Canadians overly sensitive, Brits warned

page: 5
24
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join

posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 10:56 PM
link   
reply to post by Aeons
 


I'll take you at your word, even though my personal experience of 2 full summer's worth of Backpacking Europe proved otherwise to me.

Don't get me wrong we still had great times together, but I distinctly felt very "apart" from my Canadian brother and sisters, unlike how I do over here in the States or Canada with them. Overall, they were some of the initially most unfriendly backpackers to Americans. This is coming from someone on a border town who travels to Canada frequently. In Europe, I felt very separated from Canada, whereas other countries backpackers were very friendly from the get go. It was very weird and sad, that's all I say on that.




posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 10:57 PM
link   
reply to post by Unity_99
 


Texans? They're the best. You want to start a fist-fight with a Texan? Just tell him Ontario is bigger than Texas (true). They're programmed to believe Texas is the biggest state in the union, so nothing can possibly be bigger than it. They'll fight to the death on pride on that point.

But then give him a big high five...he's one of the best kind of Yanks and he's alright in my books.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:00 PM
link   
reply to post by pavil
 


I believe you. I think it is something that isn't intended that way. Its....we are actually pretty introverted as a society. Friendly without being inviting I think it is. Very mind-your-own business.

It seems to be very confusing to many other cultures. It is also one of the things that makes us most aware of how we aren't like the USA in real life interactions.

Think of it as a cross between Chinese reservedness and Victorian reservedness with a smidgen of French aloofness thrown in for good measure.

[edit on 2010/8/11 by Aeons]



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by LookingIn
But then give him a big high five...he's one of the best kind of Yanks and he's alright in my books.


Be careful who you call "Yank". There's that little thing called the Mason/Dixon line. Just saying.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:02 PM
link   
reply to post by Aeons
 


I thought that was just a Toronto thing. I never put the Asian influence together with that. Makes sense.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:03 PM
link   

Originally posted by LookingIn
reply to post by Unity_99
 


Texans? They're the best. You want to start a fist-fight with a Texan? Just tell him Ontario is bigger than Texas (true). They're programmed to believe Texas is the biggest state in the union, so nothing can possibly be bigger than it. They'll fight to the death on pride on that point.

But then give him a big high five...he's one of the best kind of Yanks and he's alright in my books.



But we're not in the union,eh?!!!!
Have to admit he had a nice velvet drawl, sex appeal.

[edit on 11-8-2010 by Unity_99]



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by pavil
reply to post by Aeons
 


I thought that was just a Toronto thing. I never put the Asian influence together with that. Makes sense.


There has been one or more Chinese families in just about every town in Canada since founding. You can't stop in some small town in the middle of flat-land nowhere without a multi-generation Chinese family in it.

In Canada, no farmer must live without a local Chinese restaurant. No matter how remote!



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by Aeons

Think of it as a cross between Chinese reservedness and Victorian reservedness with a smidgen of French aloofness thrown in for good measure.


Ha. They weren't the icebreakers when meeting them backpacking, after a beer a two everything was fine. Beer is the ultimate diplomatic tool. Especially Sleeman's Cream Ale .....mmmmmm.

[edit on 11-8-2010 by pavil]



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:08 PM
link   

Originally posted by intrepid

Originally posted by LookingIn
But then give him a big high five...he's one of the best kind of Yanks and he's alright in my books.


Be careful who you call "Yank". There's that little thing called the Mason/Dixon line. Just saying.



..yeah was actually getting ready to type it, but i chose to refresh and here i seen you posted it.




posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:08 PM
link   
I have to admit, I could never tell the difference between the Canadian and American accents, although I slowly am starting to notice it. But in fairness, most of my American friends I yahoo voice chat with can't tell the difference between North and South England (there is a hell of a difference) and in some cases they can't distinguish between English and Australian, and that is just as different as American is to English, but I do struggle noticing the difference between New Zealand and Australia.

