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Google CEO Schmidt: No Anonymity Is The Future Of Web

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posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by SupremeKnowledge
 


No, Windows Cardspace is a software that is used to identify you on the internet.

Here is a link to what it is-msdn.microsoft.com...

Short snippet-



Understanding Digital Identity

Who are you? It's a simple question, but it doesn't have a simple answer. The way you represent your identity changes as you move through the world. When you present your passport at an airport's Immigration Desk, you're a citizen of some country. When you show your driver's license to a policeman who's stopped you for speeding, you're a legal driver who resides in some locality. When you use your credit card to pay for a best-selling novel at a bookstore, you're a customer with a particular account number. Different contexts require different identities, each of which is expressed in a different way and provides different information.

All of these contexts have well-understood ways for you to establish your identity. Yet, in one very important context—the networked world—identity is currently a much more muddled thing. Just as in the physical world, all of us have a variety of digital identities, and they're expressed in different ways. Today, however, there's no consistent way to deal with this portfolio of digital identities. Instead, we're left struggling in a complex, confusing, and insecure environment.

Yet different kinds of digital identities will always be necessary—no single identity will suffice. And the reality is that these identities will always be provided by a range of different sources—no single identity provider will suffice, either. This means that the solution is not to mandate a single system for digital identity, but rather to find a coherent way to use multiple digital identity systems. What's required is a system of systems—a metasystem—focused on identity.

Making this identity metasystem a reality requires cooperation. No single organization can unilaterally impose a solution. Fortunately, vendor-neutral communication standards exist that can be used to address this issue. Based on SOAP and XML, these standards include WS-Security, WS-Trust, WS-MetadataExchange, and WS-SecurityPolicy. Using these Web services technologies, it's possible to define a consistent way to work with any digital identity created by any source, using any identity technology.


They are already working on systems to make it possible that you cannot spoof who you are.

This came out awhile ago.




posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by Tyrannyispeace
reply to post by SupremeKnowledge
 


No, Windows Cardspace is a software that is used to identify you on the internet.

Here is a link to what it is-msdn.microsoft.com...

Short snippet-



Understanding Digital Identity

Who are you? It's a simple question, but it doesn't have a simple answer. The way you represent your identity changes as you move through the world. When you present your passport at an airport's Immigration Desk, you're a citizen of some country. When you show your driver's license to a policeman who's stopped you for speeding, you're a legal driver who resides in some locality. When you use your credit card to pay for a best-selling novel at a bookstore, you're a customer with a particular account number. Different contexts require different identities, each of which is expressed in a different way and provides different information.

All of these contexts have well-understood ways for you to establish your identity. Yet, in one very important context—the networked world—identity is currently a much more muddled thing. Just as in the physical world, all of us have a variety of digital identities, and they're expressed in different ways. Today, however, there's no consistent way to deal with this portfolio of digital identities. Instead, we're left struggling in a complex, confusing, and insecure environment.

Yet different kinds of digital identities will always be necessary—no single identity will suffice. And the reality is that these identities will always be provided by a range of different sources—no single identity provider will suffice, either. This means that the solution is not to mandate a single system for digital identity, but rather to find a coherent way to use multiple digital identity systems. What's required is a system of systems—a metasystem—focused on identity.

Making this identity metasystem a reality requires cooperation. No single organization can unilaterally impose a solution. Fortunately, vendor-neutral communication standards exist that can be used to address this issue. Based on SOAP and XML, these standards include WS-Security, WS-Trust, WS-MetadataExchange, and WS-SecurityPolicy. Using these Web services technologies, it's possible to define a consistent way to work with any digital identity created by any source, using any identity technology.


They are already working on systems to make it possible that you cannot spoof who you are.

This came out awhile ago.

I doubt anyone would download their program...

[edit on 10-8-2010 by SupremeKnowledge]



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 02:17 PM
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And the plot thickens....

Seriously, we can't go more than 4 hours without some breaking story about a greedy ass company pushing for more and more profit. This is getting very tiresome. Nice find.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 02:22 PM
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Hey do you sppose when they talk about all this transparency on the net they mean for themselves as well? Ha! I crack myself up. You can bet your bottom dollar that all this non-privacy talk only applies to all of us. The "elite" aka corporatist/fascist rich folk and politicians will still have all the privacy they have now.

This is ridiculous, I guess I'll have to add surfing the net to flying as another thing I refuse to do anymore because of the loss of privacy.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by EFGuy
 


As I see it, it's nothing but a business ploy. Google is probably one of the biggest aggregations of data on the internet. Being able to sell that data could be worth billions to Google. These people who say things such as this are generally people who simple don't have to worry about such issues due to their social or financial status. Just like millionaires who don't have a problem with high property taxes or other taxes. It is a mere annoyance to them therefore they are free to support such things. I would bet anything that this Google idiot has a state-of-the-art security system in his home with cameras at every turn.

It's funny how TPTB can squeeze something like abortion through the door of "privacy" but the rest of us aren't entitled to it. How bass ackwards can we get?



