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The lost library of alexandria or human amnesia

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posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by SynMedian
 


I have to respectfully disagree in regards sciences. Great examples can be made between the Western systems of Herbal medicine and the Eastern (Ayurveda and Chinese). The Latter experienced an unbroken continuum for over 4 thousand years of emprical data pertaining to many different aspects of drying, processing/preparing, combining and subtle alchemical measures that have persisted all along in these traditions. However in regards the Western systems 3 big 3 judeo christian faiths each placed gigantic hurdles in our timeline especially the Catholic Church, separating the science into smaller constituent parts, many going underground ie. Alchemy which had its earliest start that I can find in plant medicine far before metallurgy...anything that interfered the Vatican viewpoint was met with death.

Sure science is built upon previous science, but there are still a number of ways for it to persist without knowledge of its predicators. I mean look at it this way many people can use a gun, but few know how to make one...
Look at the dark ages in Europe, science can be lost then picked up and used again without the same caliber for understanding.

The Anti Kythyri device, hell the Pyramids, theres any a number of examples of lost science throughout the area the Library existed that prove a deeper understanding of previous held science is still missing.




posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 12:38 PM
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Originally posted by Danbones
You are reading the lost library of alexandria right now..

As Edgar Cayce said it would be found at the foot of the sphinx, which just before the internet was made available to the public, the pyramids at Giza brought the idea to the fore that the status quo regarding publicly available information was ummm.... questionable.


Just saying it in a post doesn't make it true.

Cayce never said what you here claim concerning the Library of Alexandria. But even if he did, what of it? He was wrong with almost everything he said. Why should we listen to him on this subject?


Originally posted by FoxStriker
I have a feeling that to the victor goes the spoils...

I think that the knowledge that was contained in the Library of Alexandria was carted away...

or sealed somewhere safe by the Egyptian...

The library was Greek, not Egyptian.


Originally posted by FoxStrikerThese Roman Conquerers were no fools... they were masterminds like the 7 Elite and Puppet Bilderburg Group. I think they understood that knowledge was Advantage, Power and Control.

It seems like the most logical thing to do was take it back to Rome and and have it known among a few Elite to use if it was ever needed...

Just a Theory of course...

but then again... the late empererors were fearful of the masses.... so any city or establishment resembling free thought and knowledge was probly deemed dangerous to the Roman Empire... Guess a good scroll burning was in order.

Fox.


You have either never looked into the subject, or you have been misled on it.

The Library disappeared in great part a couple of hundred years into the Common Era:


The library seems to have been maintained and continued in existence until its contents were largely lost during the taking of the city by the Emperor Aurelian (270–275), who was suppressing a revolt by Queen Zenobia of Palmyra ( ruled Egypt 269-274 CE ).

Source

The first burning (by Julius Caesar) was almost certainly not intentional, and didn't destroy the majority of the Library.

The excerpt I included above relates that the site was finally pretty much done in when Rome supressed the Palmyrene Empire, a group that split off from Rome in the first part of the 3rd century AD.

So, Rome ruled Egypt from 31 BC on, but waited until 270 AD to "suppress" the knowledge in the Library?

Not likely.


Originally posted by bekod
always wondered what man would do with such knowledge, how to build the pyramids,

The Library, again, was Greek, not Egyptian.

By the time Alexandria (the city) was founded, the Egyptians knew no more about how the pyramids were built than the Greeks did, and both knew far, far less than we know about it today.


how to make light 101 using clay and iron, you too can make a sun blade, cut stone like a pro, pocket map of Atlantis with must see sites,

Neither the Greeks nor the Egyptians had any knowledge whatsoever of anyplace called Atlantis or any place that was even similar to what Plato wrote about. Not in their collective knowledge, and not in any of their myths or legends.


Where would we know if we had this knowledge?

We already know far more than was ever stored in Alexandria.

A better question might be "Where would we be today had Rome not collapsed?"

The knowledge of ancient Greece and India was kept by the Arabs. We got it back (and then some) from them when we finally realized we should pay attention to them.

Harte



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 02:39 PM
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Originally posted by triplescorpio
very rich my freind


That all depends on what's in the envelope. You're asking us to speculate on what might have been in a library of which we know nothing.



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by triplescorpio
 





where would we be now if the library was never lost what would we know how much different would our existence be?


Actually, the Library of Alexandria isn't all lost. There has been about two or three books uncovered from ancient times that were once in the Library of Alexandria. Philosophers and scientists who used to study there have wrote about it in logs and journals. The library itself may be lost, but we know for sure that it did exist.



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by triplescorpio
 





where would we be now if the library was never lost what would we know how much different would our existence be?


