It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Is a Hurricane forming in Michigan Right Now?

page: 3
1
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 01:36 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 01:37 PM
link   
Hi All,

I use itellcast everyday. It's their logo above their name. Weathers fine here except for a few storms and heat.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 01:40 PM
link   
www.examiner.com...

This heat wave, combined with low pressure can stir up some nasty weather for sure..



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 01:55 PM
link   
reply to post by Neopan100
 


Well on the news reports I saw it was in quotes ("inland hurricane") which means it was probably a facetious name which television reporters are apt to use. A hurricane has a very specific definition which involves oceans.


The traditional criteria that distinguish a derecho from a severe thunderstorm are sustained winds of 58 mi/h (50 kt or 93 km/h) during the storm (as opposed to gusts), high or rapidly increasing forward speed, and geographic extent (typically 250 nautica miles [280 mi or 460 km] long).[ 1] In addition, they have a miles [280 mi or 460 km] long) In addition, they have a distinctive appearance on radar (bow echo); several unique features, such as the rear inflow notch and bookend vortex, and usually manifest two or more downb

Derecho

As you see from the link above derechos are not cyclonic in nature, they are in a straight line. Likely the term "inland hurricane" was a reference to the windspeed and not the shape of the storm system. Since derecho and hurricane are nearly mutually exclusive terms.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 01:58 PM
link   

Originally posted by OzWeatherman
reply to post by davidmann
 

Its not just any water. Hurricanes, cyclones and typhoons all originate over large warm water bodies. They are specifically tropical born storms. Any other system, not born in the tropics, is a low pressure system.
Ive actually worked and been through a couple of cyclones here in Australia. I think I know what causes them. If I didnt then I wouldnt be in the job Im in now




What job is that?



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 02:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by Violater1
What job is that?


Its in my name


I work for the Bureau of Meteorology here in Australia



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 02:00 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 02:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by unityemissions
reply to post by Neopan100
 


There is a clear difference between that incredibly slow rotation and the rotation of a hurricane. The winds were freaking, but the structure and rotation hardly resembled a hurricane.





Ah, so you saw the rotation as well. Pretty weird watching it wasn't it.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 02:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by OzWeatherman

Originally posted by Violater1
What job is that?

Its in my name

I work for the Bureau of Meteorology here in Australia





I've always enjoyed the weather, even to the point of returning to school for a degree in meteorology.
I researched this a little more. What are your thoughts on this.
So this Echo that started on Lake Michigan, evolved into a Bow echo. This Bow echo had three parts to it. The top part had Cyclonic rotation. The center had the Down Burst, and the bottom had the Anticyclonic rotation. However, while it traveled between Indiana and Michigan state line, the Comma Echo became more pronounced and the rotating head of the comma formed a hook. The low pressure was strong enough to continue it’s cyclonic rotation, through to Lake Erie. I am surmising this from Dr Fujita diagram located here. www.spc.noaa.gov...

Oz, did you learn of this derecho www.spc.noaa.gov...
In your meteorology school?
Which one did you attend in Australia?


[edit on 4-8-2010 by Violater1]



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 02:26 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 02:28 PM
link   
My apoliges. I looked at the time wrong. Whatever you saw had passed long before I checked. Next time I'll be more careful before I judge someones thread.

[edit on 4-8-2010 by crappiekat]



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 02:36 PM
link   

Originally posted by crappiekat
My apoliges. I looked at the time wrong. Whatever you saw had passed long before I checked. Next time I'll be more careful before I judge someones thread.
[edit on 4-8-2010 by crappiekat]





No problems mate.
All is OK.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 02:41 PM
link   
reply to post by Violater1
 


Its hard to say without the actual satellite imagery and weather watch radar. We also dont get derecho's in Australia normally, its quite rare for us to see a hook shaped on our radars. We do get severe squall lines which do produce the same effects though. These mainly occur during summer. There us usually a slight curve with most of the squall lines Ive dealt with, particularly the ones I observed when I was living in Darwin, which is Northern Australia, but Ive never seen a strong hook shape

We only have one place here in Australia that teaches meteorology, and thats the Bureau of Meteorology, who all of us weather people over here work for.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 04:14 PM
link   
reply to post by OzWeatherman
 


Here is a radar over the one that happened in Kansas, Missouri, Illinois. If you would like to take a look..

www.youtube.com...



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 05:26 PM
link   
OP, Oz and I both answered your question. No it is not a hurricane because hurricanes have to form in tropical latitudes and have to be fueled by warm ocean water in order to fit the definition of a hurricane. A derecho is not a hurricane. Also that tornado producing supercells rotate cyclonically and anti-cyclonically. Tornados in fact rotate cyclonically and anti-cyclonically as well. They are even referred to aa cyclones sometimes. None of these things are a hurricane.

It sounds like you are still arguing that this is a hurricane.



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 06:12 AM
link   

Originally posted by Neopan100
reply to post by OzWeatherman
 


Here is a radar over the one that happened in Kansas, Missouri, Illinois. If you would like to take a look..

www.youtube.com...


Wow, that is an absolute awesome derecho

Wouldve been fantastic to experience that!

Thanks for posting that



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 11:10 AM
link   
post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.



new topics

top topics



 
1
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join