted on Aug, 16 2010 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by NJE03
A Google search reveals that this is a fairly widely discussed notion. The following is an excerpt from one such article:



A staff member who develops shocking headaches after a day in the classroom may be a cliche. But this is what happened to Michael Bevington, a classics teacher at top independent school Stowe, in Buckinghamshire, after wi-fi was installed in his classroom.


Source

[edit on 8/16/2010 by NJE03]


Comments from the site:

I think it's a load of scaremongering with uncertainties and coincidences. Denmark has completed the largest survey of mobile phones and cancer rates over 20 years with tens of thousands of people. And the findings - no significant measurable difference. Wi-fi uses much less powerful signals than mobile phones. Do the maths people.
Scott Andrews, Colwyn Bay, UK

I used to get intense headaches at work all the time. I attributed it to mobile phones at first, and had I heard of this scare I would have also suggested wi-fi. It turned out it was due to drinking any diet/light drink with sweetener!
Sam Hatoum, London

Whilst working in a school last year, I had similar symptoms to Michael Bevington but on a much larger scale. After months in observation in hospital and numerous tests, my symptoms were explained to be a serious muscular convergence insufficiency of the eyes and a diplopia. Apparently many people who suffer from migraines, or regular and severe headaches, may have these conditions but as opticians and doctors do not normally test for these conditions, most of the public are unaware of them. The pain of such headaches can increase if not dealt with and can be serious to the point that at times the patient nears unconsciousness. These headaches which arise from the conditions named above are often blamed on fluorescent lights and radiation.
David Pattle, London, UK

I'm currently sitting in a university library peppered with wi-fi transmitters. The university has some 17,000 students all of whom use the library at some point or another. I have yet to see or hear of anyone complaining of headaches when using the building.
Charles Levine, Glasgow, Scotland

If this was scaremongering and coincidences then why did all the major mobile phone distributors bring out a radiation protector to slot into the ear piece, obviously there is some sort of danger, put no one can prove just how much.
Damien McCourt, Belfast

Ten or 12 years ago people claimed to be suffering similar symptoms, the culprit then was the ozone emissions from laser printers. Nearly 30 years ago the major Bank I worked for was prepared to provide lead aprons(!) for their male employees concerned at being exposed to these new fangled computers. There appears to be a tipping point and when "new" technology becomes commonplace such health concerns seem to evaporate.
Anne Robins, Guildford, UK



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 03:37 PM
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Ughh, more stupid Americans blaming their health problems on idiotic unproven theories instead of just taking responsibilities for themselves...

OH WAIT. The story's from Canada?
Maybe it's not just us after all



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 04:03 PM
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Everything I have read about this indicates that the people moaning the loudest are either hypochondriacs or outright liars. Most commercial routers (the things you use at home) don't even exceed 2% of the maximum power output permitted by the FCC. If there was a shred of truth to these claims it wouldn't be cropping up in a hand full of places like this but all over the world as we are awash in not only microwave-band 802.11x signals but cell phone (also microwave band) FM/AM transmissions and plenty of other spurious signals coming from pretty much every direction



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