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The Five Stages of Grief, Concerning 9/11

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posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 09:29 PM
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The “Five stages of Grief” and 9/11.

The Kübler-Ross model, commonly known as the five stages of grief, was first introduced by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in her 1969 book, On Death and Dying

The five stages are as follows:

Denial – "I feel fine."; "This can't be happening, not to me."
Denial is usually only a temporary defense for the individual. This feeling is generally replaced with heightened awareness of situations and individuals that will be left behind after death.

. Anger – "Why me? It's not fair!"; "How can this happen to me?"; "Who is to blame?"
Once in the second stage, the individual recognizes that denial cannot continue. Because of anger, the person is very difficult to care for due to misplaced feelings of rage and envy. Any individual that symbolizes life or energy is subject to projected resentment and jealousy.

. Bargaining – "Just let me live to see my children graduate."; "I'll do anything for a few more years."; "I will give my life savings if..."
The third stage involves the hope that the individual can somehow postpone or delay death. Usually, the negotiation for an extended life is made with a higher power in exchange for a reformed lifestyle. Psychologically, the individual is saying, "I understand I will die, but if I could just have more time..."

Depression – "I'm so sad, why bother with anything?"; "I'm going to die... What's the point?"; "I miss my loved one, why go on?"
During the fourth stage, the dying person begins to understand the certainty of death. Because of this, the individual may become silent, refuse visitors and spend much of the time crying and grieving. This process allows the dying person to disconnect oneself from things of love and affection. It is not recommended to attempt to cheer up an individual who is in this stage. It is an important time for grieving that must be processed.

Acceptance – "It's going to be okay."; "I can't fight it, I may as well prepare for it."
In this last stage, the individual begins to come to terms with their mortality or that of their loved one.

I feel Elisabeth had it right, and this is most evident in the 9/11 attacks.

1. Denial:

This can not be happening. “A small group of people who hate me, supported by a larger group of people who hate me, for no reason, could not have done this to me.” “Is this real? It cant be.” I will start to look at alternatives.” “The majority of the Muslim religion preaches peace and love, so it couldn’t be them.” “So I’ll follow the money, I’ll look at all those who would prosper from this scenario.” “There is no way Muslims did this to us!”


2. Anger:

This automatically splits into two groups: Those that believe that Muslim terrorists did this, and those that believe it was set up by our government, or “The Powers that Be, who control our government.”
One group will automatically attack all Muslims because, quite frankly, they were the only ones involved. The other group will attack and blame the government and The Powers That Be, because they are still unable to accept the simple truth that we were attacked by a small group of radical Muslims. This group will never consent, because they cannot believe it is possible that the small Muslim group was able to pull this off, without help from our own corrupt, eugenics based government. Though, If you bring up that there may in-fact be no conspiracy, prepare for a tirade.



3. Bargaining:

There is a large group who never even considered this before but are willing to bow down to the “World Community” and the “Muslim Countries”. These are the people who the terrorism has actually worked against the most. “Fine, you do whatever you want in your own country”. “If you need me to, I will agree with you and bow before Allah. Just leave me, my family and my friends alone, we’re sorry”.

4. Depression:


I believe that this is the state we are in now. “We all work too hard“. “Someone could kill us at any minute.” “I don’t want my children to deal with this.” “Why does this go on and on and on…”
“Why don’t we just appease them?” “ Why don’t we kill everybody responsible? “ “Why are the people over there willing to appease”. “If you are a patriot, you would condemn them all.” “Who cares about patriotism? Let’s hear their point, and convince them not to attack again”. “I don’t know what to do, I’m angry, I’m scared, I’m confused, I don’t know what to do.” “Does America matter that much?” Yes. it does.


5. Acceptance:


I don’t believe we will ever come to this point. Many of us will not accept until we are dead. The first four, broke us up into so many different factions, that acceptance may never be a option.



I still believe a small group of Religeous extrremists caused this tragedy. Will I ever be the same? No.




posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by dreamwalker74
 


Now apply the same process to the Iraqi people. That will be more interesting because millions have died in Iraq due to the US invasion, occupation and mismanagement, not to mention unjustified, illegal and aggression.

Forget about torture



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by oozyism
 


No telling what Saddam would have done, or not done. Though if you ask the thousands of Iraqi families, who had family members tortured, raped, and killed under his regime, or if you ask the thousands of Kurds who are left after multiple gas, and biological attacks, whether he should still be there, they would just laugh, while praising the U.S. Whether we went there under false pretenses or not, there are many who are not only gratefull, but alive, for us doing so.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 09:56 PM
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Dreamwalker74: "I still believe a small group of Religeous extrremists caused this tragedy. Will I ever be the same? No."

If what you believe is true, what is your suggestion to prevent such a recurrence in the future?

Surely small groups of troublemakers should be easily dealt with.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 09:58 PM
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Originally posted by dreamwalker74
reply to post by oozyism
 


No telling what Saddam would have done, or not done. Though if you ask the thousands of Iraqi families, who had family members tortured, raped, and killed under his regime, or if you ask the thousands of Kurds who are left after multiple gas, and biological attacks, whether he should still be there, they would just laugh, while praising the U.S. Whether we went there under false pretenses or not, there are many who are not only gratefull, but alive, for us doing so.


Actually if those Iraqi Kurds, and Iraqi Shiits knew history they would laugh at you and give you a punch in the face. Do you know why?

Because Saddam believe it or not was a puppet of the US, during his murdering spree of Kurds and Shiits, and innocent Iranians, the US supported Saddam fully.

Funnily when the Puppet turned, and became a revolutionized puppet the master installed sanctions, and invaded and hanged the puppet to show other Arab puppets what would happen if they cut the strings.