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 02:45 PM
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Personally, I could care less. I need a little motivation to use the library more, so no big loss. Have fun trying to collect information on my physical searches of card catalogues and the books that I don't check out.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:00 PM
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well thank goodness for scroogle.org.....screw the hell out of google. anonymous surfing FTW. google isnt worth using and i urge everyone else to stop using it as well.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by JackHerer4Prez
Personally, I could care less. I need a little motivation to use the library more, so no big loss. Have fun trying to collect information on my physical searches of card catalogues and the books that I don't check out.


If you would rather be using the public library instead of the internet;
Then why dont do it now?
Whats stopping you?

Let me guess...
The limited amount of information....

[edit on 10-8-2010 by SupremeKnowledge]



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:08 PM
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In other words Schmidt wants the impact of the IT Revolution to be firmly sided towards government. Where AI lowers the cost of information analysis, and information storage provides an almost infinitely cheap solution to information gathering. Meanwhile the individual is as powerless against political monopoly as they were in say 1980.

This man’s avocation of a bigger surveillance state may earn him some (taxpayer funded) business for his work-connections (I can see him getting a job in the EU!). However whilst all very lucrative, I hope he might read a copy of e.g. George Orwell’s 1984, so he may better understand the kind of future, his efforts on earth, will help trap his-our grandchildren in.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:11 PM
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These changes will, of course, only apply to the masses, not the elites.
They are and will continue to be protected by all sorts of privacy laws and illegal use of the 'use it for everything' national security laws.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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You know, if I had some extra money right now I would love to surprise my parents with a grand trip to 'their homeland' - mainly Czech Republic and Germany but also the whole area, maybe parts of Russia too.

So how about instead of booking a wonderful holiday for a present for my parents - I wind up sitting in jail suspected of being some kind of spy?

"If you've got nothing to hide you shouldn't worry about privacy?"

But what if people misconstrue your intentions?



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:21 PM
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What can we do right now;
To stop this crazed lunatic?

Be creative



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:28 PM
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I'm surprised nobody mentioned the all seeing eye of Horus on the OP's source article.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by ModernAcademia

Google CEO Eric Schmidt says privacy isn't important, and if you want to keep something private, "maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place" (in other words, "innocent people have nothing to hide.")


So I shouldn't take showers anymore?
No more sex?


Man, I hate that type of thinking!
Someone tell this idiot that nobody likes a nosy neighbour



Hey, if the government is willing to follow the same guidelines, Im down for it.

If they want privacy they shouldnt be doing it, right? Make everything open if they want us to sacrifice our privacy. No more one sided sacrifices.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by ThaLoccster
 


that comparison does not follow. I can't shoot someone on the internet and I can't steal money without risking getting caught... just like a bank.

This is rediculous but then their are enough stupid people in the world to want this. Let mommy and daddy government and business keep you safe.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 04:00 PM
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This type of behaviour doesnt surprise me in the least especialy considering thier ties and start up capital came from the CIA.To be honest our privacy was gone along time ago.One thing that can help is to look into alternative OS's (exp.Linux,unix).Linux is open source and means you can build your own firewalls, and its free.www.linuxlookup.com... using alternative search engines is also an option.Just make sure they are not using googles engine to assist in there searches.Look into using true annonymous proxies if your of the extra paranoid type.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 04:01 PM
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If the CEO of Google gives me his private e-mail contact list I'll give him mine.

Oh wait, he already has mine why would he give me his?

LOL at this guy.

Peasants don't need privacy but I bet he won't give out his phone contacts or even e-mail contacts list.

Why not? To give his friends/connections and himself privacy.




posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by jtma508
Business is pushing hard to erase anonymity. The biggest challenge of marketing online is that you never really know who your potential customers and prospects are. You can target them using behavioral segments but unlike traditional marketing, they're largely unknown. To be able to identify us on the web and connect us to all the real-world behavioral and demographic data available would be a winfall for business. You can be sure they are pushing uber-hard for this.

I think you're right about the corporate side of this assault. It also has a hatespeech connotation as political discussions will be tempered by this. No one wants to tell the truth about a certain *cough* group of people if anyonmity is scrapped. They thought it all out.
Look for buzzwords like this very subject, internet license and others to emerge in day to day media broadcasts.

Then there's a new business model being watered which serves to 'protect your awnline reputation', headed by hirsute Michael Fertig, and others. They are saying that you 'don't want to be associated awnline(sic) with friends who are deadbeats, racist', blah blah. I say these men are arch enemies of freedom and the Constitution. Arch enemies...I can't see it in any other way because they know what they are doing and why they are doing this. Greed. In their world, you have an 'awnline reputation' to protect. It ties in with bad credit, not being hired because of it, being shunned like a leper if you have it. Many aps to this. I hate corporate society. Look what it's become...since industry is out, all we have are maggots creating jobs which do nothing except strap our freedom, even destroy manufacturing, if you will, since many of these new jobs were deliberately scheduled to fall in to the green sector.

You'll be punished if you manage to get anything 'real' across 'awnline' just as you would if you were a pirate broadcaster.

And it will put a lid on the search for truth. Or cause it to boil....



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 04:07 PM
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I have come across this site www.googlesharing.net... in the past just wondering if anyone has used it. It's seems it's goal is to stop google from building a profile on you. Also they have posted the source code to the server.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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By the way guys, make sure you don't use google chrome, it collects huge amounts of data on your browsing.



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