Mad thing is though, I can easily tell the difference between north and south USA, I can tell if someones from New York easily too.

No mistaking the Scots or Irish though, regardless of where you are from :-p

[edit on 11/8/10 by woogleuk]



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:09 PM
link   
reply to post by Aeons
 


Don't forget the Koreans. Damn fine people as well. Hard as hell workers too. I used to say, "If you want a good worker, get one from Down East." Until I worked with the Asians. Now substitute Down east for Far east. Strong, proud, dedicated people. A HUGE boon to our culture.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:13 PM
link   


reply to post by Aeons
 

There has been one or more Chinese families in just about every town in Canada since founding. You can't stop in some small town in the middle of flat-land nowhere without a multi-generation Chinese family in it.

In Canada, no farmer must live without a local Chinese restaurant. No matter how remote!


That's so true. I am close to a few of the smallest Saskatchewan communities, and every one of them has a Chinese restaurant. Not very good ones, but there they are.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:15 PM
link   
reply to post by jerico65
 


And they end their sentences in "eh"



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:17 PM
link   
reply to post by tristar
 


Yes! Mea Culpa there.

Texans ain't Yanks and that's a good call on my "up north" stupidity.

Texans are the best kind of Americans, and I still have their back if they need it.

: )



[edit on 11-8-2010 by LookingIn]



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by SCRUFF
And they end their sentences in "eh"


Not all sentence but true. Even highly educated Canadians. We do it without thinking. It's like some countries that put ",no?" at the end of their sentences.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:21 PM
link   
reply to post by woogleuk
 




No mistaking the Scots or Irish though, regardless of where you are from :-p


LOL, went to a Scottish wedding once here in Canada, the groomsmen were in full kilts and regalia. Some dough-head from the bride's side declared - "I didn't know the groom was Polish!"

"Shot to the heart, and you're to blame, you give love a bad name."

Yeah, you can mistake the Scots for others sometimes!



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:21 PM
link   

Originally posted by intrepid

Originally posted by SCRUFF
And they end their sentences in "eh"


Not all sentence but true. Even highly educated Canadians. We do it without thinking. It's like some countries that put ",no?" at the end of their sentences.


As many also put the "umm" in between sentences for no apparent reason.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:23 PM
link   
*sigh* The Corporation of Canada or the Corporation of America? We're both ruled by politicos we barely had say in voting in, don't listen to us after they get their claws in power, ruled by puppetmasters who force them to deceive us, and somehow we're content to rant on about the differences in the bread and circuses we enjoy across our semi-artificial border. I can't see the current sense in a single nationalistic point of bravado ... this certainly isn't the country I'd once hoped it was, and I sure a heck wouldn't design this onerous system of land-rapers and capitolist insanity for my countrymen and women. How about dismantling them both, imprisoning the criminal governance, and having no borders? That would be more like it.

Thanks for answering that troll-nazi well Slayer.



defenderpublishing.blogspot.com...



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by pavil

Originally posted by Aeons

Think of it as a cross between Chinese reservedness and Victorian reservedness with a smidgen of French aloofness thrown in for good measure.


Ha. They weren't the icebreakers when meeting them backpacking, after a beer a two everything was fine. Beer is the ultimate diplomatic tool. Especially Sleeman's Cream Ale .....mmmmmm.

[edit on 11-8-2010 by pavil]


Oh, and most of the Native tribes in Canada - their cultures are often cool and restrained too.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:27 PM
link   
reply to post by tristar
 


Just out of interest, is Kermit the frog Canadian? Serious question, lol. Like I said I am starting to notice the difference, and I have his voice running through my head, and that ummm bit strikes a chord. (no I don't hear Kermits voice in my head on a regular basis, before anyone asks, lmao)





new topics
top topics
 
24
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join


Off The Grid with Jesse Ventura and AboveTopSecret.com Partner Up to Stay Vigilant
read more: Ora.TV's Off The Grid with Jesse Ventura and AboveTopSecret.com Partner Up to Stay Vigilant