Actually, the Library of Alexandria isn't all lost. There has been about two or three books uncovered from ancient times that were once in the Library of Alexandria. Philosophers and scientists who used to study there have wrote about it in logs and journals. The library itself may be lost, but we know for sure that it did exist.



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 04:13 PM
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If the library is was in Egypt why would in not have books, writings, and tablets, on the Egyptian way of life? how to books have all been a part mankind that has a written language, why could there not be key books on the "how to", how to build, how to write, how to read, do we not have them? ie. how to for dummies line of books, got any of them?

Here is a thought say in 2000 years some one finds remains of the library of congress what books writings were in there did it have books ? if so what kind? were they of this peoples or of others? do you know the types of books in the library of congress, have even seen the web site visited it are all books kept there?

So to say there is no reference to long ago civilizations that could have been in such a library is just closed minded, i do not think all the books were destroyed, nor lost, some might even be around today,, waiting to opened and read that is if any one could, how many places have we discovered and found out latter that what we knew was in deed false or misunderstood.

[edit on 5-8-2010 by bekod]



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by bekod
 


I agree with your sentiment, too many people are so quick to dismiss ancient potential, as their own egos demand that their percieved place in the modern world is vastly superior to that preceding the present era.

Modern science disnmisses completely out of hand many many discoveries as they dont match up with their presently construed theories. There wouldnt be a "Forbidden Archeology" if mainstream academia could open up their minds to new ideas. The German fellow (forget his name) who found Troy went through the same bashing, but look he found it.

Im highly dissappointed in many people for not being able to utilize intuition and inner guidance to establish feilds of new endeavor. By ignoring an entire hemisphere of the brain seems liliputian to me.

This library held many many tomes tablets etc...things that were perhaps not translatable even in their days by the people who housed them at the library. The Library at Alexandria was commisioned by Alexander and continued with the Ptolemies who took over following his death.Writings and inventions etc.. were brought from all corners of the known earth and from distant past. Surely a large portion was undeciphered and held a great deal of unknown history and science. To simply dismiss the unkown as unimportant is absolutely laughable.



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by Shadowfoot
Modern science disnmisses completely out of hand many many discoveries as they dont match up with their presently construed theories. There wouldnt be a "Forbidden Archeology" if mainstream academia could open up their minds to new ideas.

You should pardon mainstream archaeology for using actual facts and scientific research to formulate their theories, rather than using their religion, as is the case with Michael Cremo.


Originally posted by Shadowfoot
The German fellow (forget his name) who found Troy went through the same bashing, but look he found it.

Schliemann dug where others had told him Troy might be:


Based on the work of a British archaeologist, Frank Calvert, who had been excavating the site in Turkey for over 20 years, Schliemann decided that Hissarlik was, in fact, the site of Troy. In 1868 — a busy year for Schliemann — he visited sites in the Greek world, published Ithaka, der Peloponnesus und Troja in which he asserted that Hissarlik was the site of Troy, and submitted a dissertation in ancient Greek proposing the same thesis to the University of Rostock. He received a PhD in 1869[8] from the university of Rostock for that submission. Regardless of his previous interests and adventures, Schliemann's course was set. He would take over Calvert's excavations on the eastern half of the Hissarlik site, which was on Calvert's property. The Turkish government owned the western half. Calvert became Schliemann's collaborator and partner.

Source

Frank Calvert had come to a similar conclusion twenty years earlier, as indicated above.

Calvert got the idea from Charles McClaren, who had asserted it twenty years before Calvert.

Kind of casts a dim light on the idea that "every scholar" believed Troy to be mythical before Schliemann found it, doesn't it?

By the way, though it likely is, there has to date been no evidence found that confirms the site you referenced to be the actual Troy mentioned by Homer.


Originally posted by Shadowfoot
This library held many many tomes tablets etc...things that were perhaps not translatable even in their days by the people who housed them at the library. The Library at Alexandria was commisioned by Alexander and continued with the Ptolemies who took over following his death.Writings and inventions etc.. were brought from all corners of the known earth and from distant past.

Please inform us of exactly how you became aware of the above bolded portion. Especially the underlined part. Especially in light of your assertion that we don't know what was in the Library.



Surely a large portion was undeciphered and held a great deal of unknown history and science.

Why do you think that the contents of the Library are "unknown?"

Do you believe that the Library held many tomes of which there were no copies elsewhere?

You realize, of course, that the Greeks (and the other Mediterreanean peoples that were interested) knew what was in the Library, right?

So, what do you contend was lost?

