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Immortality, how and why?

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posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 03:38 AM
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reply to post by oozyism
 


I made a post a while ago which seems to be relevant here, it was a post I made on a thread asking people to disuss their theories of life after death:


Originally posted by CHA0S
reply to post by Impro
 


My overall theory is somewhat complex and requires a few different concepts to be carefully entwined before it can be properly understood. In simple terms, I would explain it like this:

Due to the complex design of a physical human brain, and the way it computes energy, when the brain is at a certain stage of development, it will spawn sentience, an unpredictable, creative, original and artistic consciousness. It is due to the very nature of our consciousness that we become creators with the power to exert an influence on the reality around us. Such an entity is no longer just a part of the system, but has become aware of the system, and once you are aware of the system, the simple act of observing the system can change everything. Instead of thinking of "reality" as something we each exist within, or something we experience around us, we must realize that everything, including ourselves and our consciousness are deeply embedded within and are part of the structure of reality.

When one thinks of the universe as an interconnected web of energy, it becomes clear we are nothing but extremely complex energy beings operating in dense energy suits, what we call physical matter. I believe when our physical suits die, we revert back to the most primal and pure form a sentient consciousness can posses. The reason such pure forms of energy beings don't lose their form or cognitive abilities once again comes back to the nature of our consciousness. Basically, we aren't simply programmed robots following instructions, like simpler forms of life, we are sentient beings, but our very sentience is structured within the same reality we have become aware of. I guess you could say the system has become aware of its self, and the system is by no means static or unchanging, being part of the system and aware of the system at the same time gives sentient lifeforms an advantage humans somehow use to their disadvantage.

I guess that could be summarized as, the more you don't want to die, or the more you believe you will go on into an afterlife, the greater your chance of doing just that becomes, because you exert the influence needed to hold your consciousness together without a physical brain to manage the energy. I do certainly believe there is something after death, because I have had an OBE myself, and my Mother has an amazing story about when she was giving birth to my little sister, and I tend to believe her without doubt, because, well, she' my mother...I don't know if I'll go so far as to believe in reincarnation, but I do have a theory on it...to me the whole paranormal/afterlife topic is sort of like the UFO topic, there's a lot of good, hard hitting evidence, if you just take time to look, and there's also a lot of crap...but people need to keep an open mind and admit they might not have the answers to everything, because there are some truly inexplicable things out there.


[edit on 8/8/10 by CHA0S]




posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 04:35 AM
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Anyone read Viktor Pelevin? He's been translated into English. Some great thinkers on this thread. Immortality..? Aren't we immortal anyway?



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 04:45 AM
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Immortality is a really interesting subject, the only thing that I can really contribute is that there are certain plants that live for an amazingly long time by a process of cloning themselves like this Jurupa Oak which is estimated to be 13000 years old and thisTasmanian shrub which is even older at 43000 years.
Pretty amazing imho



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 07:58 PM
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Originally posted by davespanners
Immortality is a really interesting subject, the only thing that I can really contribute is that there are certain plants that live for an amazingly long time by a process of cloning themselves like this Jurupa Oak which is estimated to be 13000 years old and thisTasmanian shrub which is even older at 43000 years.
Pretty amazing imho


Thank you very much, that truly is an important information in regards to this subject.

I will add that to my thoughts and do a remix



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 11:50 PM
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Originally posted by oozyism

Thank you very much, that truly is an important information in regards to this subject.

I will add that to my thoughts and do a remix
#

The life span of trees and plants always amazes me, but most of those that live the longest seem to rely on self cloning as a way of propagating themselves, I would guess that the downfall of breeding in this way is that the species never evolves (as each successive generation is an exact copy of the last) and thus can't adapt to new environments and that's why they are usually only living in isolated pockets of untouched land.

Kind of like an evolutionary dead end that has found a niche but as soon as that niche has gone then they die.

Hope that made some kind of sense




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