Learn your history, don't forget it was Western bio/Chemical weapons used against innocent Iranians.

Examine how Iraq was when Saddam changed, and stopped being a puppet.

IT was much better, but US installed sanctions when Saddam changed, in direct result of those sanctions over a million Iraqi children died.

GOD BLESS THE US



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by oozyism
 


If I ever live in a country, where most of my relatives are dead because of gas attacks, Where, my mother was taken into custody and raped until dead, the same day my father was shot in a line of other dissidants, and I'm sitting in a prison as a political disident, for simply being related. Yes I pray that somebody, anybody will help me, regardless of motives.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by oozyism
 


I could argue this all night. Thank you for trying to take me off topic. Was the government involved in 9/11? Or wa it a small band of Extremists?
Start your own post on Iraq, and I promise I will reply.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by Golden Rule
 


If you decided to go "all out" would you be "easy to deal with? Just a question.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 10:14 PM
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Originally posted by dreamwalker74
reply to post by oozyism
 


I could argue this all night. Thank you for trying to take me off topic. Was the government involved in 9/11? Or wa it a small band of Extremists?
Start your own post on Iraq, and I promise I will reply.


I won't derail your topic, all I asked for:

For you to apply the same 5 stages to Iraqi people due to US invasion.

You refused to do it, not a problem there.

Just to add some facts and not let false claims flourish:


Most crucially, the US blocked condemnation of Iraq's chemical attacks in the UN Security




Saddam Hussein committed most of his crimes as an ally of the U.S. government. He only became the "new Hitler" when he stepped out of line--threatening Washington's control over the flow of Middle East oil.




But whenever Iran began to gain the upper hand, the U.S. shifted behind Iraq. "While we want no victor, we can't stand to see Iraq defeated," said Richard Armitage--then an assistant defense secretary in the Reagan administration, now a top deputy to Secretary of State Colin Powell--in testimony to Congress.




The U.S. intervention "had little to do with defending 'freedom of the seas' or neutrality," former Regan National Security Adviser Robert McFarlane admitted. "When, in early 1987, Iran made a strategic gain on the Faw Peninsula, we tilted blatantly in favor of Iraq, as we had at similar moments before...[O]ur naval presence...would ensure that Iraq received the supplies it needed to dominate the war."




NONE OF the current Bush administration's justifications for its invasion of Iraq would be complete without referring to how Saddam "gassed his own people." But Saddam's use of chemical weapons took place during the 1980s, when he was a U.S. ally. In fact, Iraq was already using chemical weapons--on an "almost daily basis," according to the Washington Post--when the Reagan administration sent a special envoy to Baghdad in 1983 to show its support.




According to the Associated Press, Saddam used chemical weapons to kill an estimated 190,000 Kurds between 1983 and 1988--along with 50,000 Iranian soldiers, about one in 10 casualties on the Iranian side during the war. All the while, the Reagan administration downplayed Saddam's poison gas massacres--even claiming at one point that its preferred enemy, Iran, was responsible.

In 1988, when a Senate Foreign Relations committee staff report exposed the killings of Kurds in northern Iraq, Sen. Claiborne Pell (D-R.I.) proposed the Prevention of Genocide Act to put pressure on the Iraqi government. But the Reagan administration orchestrated the measure's defeat in Congress.

In an echo of Winston Churchill's comment a half century before, one defense official told the New York Times, "The use of gas on the battlefield by the Iraqis was not a matter of deep strategic concern."

Part of the reason for Washington's silence about Saddam's use of weapons of mass destruction was that U.S. corporations helped to supply them. Throughout the 1980s, the Iraqi government bought the ingredients for its biological weapons program legally--from suppliers in the U.S. and Europe.

Strains of anthrax, botulinum and other toxins came from a company in Rockville, Md.--or from the U.S. government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When Iraq provided a report on its chemical, biological and nuclear weapons programs to United Nations inspectors at the end of 2002, the U.S. tried to censor information about American corporate suppliers.


I know it is too much read:
socialistworker.org...



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 10:50 PM
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reply to post by dreamwalker74
 




The five stages
Denial
Anger
Bargaining
Depression
Acceptance


That seems pretty close. But for me personally the stages were more like:

Shock:
Whoa...are you people really panicking and traumatized about 911? Why?

Confusion:
No really...why are you people so worked up about this? A couple planes crashed into some buildings. Why all the drama?

Anger:
Would you people just relax and stop freaking out over 911? It's been years. Get over it. No I don't want to be frisked and scanned at the airport. No I don't want to be inspected at LAX by a guy with an assault rifle. No I don't want to have to explain what mochi is to the homeland security officer. Seriously, can we stop all this and go back to the old USA where the only paranoid lunatics we had to worry about were the ones hijacking airplanes?

Bargaining:
Would you people please stop freaking out over 911? With sugar on top?

Acceptance:
*shrug* People like to freak out and blow things out of proportion.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by LordBucket
 


It seems the people who actually need those 5 stages of grief are the ones who were unable to think critically, and arrive at the conclusion that factions within our own government, in compliance with Israeli intelligence and the Pakistani ISI, are the real culprits of that day. Money trails and paper trails prove that Mohammed Atta was working for the US government.


But I totally disagree that it should be forgotten. 9/11 was used as the pretext for 10 years of constant war in the Middle East, an unprecedented attack on the US Constitution and personal freedoms, and is still to this day used to expand our global military empire. If we can finally bring the truth of 9/11 to light, who knows what kind of impact it will have on our foreign and domestic policy?

[edit on 8-8-2010 by Son of Will]



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