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Is it morally irresponsible to teach childeren about religion?

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posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 10:54 AM
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I didn't think this tread would explode while I was gone.

I intended to respond to much of what was said.

When I talk about the evil done in the name of god.

I am talking about the crusades, the spanish inquisition, the conquering of the natives of north and south america, the jihads of the middle east, suicide bombers, ostracizing homosexuals, protesting soldiers funerals, cults.

I understand why people may feel the need to have a god in the sky who hears every whispered prayer of every person everywhere, and a god who is always there for them. It's nurturing but it is a cop out. People don't care about how our world is treated because this is not the life that matters to them, this is temporary, our race will live on in heaven. If our(societies)children are not made to believe that there is a magic world where all wishes come true when we die, then we will treat this life that is real with more respect and will take better care of it.

Also I can't wrap my head around why people honestly believe that 2000 years ago people were living to the age of 900 years old, talking to animals(today you would be in an institution) walking on water, and turning water into wine.
Seriously, how is this heard an not laughed at. Not to mention that a person was swallowed by a fish and lived for three days. Jesus came back from the dead?

Why is all of this accepted as truth and things like Santa Claus are false. Is it not crazier to think that a guy talked to animals and walked on water and came back to life then for a single person to travel the world giving presents?

Can't we just teach our children to be good people without having to believe in these obvious fairy tales?

Even if there is a god and he did speak to these people. It is a message that would be filtered through generations before it was finally written down. I am sure we have all played the game telephone, you start out with the word watermelon then it gets whispered from person to person and at the end it ends up being rhinoceros.

If there is something to be adhered to that religion offers its the ten commandments, at least they are morals, they don't breed hate, they don't have fancy superheros, and there are no talking animals.

What makes Scientology so crazy when there is more fantastical make believe in the bible.

If the global society were able to make it to the point where there is no religion, can you imagine the things that we would be concerned with. I guarantee we would be concerned with the actual future (i.e where are we going to live in 200 years.)

I don't even want to hear the people who say that without religion we would all kill each other, because we are still people with consciences.

If you are going to teach one religion teach them all so at least a thought out decision can be made.

[edit on 11-8-2010 by born-indigo]




posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 11:20 AM
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Originally posted by born-indigo
If you are going to teach one religion teach them all so at least a thought out decision can be made.


Are you kidding me? Do you fail to see the insanity of this? Do you understand what faith is?

I am a Christian. This mean that I have faith in Christianity. This means that I believe Christianity is right. This means this I think that the other religions are wrong in some fashion (not "bad", just not right, in the same way that I think Christianity is right.)

If you don't like that paragraph, ask yourself why someone would follow a religion if they thought it was wrong, and something else was right? Whether they've worked through it (as I have) or just accepted some "default", everyone who has a faith has it because they believe their way is "right".

Now, you expect me to teach my kids "all religions" (however that's possible, there are an awful lot of them,) given that I think that only one is right? It's one thing to acknowledge Judaism or Islam, quite another for me to "teach it", which would be a disservice to both my kids and to those other faiths, because I think that they are wrong.

That said, if one of my kids decides to become a Hindu or Buddhist or atheist or something else, I am okay with that, because I have complete tolerance for their decision. I will think them wrong, I would be disappointed, but their relationship to God is between them and God, it's not my place to force them into agreeing with me, and I don't think God would want me to do that anyway.

My faith is a critical component of who I am, and it's something that I do not hide. Saying that I either need to hide my faith from my kids or diminish it in any way is the equivalent of telling them that who I am and how I became this way is none of their business, is something to be ashamed of, or is something I believe they're not capable of. All of which are wrong, wrong, wrong and any parent will tell you that.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 12:34 PM
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I find it hard to swallow that you would just think and tell them that you don't like there choice. its more likley that you would nag them to death. since no matter how many times some thing is proven wrong. that they cling to it. but than again thats faith you have faith that some thing is going to be out there. faith that your god is really there. even tho your god is nothing more than a cross of pagan and christain b.s can you tell me what is the point to x-mas? or easter? I grew up in the church and cannot tell any one why a magic bunny hopping around crapping easter eggs has to do with the big guy.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 12:52 PM
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Originally posted by Reaper2137
I find it hard to swallow that you would just think and tell them that you don't like there choice. its more likley that you would nag them to death.


