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Bermuda Triangle Mystery Solved?

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posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 07:30 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by LiveForever8
reply to post by network dude
 


Some points regarding Flight 19:


In 1945, though, planes flying over water had to depend on knowing their starting point, how long and fast they had flown, and in what direction. If a pilot made a mistake with any of these figures, he was lost. Over the ocean there were no landmarks to set him right.





For some reason Taylor apparently thought the flight had started out in the wrong direction and had headed south toward the Keys, instead of east. This thought was to color his decisions throughout the rest of the flight with deadly results.



I don't get this. Taylor thought he flew south.. over land not water.. how could he Not Know?.. all he had to do was fly low enough to see land and know he was still over Florida.

If Taylor was lost at sea, how do we even know he thought he flew in this direction?



posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by KingAtlas
 


Im gonna have to agree with this poster.

Gas would not make compasses go wacko and give bad radio signals all of a sudden etc.

I think there is more going on at the Bermuda Triangle than meets the eye.



posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 06:07 PM
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reply to post by LiveForever8
 


I've seen a lot of documentaries on this subject, even this one before, and even through quite convincing, it doesn't take into the effect of where the ships and most of all aircraft went to; especially the military squadron that vanished w/o a trace and the tail ID of the aircraft that are in the triangle are NOT the ones that vanished and are not the same type at all.

the Hydrogen effect is definitely possible, but, really doesn't account for the missing craft.



posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by Komodo
 


I don't see how it doesn't account for the missing boats - they would have sunk without a trace - easy.

As for the aircraft:


As one of Taylor's colleagues noted, "...they didn't call those planes 'Iron Birds' for nothing. They weighed 14,000 pounds empty. So when they ditched, they went down pretty fast."
- from previous post.

They too, sunk. It's not a big mystery at all.



posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 06:35 PM
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I saw a good arguement that basically you can put a triangle anywhere on the planet. Ships and planes go missing...period.



posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Yep, the BT does not hold a monopoly on air/sea disasters/disappearances, not by a long way.



posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 06:48 PM
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In my opinion, there is a portal to another dimension/universe in the Bermuda Triangle.
2nd line.

[edit on 12-8-2010 by sphinx551]



posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by sphinx551
In my opinion, there is a portal to another dimension/universe in the Bermuda Triangle.
2nd line.

[edit on 12-8-2010 by sphinx551]


Based on what evidence?



posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 07:14 PM
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Odly enough there was a documentary on this in england a few days ago on channel 5 called "bermuda triangle revealed" and it told of a recent story about a man flying a small cesna plane through the triangle. While in the air he said the clouds rolled around him and when the clouds broke (after about 20 mins)he was 2000 miles away. this was all confirmed by various sources and meant his 200mph plane must have travelled at 2000mph. my numbers may be slightly off but i remember the 2k mph part. even the experts were saying time travel happened however my theory was that he somehow got cought in a sideways tornado (the explanation for raining fish and other weird objects)i will try and get a vid up tomorow.



posted on Aug, 12 2010 @ 08:15 PM
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vile vortices

that is all



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 12:42 PM
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By no means am I an expert on the BT, and therefore probably should keep my trap shut.. As for the Magnetic anomalies and the methane gas, I do not know, however, I do understand that this entire area is one of the most heavily traveled, just the shear numbers of various crafts certainly has something to do with the frequency. For instance, a busy interstate in the DFW metroplex will certainly have more accidents and collisions than say, a lonely country road less traveled... just a thought, I'll stay out of it know...



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by caucazoid69
 


You are absolutely correct


The area is one of the most heavily traveled shipping lanes in the world, with ships crossing through it daily for ports in the Americas, Europe, and the Caribbean Islands. Cruise ships are also plentiful, and pleasure craft regularly go back and forth between Florida and the islands. It is also a heavily flown route for commercial and private aircraft heading towards Florida, the Caribbean, and South America from points north.


When the UK Channel 4 television program "The Bermuda Triangle" (c. 1992) was being produced by John Simmons of Geofilms for the Equinox series, the marine insurer Lloyd's of London was asked if an unusually large number of ships had sunk in the Bermuda Triangle area. Lloyd's of London determined that large numbers of ships had not sunk there. - en.wikipedia.org...


Also, Lloyd's of London do not change their insurance policy for any ships traversing the BT region - there is no significance to the area being their reason.



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 03:39 PM
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Originally posted by LiveForever8
reply to post by Komodo
 


I don't see how it doesn't account for the missing boats - they would have sunk without a trace - easy.

As for the aircraft:


As one of Taylor's colleagues noted, "...they didn't call those planes 'Iron Birds' for nothing. They weighed 14,000 pounds empty. So when they ditched, they went down pretty fast."
- from previous post.

They too, sunk. It's not a big mystery at all.


no big mystery eh ?? well.. then you debunk this.. cuz' .. the military has yet..that we know of..






posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 03:42 PM
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Originally posted by baldybill
Odly enough there was a documentary on this in england a few days ago on channel 5 called "bermuda triangle revealed" and it told of a recent story about a man flying a small cesna plane through the triangle. While in the air he said the clouds rolled around him and when the clouds broke (after about 20 mins)he was 2000 miles away. this was all confirmed by various sources and meant his 200mph plane must have travelled at 2000mph. my numbers may be slightly off but i remember the 2k mph part. even the experts were saying time travel happened however my theory was that he somehow got cought in a sideways tornado (the explanation for raining fish and other weird objects)i will try and get a vid up tomorow.