There may have been writings in the Library that could possibly clear up a handful of things we today wonder about the history of some cultures. But there existed no such thing as "history" prior to Herodotus (who lived two centuries before the Library was founded) and, like those that followed him, he studied in Egypt. So, why aren't all these Egyptian "mysteries" laid out in his works if they were just laying around for the Greeks to collect into their Library?


Originally posted by Shadowfoot
To simply dismiss the unkown as unimportant is absolutely laughable.

To elevate nothingness to the level of astonishment is what is laughable here.

Harte

[edit on 8/5/2010 by Harte]



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 05:46 AM
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reply to post by Shadowfoot
 


yep - i cant argue wi that Shadowfoot...you know your stuff.
I only meant that as i live in UK which was at the time of ALEXANDRINA BYBLIOTHECE (or academy) that study sciences were far less advanced to say the least.
We (in UK) have only fragmented knowledge of history which came from pagan traditions founded by egyptian priests and their influences on them.

All our ancient churches in the UK are on leys not by direct intent but by christian strategy to convert pagan comunities by assimilation on a scale similar to the Americanisation of Native Indians.

Advanced Asian methods of learning technologies had far more influence around the mediteranian. Cristianity was trying to spread the power to the people through reading and writing although this was only taught to monks through the means of the bible and not science or philosophy. We lost SO much in Britian when the catholic church gained power circa 500.

So....I think that some powerful knowledge that was inherant in Greece/Egypt was used objectively outwith the walls of alexandria by the well travelled scholars of their day.

Its just a shame it was lost in the rising of human spirituality and collective understanding of ONE GOD, ONE LIGHT which is the same for the destruction of the Library Itself as it represented Serepis and Pagan beliefs from its origins in neigboring ancient city of Heracleion.



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by Harte
 


A philosophical discussion as proposed in the OP would certainly make appropriate a subjective reasoning.

Many facts are ignored in mainstream science, or dismissed as accurate when they rub too abrasively against the established norm.

Simply copying and pasting from my subjective musings and finding fault with them is ...well I dont know perhaps a little over the top, if not bad form. I appreciate science based on fact, however to quote the great american pharmacist of the mid 1800s John Uri Lloyd: " the man of science must be preceded by the man of empiriciism" This would apply notably to our present discussion. To gain insight into the meaning above one would gain greater understanding by using our tools for contemplation rather than writing it off for a lack of facts...no?

I appreciate that discussion opens people up to potential gains in understanding and group growth....trying to abrasively derail an angle of research does nothing to really advance the conversation.



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 11:12 AM
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Originally posted by triplescorpio
where would we be now if the library was never lost what would we know how much different would our existence be?


We'd probably be in about the same place we are now. After all, the real "Library of Alexandria" was a bunch of different libraries, and they weren't all destroyed at the same time. Along with that, a good portion of the most important books were squirreled away, copied, or were incorporated into other libraries and private collections.

Technology has always sort of chugged along, changing things as it appears, but what really caused movement in the world were philosophical ideas, such as Christianity, Islam, or Marxism. For some reason, people are really willing to fight and die for such intangible things. And those Earth-moving ideas are generally not bound up in books and stuffed away in libraries.



posted on Aug, 6 2010 @ 09:16 PM
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To the poster that wondered what happened to Hypatia, here is what we know (and what contemporaries, or close contemporaries, say about it). Notice that the followers of the god of "love", "compassion" and "brotherhood" didn't hesitate to commit murder in front of their famed church.

So much for wondering what happened, Christianity happened!

And what happened to the last remnants of the Library? Well, Rome and then Christianity, again, happened. (notice the trend here? For many major disasters, intellectual disasters, in the past 1700-1800 years, the same culprit comes up). Read more here.

In the end we will be thankful for whatever wonders of antiquity that were lost before these monsters came about, so that they survived to this day and escaped their "holy" wrath.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 11:13 PM
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Originally posted by Harte


Originally posted by Shadowfoot
To simply dismiss the unkown as unimportant is absolutely laughable.

To elevate nothingness to the level of astonishment is what is laughable here.


physics is one thing i may be ignorant about, but haven't dozens of countries contributed to the CERN institute and their hadron collider thingy which has spent $10 Billion on trying to prove the existance of a particle that has no mass and no structure, essentially... nothing?
$10 Billion plus seems like alot of money to prove the existance of nothing.
but their "anti-matter" quest is something i'm not sure i fully understand.

no offense to math or anything, but how far is the Steven Hawkings from their destination if it is no longer measurable with numbers, numbers and letters, or numbers letters and symbols?
_________________________________________

as for the library. i've often wondered about it myself. i remember reading and/or hearing that it was estimated that the loss of the library of alexandria may have set us back a thousand years. not sure how true that is.

as for inventions recorded in the library... i think some people used to keep knowledge of their inventions from those in power out of fear that they would find a way to use it as a weapon, which usually is not the inventors intentions.