Thanks for your assumption, but that is incorrect. My daughter does not attend church with me, and I neither bug nor nag her about it. I just go to church by myself. If she wants to go, she's welcome to, but her absence doesn't bother me.



can you tell me what is the point to x-mas? or easter? I grew up in the church and cannot tell any one why a magic bunny hopping around crapping easter eggs has to do with the big guy.


Because the Germans who came up with the notion saw it as symbolic of Christ's resurrection? If you're concerned, try doing some reading. www.lhmint.org...



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 12:58 PM
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Bunny's and Eggs - - and all that other stuff.

Basically ALL rituals are about Harvest and Fertility. They come from Pagan roots.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 01:04 PM
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Religion is just as important to teach as History. There are many ways of teaching kids religion without taking them to church or other things.

If a parents think they have a objective way of teaching their kids religion without creating a monster, there shouldn't be a problem.

The first thing i told my kids. Listen to your friends, but dont believe a word they say without checking.

Kids will most often go for the same believes and views as their friends have. Especially girls.

EDIT:

As a parent you should never force your own believes or views on your own kid(s). Because then you are not being objective. Most religious teachers are not objective about their teaching, but subjective. Most read a text right from the books and spill their minds out about what it really means. That is something we also should have learnt from our history.



[edit on 27.06.08 by spy66]



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 07:00 PM
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Easter is based on the ancient Celtic Bird Festival called Alban Eiler, which is also times with the Gaelic festival of the goddess Ishtar on March 21st during the Vernal Equinox.

Customs of the time included painting/collecting birds eggs, bird watching and egg hunts, etc.

All modern religious festivals are based in ancient cultures, and were usurped by the incoming religion in order to convert those from the old faiths.. along with Conversion at The Sword.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by Tayesin
 


Easter is associated with the Jewish feast of Passover, because that's when Christ died and was resurrected. It has nothing to do with Alban Eiler or the Vernal Equinox. Symbology may, but that would be coincidental to Easter, not a cause of it.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 07:47 PM
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Originally posted by adjensen
reply to post by Tayesin
 


Easter is associated with the Jewish feast of Passover, because that's when Christ died and was resurrected. It has nothing to do with Alban Eiler or the Vernal Equinox. Symbology may, but that would be coincidental to Easter, not a cause of it.


One can assume that Easter has no former roots of dates and cultures...but is it just happenstance that the cycles of Spring Equinox and the New moon therafter were observed before the time of the OT and the passover?

All rituals and dates that are found in the Bible (most of them all) can be observed in a former culture, in a former time.

So how special are the ways and days of the OT if they can be found in former ways of the people?

I find it ironic that the same days that are special in the OT for what ever reason are the same days that many ancients observed and held as special for their own reasons.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 07:58 PM
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Originally posted by adjensen
I am a Christian. This mean that I have faith in Christianity. This means that I believe Christianity is right. This means this I think that the other religions are wrong in some fashion (not "bad", just not right, in the same way that I think Christianity is right.)


The problem is that children have trouble differentiating between faith and truth.

The question remains, is it moral to teach faith as if it were truth?



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by LeoVirgo
 


Passover occurs "around" the Equinox, not on it. Geez, there are four such annual days, the equinoxes and the solstices, so being near one of them is hardly a source for complaint.

It stands to reason that ancient people would have holidays associated with constants like these days, since they were an easy way to always get the day right when a calendar wasn't something you had hanging on the wall. No one (well, no one I know) claims that Christ was born on Christmas -- fact of the matter is that we don't know when he was born (March, last time I heard,) and the early Church snagged a convenient Pagan holiday, because it's easier to get people up on your holiday when they're already in a festive mood.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by Jezus

Originally posted by adjensen
I am a Christian. This mean that I have faith in Christianity. This means that I believe Christianity is right. This means this I think that the other religions are wrong in some fashion (not "bad", just not right, in the same way that I think Christianity is right.)


The problem is that children have trouble differentiating between faith and truth.

