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NHS to launch 'intelligent' pill with edible microchip...

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posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 04:26 PM
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NHS to launch 'intelligent' pill with edible microchip...


www.dailymail.co.uk

Heart patients are to test the ultimate 'smart' pill - an edible microchip that delivers information about their body direct to a mobile phone.

Around 40 people are being recruited by NHS doctors to take standard versions of their heart pills fitted with a microchip.

The chips in the pills send signals to a patch attached to the patient's shoulder, which relays a text message to a mobile or hand-held device if they have forgotten to take their medication.
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 13/8/2010 by PuterMan]




posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 04:26 PM
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Quite apart from the fact that there is absolutely NO way I would have anything to do with this I have to question the veracity of their pilot test.

They are saying that the uptake of pills went from 30% to 80% !!


The system, called Raisin, was initially tested in the US where it improved the level of compliance of patients taking their pills from 30 per cent to 80 per cent.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Are they really saying that so few took their heart medication? Frankly I don't believe it.

The other suggestions in the article raise a spectre of RFID chip control that I will have nothing to do with.


www.dailymail.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 13/8/2010 by PuterMan]



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 04:50 PM
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Originally posted by PuterMan
Are they really saying that so few took their heart medication? Frankly I don't believe it.


It's hard to know without a link to the US study, which the Daily Mail didn't give, but I would think it would depend on how they define "compliance".

In other words, non-compliance could be something as simple as not taking the pills according to schedule, something I know that I have enormous trouble doing reliably without some sort of reminder. If the efficacy of the medication requires it to be taken at a precise time of day (or precise intervals), I can easily see 80% of people being "non-compliant" on that level. It's not that they never took their heart medication, it's that they skipped doses or took them later than recommended, would be my guess.



 
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