IMO, a sideways Tornado would have ripped the Cessna apart like a toothpick



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by LiveForever8
Step aside outer space aliens, time anomalies, submerged giant Atlantean pyramids and bizarre meteorological phenomena ... the "Triangle" simply suffers from an acute case of gas.


I have two tapes from Pastor Roland Gardner and he puts the Bermuda Triangle and the Bible together. Very interesting stuff.

[edit on 8/13/2010 by texastig]



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by Komodo
 


I begrudgingly watched the videos and am completely unable to fathom what it is I am to debunk. Do you want me to debunk the strange 'pulsating' feeling that the sound technician felt? Or perhaps the faulty engine on their boat? Maybe even the crappy exploration/navigational skills of some of the 'investigators'?

I find that I can spend 30 minutes (sometimes and hour) watching shows like the one you linked without ever learning anything of value. It was an awful 'investigation' and proved nothing at all.



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 04:47 PM
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To me the methane theory doesn't seem very plausible unless you have lots of methane bubbles coming up all the time in that region. What are the odds that a random fairly rare large enough bubble to sink a ship just happens to come up right underneath?



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 04:52 PM
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Originally posted by baldybill
Odly enough there was a documentary on this in england a few days ago on channel 5 called "bermuda triangle revealed" and it told of a recent story about a man flying a small cesna plane through the triangle. While in the air he said the clouds rolled around him and when the clouds broke (after about 20 mins)he was 2000 miles away. this was all confirmed by various sources and meant his 200mph plane must have travelled at 2000mph. my numbers may be slightly off but i remember the 2k mph part. even the experts were saying time travel happened however my theory was that he somehow got cought in a sideways tornado (the explanation for raining fish and other weird objects)i will try and get a vid up tomorow.


I believe it was 200m in 20 min, which is 600mph. I think he said 2000kmh, which is not anywhere near 2000mph. His small one engine prop plane was not capable of those speeds.

This was an old documentary. Unfortunately his plane did not have a transponder and there were no witnesses.

He reported that he flew through what appeared to be a tunnel in the clouds. He was in it for approximately 20 min and emerged 200 miles further on the same course. His watch was off by 15 min. when he arrived in Florida. He did not notice the change in location until he arrived to his destination 20 min earlier than he should have and only retroactively realized what he thought had happened.

ATC said he may have had a strong tail wind the whole way and his watch may have been wrong from the get go.

I dont think there is such a thing as a horizontal tornado.



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by LiveForever8
reply to post by Komodo
 


I begrudgingly watched the videos and am completely unable to fathom what it is I am to debunk. Do you want me to debunk the strange 'pulsating' feeling that the sound technician felt? Or perhaps the faulty engine on their boat? Maybe even the crappy exploration/navigational skills of some of the 'investigators'?

I find that I can spend 30 minutes (sometimes and hour) watching shows like the one you linked without ever learning anything of value. It was an awful 'investigation' and proved nothing at all.


so .. the magnetic annomoly wasn't of any interest of you .. ok .. well.. I highly suggest you go out there yourself and do the same investigation as they did..

I'll indulge you a bit since you seem you have completely missed the point.. and have no knowledge of the BT

~Magnetic anomalies, meaning compasses will not read True North and spin..

~batteries go dead or entire engines go out for no reason ..
~Missing person's .. which was in the VIDEO i posted if you really actually VIEWED the video.. yea.. multiple witnesses
~missing military a/c and entire ships.........never to be found..

so .. let me bring you up to date a bit on this subject since your in the dark about it and don't quite have an eye for the oddness of the subject..


Perhaps the most famous disappearance in the Triangle was that of Flight 19. The Saga began on December 15th, 1945 when five Avenger torpedo bombers lifted off from the Navel Air Station at Fort Lauderdale.

The flight was meant to be a practice bombing run for thirteen students and a Commander, Lt. Charles Taylor. About an hour and a half into the flight had left; a transmission was picked up by Taylor. He indicated that his compasses were not behaving properly, but he believed himself to be over the Florida Keys (islands south of the Florida mainland).

The flight coordinator urged him to fly north toward Miami if he was sure of his location to the south of Florida. Due to the lack of global positioning technology or other location-tracking devices, Taylor had to rely on the compass; and since it was acting strangely, he became confused as to his real location.

Taylor began flying northeast toward where he thought was the Naval Air Station, but he never returned in time, which brought speculation that he may have flown off course-to the northeast of Florida. The communications between Flight 19 and the mainland weakened, and as time went on, snatches of transmissions were received indicating that the other flight 19 pilots-the students-were attempting to persuade Taylor to change course.

“If we could just fly west”, one of the students said to another, “we are sure to get home.” He was right, because at 5:50 P.M. that day, the Com Gulf Sea Frontier Evaluation Center managed to get a fix on Flight 19’s weakening signals. They were apparently east of New Smyrna Beach, Florida, but the communications were so poor that this information could not be passed on to the lost planes.

Searches were made for the lost planes, but to no avail. A PBM Mariner plane with a thirteen-man crew was sent out to search for the fliers, and it too never returned.
source




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