The question remains, is it moral to teach faith as if it were truth?


As it is the truth for me, and the alternative is to teach it as if it were not the truth, yes, of course it is. Frankly, it would be immoral to NOT teach it as if it were truth, because that would require me to lie.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 08:15 PM
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I suppose I can understand why people seem to dislike organized religion, wars upon wars have been faught in some way or another because of religion. People have been persecuted and put to death because of different beliefs. yet we still, well at least a big majority have people want to practice organized religion of some kind or another.

Could the need to have an idea of something higher than ourselves be engrained into the human code. If we are spiritual creatures in fleshly bodies maybe the desire is so great for tens of thousands of years we have been drawn to the sky in search of something greater than ourselves.

Could it be that, thousands of years of civilization be wrong. I would dare to say that there must be some truth to the madness.

So if there is truth tp this should we teach our children that there is something higher than ourselves, I think that should be up to the individual parent and there own individual belief system.

If you are a serious practitioner of a faith of somekind than I dont think there would be any debate over, what a parent would do. They will more than likley want to teach there children what is important to them, and what they feel will help there children frow up in this world.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 08:40 PM
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Originally posted by adjensen
As it is the truth for me, and the alternative is to teach it as if it were not the truthmoral to NOT teach it as if it were truth


You could teach faith as if it were faith.

Is it moral to teach a child that your faith is truth when it has no choice but to believe you?

Wouldn't it be more honest to first teach the distinction between faith and truth?

The question remains.

Is it moral to make your faith the truth for your child?

Why can't you let the child decide his or her own truth?



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 08:55 PM
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reply to post by Jezus
 


That is not the way it works, You can be a child or a adult you will learn from someone.

Although sometimes I think it might be better if, we waited till we were adults to learn about God. I think alot of people who are against faith and God, have been hurt somehow by it, or was taught it growing up and have been let down.

Although I will say I was brought up Christian, I did my thing I have not practiced Christianity the way my parents would have liked me too, but I will always be gratefull for them teaching me about the faith, that I poses today.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by humbleseeker
I think alot of people who are against faith and God, have been hurt somehow by it, or was taught it growing up and have been let down.


I know you did not say all.

However - stating anyway - - NO - I was not hurt in anyway by faith or God- - or let down.

I simply found no realism in it.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 09:32 PM
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Originally posted by Jezus
The question remains.

Is it moral to make your faith the truth for your child?

Why can't you let the child decide his or her own truth?


I already answered you. As it is the truth for me, it would be disingenuous to teach that it is not. Contrary to your implication, it is not taught as an absolute, and my daughter has indeed decided her own truth of the matter.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by humbleseeker
 


The fact remains that there is a distinct difference between teaching faith as faith and faith as truth.

One can be intellectually damaging.

One can be spiritually enlightening.



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 10:12 PM
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It is such a hard topic, that maybe all religion should just be done away with. I am not in that camp, but I guess I can look at Islam and Christianity and how they have grown to be bitter enemies. The muslim trains his child to follow Allah, the Christian Jesus.

I guess I would have to conclude that it could be irresponsible to continue with religion as we know it.

then again thats religion as the world views it today. I believe we are all brothers and sisters under one God and that true religion his nothing more than showing that love to one another.

Jesus said if you give a cup of water to a thirsty man, then you are giving a cup to me.

If it was possible to teach faith which I feel is very important, but also teach to not hate one another, as part of are faith the world would be a better place

Jesus said on the cross while he was about to die. "forgive them for they no not what they do"



posted on Aug, 11 2010 @ 10:19 PM
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reply to post by adjensen
 


Considering that Passover and Alban Eiler were festivals or observances based at the same time and during the same full moon around the Equinox I would hesistate a little to say which is the Original.

But, it would seem to me that Passover is of a much later dating to the Natural Cycles early humans worked within.. and from where this Celtic Bird Festival originated in a much earlier pre-Celtic form.

So, I was speaking specifically about modern Easter and how the symbolism is usurped by Religion to become what we see today. I don't see any symbolisms for Birds/Eggs in the Hebrew Passover Ritual.. hence I cannot see it as the originating source for Easter.



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