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Weather on Mars - Where is the Rover photo evidence?

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posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 01:42 AM
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I want to ask you all about the weather on Mars.

Where is the evidence seen in Rover pictures that supports the view that the weather is harsh? On Mars, there is water in the atmosphere and there is ice a few inches beneath the surface. The temperatures are supposed to be low enough to operate the freeze/thaw mechanism.

On Earth we have the freeze/thaw mechanism that , over time, creates a pile of rubble at the base of cliffs. It cracks huge boulders in half and reduces them to very much smaller pieces. Mars has had many many years for this to happen - if it was going to happen.

We are told there are big sand storms and dust devils, but there is no evidence in the photographs to show a build-up of small wind-blown dust and debris around the bases of rocks, and in places out of the wind. There is no evidence of a wind eroding the sand from near the base of rocks like we have here on Earth. Normally, there is a leeward side and a windward side to most large and small rocks, but on Mars, there is no evidence to show any kind of wind erosion at all - particularly from high powered winds that are supposed to blow. The pictures of the Rovers do not show much dust, although we are told that there is a buildup and an occasional magical 'cleansing'.

We have all seen the movies of dust devils and we are told about sand storms, but... visual evidence?

Maybe you can help my understanding of this by pointing to some Rover pictures which show localised weathering. I have seen evidence for larger outcrops of rock which could be described as due to weathering, but it is the localised small scale weathering which I am not seeing in the Rover pictures I have studied.

Any ideas please?




posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 01:49 AM
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Not that I'm claiming any kind of conspiracy or anything, but as far as the weather goes, I personally found it interesting that so many rocks had such sharp edges.

I mean, I know there's plenty of weather on Mars. Sandstorms plenty. But after a billion years or so of being blown by even tiny bits of dust, you'd think you'd see a lot more smoothness to the surface features.

Just an observation.



posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 02:14 AM
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So what are you suggesting here?

That there isn't harsh weather on Mars?

Or that there isn't any weather on Mars at all?

This looks pretty weathery to me:



[edit on 14/8/10 by Chadwickus]



posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 02:46 AM
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hey qman, tough crowd here dude.



posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 03:25 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
So what are you suggesting here?

That there isn't harsh weather on Mars?

Or that there isn't any weather on Mars at all?

This looks pretty weathery to me:



[edit on 14/8/10 by Chadwickus]

cool, never seen it before!



posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 08:13 AM
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Thank you for the movie of the 'dust devil' but I dont believe them. There is no evidence to show that they are there except movies.

This kind of question is bound to bring out the disinfo boys, and will be like a magnet to them, they will all gather around and back each other up. Well, boys, come up with the goods or keep quiet.

I am not saying there is a conspiracy, but you have to agree, that it is unusual for there to be virtually NO examples in Rover photographs. So, I AM asking a question. Where is the evidence in Rover pictures of localised weathering of rocks ?

If the harsh weather exists, then there should be plenty of evidence all around. After all, the environment has been there long enough to have worn all the edges smooth, and to show lots of weathering examples.

There are movies of dust devils and we are told of the harsh conditions. So... prove it by showing examples. Not just 1 or possibly 2, but maybe 5 or a decent number. Earth has been weathered, so why not Mars?

If I can see examples, then I am quite happy to admit that I was wrong in my assupmtions.



posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 


Are you perhaps skirting around the idea that Mars has at some time in the last 150000 earth years suffered a violent cataclysm that has resulted in lots of strewn about sharp edged rocks.

Would the thinner Martian atmosphere be able to carry as much dust as fast as Earths can, if not weathering would be slower but imho still more evident than it appears to be. I also am not hinting at a conspiracy, just that we are right near the bottom of our Martian learning curve.



posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 08:50 AM
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I have my own theories about sharp-edged and flat-faced rocks but I wont bore you all at the moment :-)

Would the thinner Martian atmosphere be able to carry as much dust as fast as Earths can, if not weathering would be slower but imho still more evident than it appears to be. .

That may be true, I dont know, but even a thin atmosphere should ba able to carry small pieces of dust and deposit them near rocks to build up a (very) small sand dune (for want of a better phrase) in the trailing edges of all the rocks. It should also be able to have enough force to whip out from under the leading edge of rocks particles of sand and leave a dip there at the base. This is the kind of thing I would expect to see more often when we have these fast winds blowing around. Dont forget the general lack of freeze/thaw weathering too which we have to account for.



posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 09:17 AM
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I have my own theories about sharp-edged and flat-faced rocks but I wont bore you all at the moment :-)

Would the thinner Martian atmosphere be able to carry as much dust as fast as Earths can, if not weathering would be slower but imho still more evident than it appears to be. .

That may be true, I dont know, but even a thin atmosphere should ba able to carry small pieces of dust and deposit them near rocks to build up a (very) small sand dune (for want of a better phrase) in the trailing edges of all the rocks. It should also be able to have enough force to whip out from under the leading edge of rocks particles of sand and leave a dip there at the base. This is the kind of thing I would expect to see more often when we have these fast winds blowing around. Dont forget the general lack of freeze/thaw weathering too which we have to account for.




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