Leonardo and many inventors used to record their inventions and thoughts in code or encrypt them somehow, to help keep them secret (seek writ).



posted on Aug, 9 2010 @ 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by Esoteric Teacher

Originally posted by Harte


Originally posted by Shadowfoot
To simply dismiss the unkown as unimportant is absolutely laughable.

To elevate nothingness to the level of astonishment is what is laughable here.


physics is one thing i may be ignorant about, but haven't dozens of countries contributed to the CERN institute and their hadron collider thingy which has spent $10 Billion on trying to prove the existance of a particle that has no mass and no structure, essentially... nothing?


No. The Higgs Boson has a predicted mass of somewhere around a hundred times the mass of a proton (or more.)


no offense to math or anything, but how far is the Steven Hawkings from their destination if it is no longer measurable with numbers, numbers and letters, or numbers letters and symbols?

Physics is strange, particle physics is stranger.

Are you aware that an electron has no volume? IOW, an electron occupies no space at all.

Yet they are there, lighting up your monitor right now.


as for the library. i've often wondered about it myself. i remember reading and/or hearing that it was estimated that the loss of the library of alexandria may have set us back a thousand years. not sure how true that is.

One look around ATS shows that pretty much anything can be written. There's no way that the burning of a library in 270 AD set humans back a thousand years.


as for inventions recorded in the library... i think some people used to keep knowledge of their inventions from those in power out of fear that they would find a way to use it as a weapon, which usually is not the inventors intentions.

Leonardo and many inventors used to record their inventions and thoughts in code or encrypt them somehow, to help keep them secret (seek writ).


You could be right on this. However, that would mean that these things were never in the library to become "lost" in the first place, right?

Harte



posted on Aug, 9 2010 @ 01:53 PM
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I have often wonders if the loss of the Library of Alexandria could have caused us to loose touch with writers and poets, that are now lost to time. Imagine all of the sonnets and poems that may have only been in that library and no place else.

As far as there being technical manuals or whatever people believe was inside, if there were such things inside, surely they would have been copied to other libraries as being very important.

If the writers of these documents were trying to keep them hidden for whatever reason, this would not have been the place to keep them, so doubtful they were lost in the loss of the library.



posted on Aug, 9 2010 @ 02:26 PM
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Interesting topic, did some research and found a couple interesting info. links. I believe the Vatican holds a lot of the books, etc.. from the Library of Alexandria, however I learned France load up all the stuff from the Vatican during Napoleon Conquest. Interesting stuff got a interesting video I found on the Vatican Secret Archives (Never before seen), will post below.


Link : asv.vatican.va...


Snippet:
In 1783, all that remained at Avignon was taken to the Vatican, with the series of bull registers, called Registra Avenionensia; in 1798, the Archives of Castel S. Angelo were also taken there (Garampi was already both archivist of the Vatican Secret Archives and of Castel S. Angelo), which included also 81 documents with gold seals (in gold leaf, in solid gold, gold and silver plated caskets) and among which stood out for its precious ancient value a diploma by Friedrich Barbarossa, dating back to 1164.

In 1810, by order of Napoleon, the archives of the Holy See were taken to Paris, and then brought back to the Vatican between 1815 and 1817,

Video Title : VATICAN-ARCHIVES.mov

video Link : www.youtube.com...


thus causing great losses.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by ShadowRamesses
 


i really beleive that the vatican has knowledge that could help us all and are holding out



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:19 PM
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The thing is, the library at Alexandria was a duplicate. Any ship which came to port had its books (scrolls, mostly) temporarily confiscated. Scribes copied the books, kept the originals, and sent the copies back to the ships which sailed merrily away. So, although the collections at Alexandria represented a consolidation of much knowledge in one place, almost by definition the collections were not unique. The knowledge in these collections was not so much lost as dispersed.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 03:51 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler
The thing is, the library at Alexandria was a duplicate. Any ship which came to port had its books (scrolls, mostly) temporarily confiscated. Scribes copied the books, kept the originals, and sent the copies back to the ships which sailed merrily away. So, although the collections at Alexandria represented a consolidation of much knowledge in one place, almost by definition the collections were not unique. The knowledge in these collections was not so much lost as dispersed.


Nice.

And true, except (of course) for the "secret scrolls" that were "hidden" there so that nobody could learn to stack cut stone in a pyramidal shape!


Harte



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 05:24 PM
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Originally posted by triplescorpio
reply to post by ShadowRamesses
 


i really beleive that the vatican has knowledge that could help us all and are holding out


I wish I could spend some time in there.



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